Archive for July, 2013|Monthly archive page

One Sunny Morning on I-287

Shortly before 8 a.m. today, I drove to White Plains from Tarrytown (entered I-87 from Broadway). Three exits into I-287, I was forced to reduce my 60 mph speed to 45 mph.

Morning traffic, I thought, par for the course. However if I was in a hurry or was on a commuter bus bound for White Plains Train Station, I’d be more than annoyed, especially since I had to fully brake many times due to congestion.

And I’d wonder if a logjam would greet me at the foot of Exit 5.

Now, I’m one motorist driving on a midsummer morning in clear weather, when the roads might be less crowded (people on vacation). Factor in rain, snow, sleet, fog — and other conditions that might necessitate reduced speeds — and the ride from Tarrytown would take longer.

This doesn’t take into account the time needed to travel via Route 119 to the County Center’s parking lot.

I suggest that the team proposing this option — whereby commuters bypass Tarrytown Train Station as part of a revamped plan — to the Mass Transit Task Force test-drive it (pardon the pun) and see for themselves.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Impact Pile Driving, Rockland Trestle Construction Begin

Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) begins impact pile driving whereby, for the next two to three months, 15 test piles will verify subsurface conditions in the river and pilings’ structural capacity.

Per the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the program is restricted to weekdays, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, from 12 noon to 7 p.m., and is not allowed at night or on Sundays.

Several months earlier, TZC installed perimeter real-time noise, vibration and air quality monitors near Rockland and Westchester counties’ shorelines as part of the project’s Environmental Performance Commitments (EPC).

Additionally, TZC will reconstruct a maintenance dock damaged during Hurricane Sandy, and continues building the Rockland bulkhead that will be part of the Thruway’s permanent dock, and will be the access point for the Rockland trestle.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Oyster Harvesting Program Underway

Friday was the fourth day of a weeklong process of moving 200,000 oysters out of the construction area, and relocating them in the Hudson River roughly three-quarters to one mile south, where they will thrive.

Courtesy of O’Rourke/New NY Bridge

Courtesy of O’Rourke/New NY Bridge

As with sturgeon monitoring and tagging, oyster harvesting is part of the state Department of Environmental Conservation Final Permit requirements, which contains $11.5 million for mitigation and restoration to protect the Hudson River and minimize the project’s environmental impacts.

About 13 acres of hard bottom/shell habitat will be relocated prior to August 1, when dredging begins for a three-month period.

Riverkeeper, Inc. and Scenic Hudson will also be involved with monitoring the construction as the project moves forward; check back for updates and additional information.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Sturgeon Monitors in Place for August 1 Dredging

We’re 10 days from the three-month restricted dredging period, with bubble curtains protecting endangered Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon. Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC placed acoustic receivers near the construction zone to locate these species, tagged by other researchers.

Data from the Sturgeon Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring Plan, developed by fisheries scientists to monitor the movement of sturgeon through the construction zone, will be sent to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

The chosen design requires less environmental impact regarding pile driving, dredging and threats to fish; the NYS DEC Final Permit, issued March 25, 2013, is posted at the New NY Bridge website.

Riverkeeper is asking anyone who sees a dead sturgeon to please report it per information posted on its website.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Chamfered (Angled) versus Squared

Daylight view courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Daylight view courtesy of the New NY Bridge

The Ides of March were busy for the newly-formed Visual Quality Panel, which announced it had developed options for the towers along the new bridge’s main span — and we would choose their look.

How the bridge would look with each option courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Our view with each option courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Option A, the original design described in Tappan Zee Constructor’s proposal, showed flat, rectangular, and squared towers 409 feet above the water; Option B, the recommended design, showed chamfered (angled) towers 419 feet above the water and provided a more slender appearance.

Night view courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Night view courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Less one week — and several hundred comments — later, the public chose, and the panel recommended, Option B. It will continue to seek community input, where applicable, as the project moves forward.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

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