Archive for January, 2014|Monthly archive page

Super Bull Crane

Will Van Dorp, professor at Union County College in New Jersey, met the I Lift NY this very cold morning as it arrived from the West Coast at our very own Port Jersey Facility – The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey – escorted by tugboats Lauren Foss and Iver Foss. after docking at a private facility in Jersey City, it will stay put until it comes north to the Tappan Zee Bridge this spring.

tugster: a waterblog

It’s referred to now as Left Coast Lifter, I Lift NY, Ichabod Crane, and others.  But I call it arrived and on a glorious if frigid morning.

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Touchdown!!

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And Lauren Foss is the clear MVP.

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Bravo to all the crews and people behind the crews!

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More soon.

Here and here  she was at the southernmost arc of the voyage.

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Picture Perfect

Project officials tweeted January 24, “The river may be frozen, but fabrication of the steel piles continues in Pennsylvania pic.twitter.com/M6vFOHYdBQ.”

A new dusting of snow on the river, seen from an EarthCam® construction camera at the marina in Tarrytown this a.m.

A new dusting of snow on the river, seen from an EarthCam® construction camera at the marina in Tarrytown this a.m.

I love the views any time of day, more so at sunrise and sunset.

The contrast between nature's magnificence — this January 27 sunset, seen from the EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown — and activity in the river speaks for itself.

The contrast between nature’s magnificence — this January 27 sunset, seen from the EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown — and activity in the river speaks for itself.

Check for updates on the New NY Bridge website.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

Guest Blog: I Lift NY

Will Van Dorp, professor at Union County College in New Jersey, shares his observations about life on New York harbor via tugster: a waterblog on WordPress. Van Dorp, who is following the I Lift NY and its escorts, satisfies the curiosity surrounding the tugboats Lauren Foss and Iver Foss, which are due at that very harbor within two weeks.

Colossal new structures are arriving, and they will modify the riverscape between Nyack and Tarrytown for decades to come. One of these—the new Tappan Zee Bridge—will evolve, one huge piece at a time. The other—a crane integrated into a barge—will just float in. Soon. And it will erect the bridge, lifting sections weighing over a thousand tons.

The crane barge will arrive here after voyaging thousands of miles, with the Oakland bridge project as only its first. Because the crane barge has no propulsion power, it left Oakland, CA, on December 22, 2013, towed by tugboats Lauren Foss and Iver Foss. Both tugboats are operated by Foss Marine Holdings, a company that traces its history back to Tacoma, WA, in 1889, and a Norwegian immigrant named Thea Foss, said to be inspiration for “tugboat Annie.”

Tug boat Lauren Foss (extreme left) towing the crane on day one of its 6000-mile voyage (actually 5224 nautical miles = 6011 statute miles)/Courtesy of Capt. Terry O’Neil

Tug boat Lauren Foss (extreme left) towing the crane on day one of its 6000-mile voyage (actually 5224 nautical miles = 6011 statute miles)/Courtesy of Capt. Terry O’Neil

Lauren Foss is 141’ long and rated at 7200 horsepower, making it among the most powerful tugboats to operate on the Hudson. Iver Foss is 91’ long with 2400 horsepower, and is tethered to the stern of the crane barge to serve as a rudder to the barge.

After delivering the crane, Lauren will not remain here. Likely it will steam to Philadelphia to tow the mothballed aircraft carrier USS Forrestal to Texas to be scrapped.

The crane arrived in Oakland in 2009 from Shanghai, China. For the 6200-mile Pacific crossing, the crane traveled on the deck of a heavy-lift ship called Zhenhua 22. Heavy-lift ships like Zhenhua 22 are partially sunk for loading and offloading so that cargo can be floated off or on.

Heavy-lift ship Zhenhua 18 delivered these port cranes from ZPMC Shanghai to Port Elizabeth, NJ, near the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, in March 2007/Courtesy of Will Van Dorp

Heavy-lift ship Zhenhua 18 delivered these port cranes from ZPMC Shanghai to Port Elizabeth, NJ, near the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, in March 2007/Courtesy of Will Van Dorp

A Shanghai company called ZPMC collaborated with several US companies to build this crane for a cost of approximately $50 million. Noteworthy is the fact that the barge that supports the crane was built in Portland, OR, on the Columbia River and transported to China for the crane to be mounted.

Although the I Lift NY has tremendous lifting capacity, it is by no means the largest floating crane in the world. Currently that title goes to cranes like Thialf and Saipem 7000, which can lift 14,000 tons or more.

All that being said, the crane that will enter the Hudson River within a week is arguably the largest and most powerful crane ever seen in these waters. Watch this space for more information on its arrival.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

Train to Nowhere for Transit Woes?

Formed in December 2012, the Mass Transit Task Force — co-chaired by Thruway Authority Executive Director Thomas J. Madison and DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald — has been brainstorming county-specific and regional solutions.

What will be the final transit recommendations?/Courtesy of LEGO® City Public Transport

What will be the final transit recommendations?/Courtesy of LEGO® City Public Transport

In February (its third, and first open, meeting), members agreed that peak and rush hour travel times are gone; commuters ride the rails — and reverse commute — days, nights, and weekends, partly because of expanding health care, education and technology.

Several holidays after its November (and most recent) meeting, the group is ready to roll up its sleeves once again.

Since last year, I’ve been writing that the transit task force is getting closer to solutions — and it is, via a process. It was on a roll in early 2013, and had potential answers, followed by changed minds, dissatisfaction, revival of the ramp idea, and realizations.

We’ve been told, “The New NY Bridge will reduce congestion, increase driver safety, and create a new foundation for mass transit in the region.”

Courtesy of the New NY Bridge

Courtesy of the New NY Bridge

We can attest to traffic jams that stretch across I-287 as far back as Exit 8 in White Plains, and beyond. And we know the current bridge has no mass transit capability.

When his suggestions were met with surprise, curiosity and some concern during the June meeting, Trent Lethco, AICP, principal at ARUP engineering, told the group, “Where it (mass transit) connects is less important than how it connects.”

I have an idea.

Put the bus transfer station idea back on the table, and include a train (shuttle) across the bridge. Future rail service is integrated into the new bridge’s design; why does it have to extend beyond the bridge? It would take people from landing to landing, where they’d meet their respective buses.

Is it feasible? There would be need for a small station on the Rockland side, too; however I bet these will cost a fraction of a regional rail system, and allow greater bus service flexibility within each county. Which authority would oversee the rail service? That’s another consideration.

How close is the group to finding transit options for two counties, the region — including local airports, and Amtrak — for 2018, when the new bridge opens, and beyond? Maybe it can start with a train to nowhere.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

Remember Summer?

July is a four-letter word.

Six months ago today was day four of the weeklong process of moving 200,000 oysters out of the construction area, and relocating them in the Hudson River roughly three-quarters to one mile south, where they would thrive. August 1 opened the three-month (to November 1) window for dredging in the Hudson River round-the-clock.

Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) placed acoustic receivers near the construction zone in June to locate endangered Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon that were tagged by other researchers.

Storms that pummeled our area forced TZC to cease marine operations for safety purposes for several days.

Storms that pummeled our area forced TZC to cease marine operations for safety purposes for several days.

July began impact pile driving — for the next two to three months, 15 test piles verified subsurface conditions in the river and pilings’ structural capacity.

Colorful morning on the river, seen at 6:45 a.m. from the EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown.

Colorful morning on the river, seen at 6:45 a.m. from the EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown.

Additionally, TZC would rebuild a maintenance dock damaged during Hurricane Sandy, and continued building the Rockland bulkhead that would be part of the Thruway’s permanent dock, the access point for the Rockland trestle.

The heat wasn’t so bad, was it? I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

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