Students share about Engineering Awareness Day

College students were tour guides for the scouts/NNYB

College students were tour guides for the scouts/NNYB

While Crestwood/Yonkers Cub Scout Pack 6  had a blast at the recent Engineering Awareness Day planned especially for them, the Manhattan College students who arranged and staffed the two-day program were also excited at the scouts’ enthusiasm.

Chi Epsilon Engineering Honor Society officers who participated share their thoughts about it and about their interests in engineering.

“The Boy Scouts event was a complete success. Early on it was evident how full of life and open-minded these young boys were. I would have given anything to have had such events when I was their age.” — Treasurer Stephanie Castro

Applying learned knowledge = comprehension/Photo: Dr. Dre

Applying learned knowledge = comprehension/Photo: Dr. Dre

Although her initial career choice was forensic science, Castro followed her high school physic teacher’s recommendation and changed to a STEM field.  “Engineering incorporates my passion for both math and science,” she said.

Editor Stephanie Costello felt the program engaged the scouts in a way they could understand. “I enjoy problem solving and the idea that the structures I design will be my own legacy.”

“Engineering is such a great field to be involved in as there is so much opportunity to really make a difference in the world.” — Vice President Samantha Corrado

STEM fields provide untold possibilities/Photo: Dr. Dre

STEM fields provide untold possibilities/Photo: Dr. Dre

An Eagle Scout and a student leader in the college’s Civil Engineering Department, Chi Epsilon President T.J. Bolen said he loved math and science class when he was younger and wanted to become a rocket scientist.

“Since then I had learned about the different aspects of engineering through various means and decided that I want to do Environmental Engineering,” Bolen said, crediting his activities with the Boy Scouts for its role in his decisions as most of his Scout Masters were engineers or scientists.

“I think it’s important to introduce the idea that careers in the science and engineering fields are fun rather than give a stigma that they are too difficult to attain.” — Stephanie Costello

Testing structures for strength, movement/Photo: Dr. Dre

Testing structures for strength, movement/Photo: Dr. Dre

Secretary Jonathan Caciola also loved solving problems. “I developed strong skills in math and science and realized (it) would allow me to apply those skills to solve some of the most important problems our society needed answered,” he said.

“Seeing young kids excited about engineering is always a great thing to see and being able to promote civil engineering was truly a pleasure.” — Jonathan Caciola

He was impressed with the way scouts researched different designs “and chose one that spoke to them,” their enthusiasm on the tour and their eagerness to ask questions. “”I hope that after graduation I can use what I have learned to make a difference and come up with solutions that will impact people’s lives.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2015

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