Archive for January, 2019|Monthly archive page

Five Years Ago Today: the Super Crane Arrived

Courtesy of Phil Little

Courtesy of Phil Little

Will Van Dorp, professor at Union County College in New Jersey, met the I Lift NY this very cold morning as it arrived from the West Coast at our very own Port Jersey Facility – The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey – escorted by tug boats Lauren Foss and Iver Foss. after docking at a private facility in Jersey City, it will stay put until it comes north to the Tappan Zee Bridge this spring.

Excitement, cameras, and (perhaps) a sigh of relief — it’s finally here — greeted the I Lift NY‘s arrival two days ago. I’m guessing the relief part.

Nowhere among the day’s pictures did I see any like the first three snapped by waterblogger Will Van Dorp; he captured I Lift NY‘s approach on the aquatic horizon, led by tugboat Lauren Foss, adding drama to suspense. Tugboat Iver Foss followed.

A New York state of mind is also apparent in these pictures taken by photographer Phil Little with the Freedom Tower and Statue of Liberty background.

Sunlight bathed the Tappan Zee bridge shortly before the I Lift NY's arrival at The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey./EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown

Sunlight bathed the Tappan Zee bridge shortly before the I Lift NY’s arrival at The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey./EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown

Correction: Two weeks ago prior to the original post I said the crane, owned by Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) was renamed. It wasn’t. It was dubbed, nicknamed. Long ago and far away, it was christened the “Left Coast Lifter” for its work on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge construction project. That was then, this is now.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

After a Carwash-like Rainstorm, Beauty Appears

And after it rains there’s a rainbow is a line from Simon & Garfunkel’s song “My Little Town.” A gorgeous rainbow captured by the EarthCam® construction camera this afternoon brought those lyrics to mind.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Winter Storm Coming & about Driving in One

Trucking through a snowstorm on the Tappan Zee Bridge (not the same day) /© Wn.com

Trucking through a snowstorm on the Tappan Zee Bridge (not the same day) /© Wn.com

As of 3 p.m.today, tractor trailers and buses are banned from the 570-mile Thruway system and most interstate highways. Exceptions are I-95 in Westchester and Bronx counties. This means its 809 bridges, 118 interchanges, 11 toll barriers, and 27 service areas.

I’ve not driven on the new bridge during a snowstorm yet and don’t plan to yet.

About five winters ago I covered school board meetings in one of the Rivertowns. I usually took local roads west to Route 9 (Broadway), made a right turn and drove north to the school. One night after a meeting we walked back to find our cars covered in snow falling faster than I could count snowflakes. I was scared.

The car I’ve been driving for more than 20 years has seen me safely through both snowstorms and rainstorms (the kind where you put the windshield wipers on the fastest speed because the rain is coming down so fast that the regular speed isn’t fast enough).

Dad told me never to start the car and then get out to clean the windows because gosh forbid it shifts into gear. So after I cleared the windows, and did them again because it was snowing so hard, I started the car and turned on the wipers and the defroster.

As the car was warming up I was figuring out the safest way to drive home. And that very night I hoped there were lots of trucks on the highway.

If you know where Irvington is, then you know it’s nowhere near the interstate. Driving home on the same local road with its hills, hidden turns and sporadic lighting, although most direct, would be asking for trouble in that treacherous weather.

Instead, I headed north on Route 9 (Broadway) to Tarrytown and turned onto the Thruway, which fed into I-287. And I wasn’t disappointed! Plenty of trucks on the road that night to make tire indentations in the snow for drivers like me who had no business driving that night. Except for that school board meeting.

Got home safely. Forget that I was gripping the wheel and praying.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

TZB Demolition in Real Time & in Slow Motion

In case you missed the event yesterday as I did, here it is again in real time and in slow motion courtesy of Kevin P. Coughlin/State of New York. The section looks like it’s floating on the water; however, the perfect fall caused its columns to drop to the river bottom.

Demolition experts will place charges on vertical support structures along the span of the bridge. The charges are timed to detonate in a way that will safely lower the remaining structure eastward, away from the Hudson River’s main navigation channel, according to a fact sheet released by the construction project.

Fitting it happened this month: January 2013 was when the Thruway Authority issued Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) Notice To Proceed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

TZB Anchor Span falls via Controlled Demolition

Crowds had gathered since early this morning to watch the controlled demolition of the ironic Tappan Zee Bridge. The temperate was below freezing; still, this was not to be missed despite its occurrence on a weekday morning. I’m sure motorists were annoyed that the estimated 10 a.m. explosion occurred nearly one hour later and can only imagine waiting on clogged westbound 287 in Westchester and the equally clogged eastbound Thruway in Rockland.

The above photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority shows the anchor span minutes after it fell into the Hudson River.

Demolition and salvage experts hired by Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) were in charge of the procedure. Vertical members of the span fell so the team could safely lower the span away from the main channel using specialty marine salvage equipment, per a fact sheet. Material will be removed from the river during the following weeks by mMarine salvage experts; chains on the riverbed will remove the steel and support the salvaged structure, which TZC will place on barges and remove from the site.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

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