Archive for November, 2013|Monthly archive page

Resisting, Then Accepting, Change

One friend called my attention to a page dedicated to the current bridge, and I smiled. We all have stories about the bridge — I’m no exception — and yet, it’s human nature to resist change.

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

Two nights ago on Thanksgiving, I was in a local hospital waiting while my dad had a CAT scan; the technician who wheeled him from the ER to the X-ray room started a conversation with me.

I’m a reporter, I told him, and he wanted to know what kind of reporting, and what I liked about it, and what I was writing about at the moment. I love it, I told him, and have been doing it for more than 30 years (not counting high school and college), and that I report about many topics, including the bridge replacement project.

“People don’t like change, do they?” he asked. “At least, they don’t at first, and then, all of a sudden, they come around, and realize change is good.” He looked up at the TV on the wall, and then looked at me. I nodded.

Nearly everyone, including me, has stories to share about the bridge — when it was built, when it first opened, childhood trips, teenage years, watching the water, exploring the structure, years between then and now. During my journalism career I’ve written about different aspects — toll increases; movable barriers; accidents and escapades; and local first responders’ thoughts.

Change happens; it’s part of life. And in a few years, when the New NY Bridge is completed, people will look back and wonder how they drove on the old one, when the new one is so much cleaner-looking, safer, artistic and functional.

By the way, the bridge that some people (including me) are going to miss didn’t go over so well at first. Back then, many opposed the idea, according to a May 1, 1950, article in The New York Times. Sound familiar?

Change happens. Life happens. And right now, history is happening.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Construction Suspended Tomorrow

Double holiday — Thanksgiving and first day of the Jewish Festival of Lights (which begins tonight) — means no pile driving.

Two ducks swimming are oblivious to their river company in this recent image from an EarthCam® construction camera.

Two ducks swimming are oblivious to their river company in this recent image from an EarthCam® construction camera.

Work continues on the first of four new permanent noise barriers in Rockland County, and removal of sections of the existing noise wall along northbound I-87/I-287 in the area south of Exit 10.

A temporary noise barrier and noise monitors are near Exit 10, and additional temporary noise barriers, will be installed along a local access ramp and the New York State Thruway, after improvements are made to the ramp.

Permanent pile installation near the side channels under the existing bridge is from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays; occasionally, from 12 noon to 7 p.m. on Saturdays.

Recently-installed temporary navigational lights mark the 600 foot-wide main channel. The U.S. Coast Guard’s revised Local Notice to Mariners details the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) — 300 yards north and 200 yards south of the existing Tappan Zee Bridge — established in September. Both temporary and permanent piles are illuminated at night.

Activity in the river means BE EXTRA CAREFUL.

All boaters are required to use the main channel, reduce wake and use extreme caution while transiting the area. If necessary, the Coast Guard in the future may temporarily prohibit all vessel traffic in the RNA for safety purposes. The Coast Guard boating safety information — excerpted and in its entirety — is listed under Boater Safety Information on the New NY Bridge website.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

A Sailor Went to Sea Sea Sea

Had the most memorable summers at Robin Hill Day Camp in Yonkers; it later became a condo development (was near Fort Hill Road and Jackson Avenue).

I remember songs from camp shows, and wonder how Harriett (who directed us) managed to come up with new ideas each year. “The newspapers shout it, there’s no doubt about it, the facts are incontestable. Banners are flying, there is no denying, New York is a summer festival.”

Bet that was about the 1964-65 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows, Queens. Getting nostalgic. So back to the present.

♪ ♫ To see what he could see see see, And all that he could see see see, Was the bottom of the deep blue sea sea sea ♩ ♬

Maybe this includes the deep blue Hudson River as well — Thursday’s post of the EarthCam® construction camera views from Upper Grandview, and the marina in Tarrytown, got attention from the Commonwealth of Australia!

views Thursday

Blog stats to date: Seen by at least one person in each of 21 countries, including the USA, on five continents!

views by country

It was raining on and off by the time I got to the bridge on the way to a meeting in Rockland yesterday morning. Visibility wasn’t bad; the distraction was the construction machinery jutting up beyond the westbound lanes, like giant sea monsters. Not on the ride back on the bridge’s south side.

Today I went to the Palisades Center with mom and thought I wouldn’t notice them. I did and so did she. Maybe I won’t notice them next time.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Hot Off the Press!

Blue sky, blue river seen from the most recently-installed EarthCam® construction camera in Upper Grandview.

Blue sky, blue river seen from the most recently-installed EarthCam® construction camera in Upper Grandview.

Last night I was reviewing notes from a recent boater safety roundtable, and as I read, I heard the voices attached to the names. Another Local Notice to Mariners arrived in my email, and guess what? It may be the same information, the same charts and graphs, the same documentation and warnings — and it is ALL important. I wish everyone with a boat would read the LNM, posted under Boater Safety Information on the New NY Bridge website.

Another crisp day, seen from an EarthCam® construction camera at the marina in Tarrytown.

Another crisp day, seen from an EarthCam® construction camera at the marina in Tarrytown.

While it’s not possible to close off the river for five years — bedlam would ensue! — it is imperative that boaters be aware of what’s going on out there.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Lights, EarthCam®, and a Bit of Nostalgia

Here’s the view from Upper Grandview at 6 p.m., seen from the third EarthCam® construction camera that went live this afternoon:

TappanZeeBridge-NewYorkStateThroughway_view_from_Grandview

Nearly everyone, including me, has stories to share about the bridge — when it was built, when it first opened, childhood trips, teenage years, watching the water, exploring the structure, years between then and now. During my journalism career I’ve written about different aspects — toll increases; movable barriers; accidents and escapades; and local first responders’ thoughts.

Here’s the view from the marina in Tarrytown:

TappanZeeBridge-NewYorkStateThroughway_marina_Tarrytown_view

and a few minutes later from the bridge’s main span:

TappanZeeBridge-NewYorkStateThroughway_main_span_view

Returning from a trip upstate and, seeing the bridge, knowing we were home. The SUCO bus left Oneonta at 4 p.m., and arrived at the County Center at 8:30 p.m.; the Tappan Zee Bridge was in view by maybe 8:10 p.m. That was back in 1975-1976, and it was still very new. Did you remember when a horse-drawn train of covered wagons crossed it en route to Valley Forge, PA, for the bicentennial celebration?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

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