Archive for August, 2013|Monthly archive page

Construction Suspended – Happy Labor Day Weekend

“Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) will not engage in any pre-construction activities that affect traffic through Monday, Sept. 2, in observance of Labor Day,” per an August 30 press release.

Courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Additionally, “no lane closures will be allowed until Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 10 a.m. in order to avoid impacts on motorists during the busy Labor Day holiday travel weekend. In addition, no impact pile driving is scheduled until Tuesday, Sept. 3.”

Scheduled closures for shoulder work on I-87/I-287 this week:

Tuesday, Sept. 3 — one northbound right-hand lane and shoulder near Exit 10, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Wednesday, Sept. 4 — the northbound right-hand and shoulder lane near Exit 10, from 10 a.m. to noon

Friday, Sept. 6 — one southbound right-hand lane and shoulder between the foot of the existing Tappan Zee Bridge and Exit 11, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Constant Presence in the Water

Tarrytown: partial view of bridge, river and familiar floating machinery/© J Rosman 2013

Tarrytown: partial view of bridge, river and familiar floating machinery/© J Rosman 2013

Walking to my car earlier this week, I stopped and turned to look at the bridge. My partial view included trees and several pieces of construction equipment, and I moved so that the trees blocked the machinery nearest to me.

Just because.

Although blocked from my vision, by my choice, for those few minutes, the apparatus is unmistakably present.

The U.S. Coast Guard’s Local Notice to Mariners — excerpted and in its entirety each week under Boater Safety Information on the New NY Bridge website — warned, “Numerous units of floating construction equipment will be operating in waterway north of the existing Tappan Zee Bridge.”

Activity in the river means BE EXTRA CAREFUL.

“Equipment will include crew boats, tugboats, barge mounted cranes and barges. Work to construct an access trestle and cofferdams north of the Tappan Zee Bridge extending 1,040 feet west from the Westchester shoreline will continue through November 2013,” the Notice said.

Dredging of access channels east and west of the main channel that began on August 1 will continue through October 2013, with floating equipment located east and west of the Main Navigation channel. Other ongoing work includes a pile load test program scheduled to continue through November 2013, and construction of a second trestle near the Rockland shoreline.

“Floating equipment necessary for portions of this phase (dredging and pile load test program) include barge mounted cranes, material barges, work boats, and tugboats that will occupy the channels, east and west and adjacent to the main navigation channel,” the Notice said, indicating the four equipment moorings near the Rockland shoreline.

The following was highlighted:

“When transiting the area mariners should stay clear of these locations by a minimum of 1000 feet. Mariners are advised to transit the main channel, reduce wake and use extreme caution while transiting the area in the vicinity of the Tappan Zee Bridge, paying particular attention to vessel movement and future notices.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Lane, Shoulder Closures as Rockland Trestle Work Begins

Today through Wednesday, work will begin on the second trestle, a 1,200-foot temporary work platform — one of two present during the five-year project — that will support a crane for construction of both the westernmost and easternmost parts of the new bridge.

Note: The photo above is not I-87/I-287 in Nyack, and is indicated for signage only.

Note: The photo above is not I-87/I-287 in Nyack, and is indicated for signage only.

Accordingly, one northbound (westbound) right lane and shoulder between the bridge and Exit 11 in Nyack will be closed from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. while concrete barriers are installed between traffic and the construction areas.

Daytime pile driving is restricted — per the Final Environmental Impact Statement — to weekdays, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, from 12 noon to 7 p.m., and is not permitted at night or on Sundays. Impact pile driving, part of the ongoing test pile program, continues through October at various locations, and during these same hours.

Does it sound too loud? Residents can check the perimeter real-time noise, vibration and air quality monitors near Rockland and Westchester counties’ shorelines, installed as part of the project’s Environmental Performance Commitments (EPC).

Activity in the river means BE EXTRA CAREFUL.  Per the U.S. Coast Guard’s Local Notice to Mariners, dated August 21:

“Numerous units of floating construction equipment will be operating in waterway north of the existing Tappan Zee Bridge,” the report — posted under Boater Safety Information on the New NY Bridge website — said.

The following was highlighted:

“When transiting the area mariners should stay clear of these locations by a minimum of 1000 feet. Mariners are advised to transit the main channel, reduce wake and use extreme caution while transiting the area in the vicinity of the Tappan Zee Bridge, paying particular attention to vessel movement and future notices.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

This Time Last Summer

Projected timeline for the bridge replacement project courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Projected timeline for the bridge replacement project courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Twelve short months earlier, three companies bidding to replace the aging Tappan Zee Bridge collectively responded to the state’s Request for Proposal with approximately 750,000 pages packed into about 70 boxes, and by a 4 p.m. deadline in late July.

Lots of numbers.

Days later, on August 1, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office released the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) detailing the minimum that must be done to mitigate environmental and other impacts of construction, project officials reiterated.

It’s what Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, Rockland County Executive Scott Vanderhoef and Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell needed to see before unanimously saying “yes” to the project, qualifying it for federal funding. They postponed a crucial New York Metropolitan Transportation Council (NYMTC) vote on July 10 before changing their minds at a special August 20 meeting.

There was talk of double-digit, tripled tolls; Cuomo called for a task force to find ways of saving costs. “For many Westchester and Rockland residents, the bridge is the only practical crossing for commuting, shopping and visiting family,” he said in a letter dated August 10 to Thruway Chairman Howard Milstein and Executive Director Thomas Madison Jr.

Milstein responded the same day that he, Madison, and Thruway employees share Cuomo’s goals to keep tolls “as affordable as possible to reduce the economic burden on local residents and all who use the bridge.”

“We’re going to work very hard over time to get the toll as low as possible,” Cuomo said during a September 19 conference about the bridge, citing that variables — total cost, amount of federal loan money, and financing options for the remainder — “are still on the table.”

More recently, with oyster harvesting completed, we’re nearly one-third through the dredging period, and other facets are in place (per above diagram). New York State anticipates news of a TIFIA (Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act) loan, as the Mass Transit Task Force and finance subcommittee were progressing toward their respective deadlines.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Safety Warnings Reiterated

Boater safety information from the New NY Bridge/Courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority

Boater safety information from the New NY Bridge/Courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority

An impromptu update about the bridge replacement project — it’s progressing, as residents can tell by the early morning and evening noise.

In addition to impact pile driving, part of the ongoing test pile program, “Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) will begin testing both static and lateral loads this week as part of its test pile program,” an August 16 press release said. This, to be sure the piles can sustain the design load of the new bridge; testing takes place during a 40-hour period.

Per the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the program is restricted to weekdays, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, from 12 noon to 7 p.m., and is not allowed at night or on Sundays; it continues through October at various locations for future pile foundations.

Residents can check the perimeter real-time noise, vibration and air quality monitors near Rockland and Westchester counties’ shorelines, installed as part of the project’s Environmental Performance Commitments (EPC).

Activity in the river means BE EXTRA CAREFUL.  Per the U.S. Coast Guard’s Local Notice to Mariners, dated August 14:

“Numerous units of floating construction equipment will be operating in waterway north of the existing Tappan Zee Bridge,” the report — posted under Boater Safety Information on the New NY Bridge website  — said.

“Equipment will include crew boats, tugboats, barge mounted cranes and barges. Work to construct an access trestle and cofferdams north of the Tappan Zee Bridge extending 1,040 feet west from the Westchester shoreline will continue through November 2013.”

Dredging of access channels east and west of the main channel will begin on August 1 and continue through October 2013. Floating equipment will be located east and west of the Main Navigation channel. Other ongoing work includes a pile load test program scheduled to continue through November 2013.

Citing the temporary fixed platforms, it warned, “Floating equipment necessary for portions of this phase (dredging and pile load test program) include barge mounted cranes, material barges, work boats, and tugboats that will occupy the channels, east and west and adjacent to the main navigation channel,” and noted the four equipment moorings near the Rockland shoreline.

The following was highlighted:

“When transiting the area mariners should stay clear of these locations by a minimum of 1000 feet. Mariners are advised to transit the main channel, reduce wake and use extreme caution while transiting the area in the vicinity of the Tappan Zee Bridge, paying particular attention to vessel movement and future notices.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

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