New NY Bridge Video: Right Before Your Eyes

Do you check the EarthCam® construction cameras to see what’s doing on the river? Or to see the sunrise or sunset? If you thought the video “A New Bridge Rising” was cool, you’ll really like “Project Year 2014 in Two Minutes.”

One of more than 30 barge-mounted cranes/New NY Bridge

One of more than 30 barge-mounted cranes/New NY Bridge

Hot off the presses, er, video screen is the fascinating time-lapsed video shown during educational outreach presentations.

The video shows TZC’s armada of floating cranes and hundreds of workers installing nearly two-thirds of the new bridge’s foundation piles during the first 12 months of construction.

It starts with fall 2013, when the U.S. Coast Guard established the first Regulated Navigation Area (RNA). You recall nearly one year later, it set stricter guidelines, and that’s because, well, you’ll see in the video.

Reason for U.S. Coast Guard’s strict RNA/New NY Bridge

Reason for U.S. Coast Guard’s strict RNA/New NY Bridge

This is a very cool compilation of construction camera views and processes from different angles, including pile cleansing, pile cap submersion — which I heard described and had never seen — and a lots of other neat activity.

It also portrays the construction of large, flat concrete structures called pile caps that are lowered onto the piles to unify their strength. Inside the pile caps, workers install cages of reinforcing steel that are encased in concrete to provide the strength necessary to support the new bridge.

I’ve been on numerous media tours during the past year and have tried to picture what was being described.

Working on one of the massive pile caps/New NY Bridge

Working on one of the massive pile caps/New NY Bridge

The 60-foot wide pile cap is 360-plus feet long (with) a concrete precast bottom in it that sits over the piles. Once it’s submerged eight feet into the Hudson River and pumped free of water, the piles are sealed, rebar is added, and the cap is filled with 11,000 cubic yards of concrete.

That’s 3.6 percent of the approximately 300,000 cubic yards of concrete to be placed. Four months ago, Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) President Darrell Waters said crews will “hopefully erect our first piece of steel by the end of this year. We feel pretty good about where we are, still an aggressive schedule.”

Pier skeleton: galvanized steel bar cages/New NY Bridge

Pier skeleton: galvanized steel bar cages/New NY Bridge

And this brings us to what’s happened recently: formwork around the first two pier towers being removed.

I enjoyed watching this video, especially after hearing the processes described. Did you see it?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

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