Archive for February, 2020|Monthly archive page

Accessing New Path from the Rockland Landing

THE FLUX OF BEING (Chris Soria, Nyack) Mural

The new path will have colorful murals under the South Broadway underpass. For someone like my mom, who is in a wheelchair, how to see the art? It looks like a precarious route from the South Nyack landing’s parking lot.

The spur path behind the Village Hall this be an alternative way for her, and others who are wheelchair-bound, to access and view this mural. The only rendering that shows someone in a wheelchair is close to the Tarrytown landing at street level.

Ramp behind South Nyack Village hall leads to path, trail/courtesy of @BikeTarrytown

Path accessibility from the Rockland landing may be challenging for people who are in wheelchairs like my mom; an entrance closer to river level would have been more convenient. It looks like a big push to the spur path and a steep decline for a wheelchair.

Residents’ resistance resulted in the state moving the terminus to its land at Exit 10, and the village determined to prevent outsiders from parking on its streets to access the spur path.

We’ll see what happens when it opens.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Greenburgh Town Supervisor says a Bike Path is needed on Route 119 for Safety Reasons

Socks, sneakers and wheels indicate a sign of the path to come/NYS Thruway Authority

“We need to encourage the members of the NYS Legislature to fund a bike path on Route 119 (a NYS road) so cyclists will be able to safely get to the Mario Cuomo Bridge bike path when it opens soon. Route 119 is very busy and dangerous for cyclists,” Greenburgh Town Supervisor Paul Feiner wrote in a post on the village’s website here.

“In less than two months the NYS Legislature will approve the budget. It’s my hope that funding will be included for a bike path on Route 119 from the North and South County trails to the Mario Cuomo Bridge.

A bicycle lane will be opening on the new bridge within months. Unfortunately, it’s not very safe for cyclists to use unless they are experienced riders. Route 119 is a very busy road (with) lots of traffic. We’ve had bicycle accidents on Route 119 in the past, including a fatal accident closer to the County Center (there is a ghost bicycle at the scene of the accident to remind cyclists and motorists of the dangers).

Bicycle enthusiasts are very excited about the new bike path on the bridge. We would be more excited if there would be a safe way to get to and from the bridge. A bike path on Route 119 from the South and North County trails would enable cyclists to bike from the Bronx and Putnam County lines (South and North County trails) to Rockland safely.

This proposed bike lane is located in Greenburgh. However, it will be used by tourists and cyclists from all over the world since the bike path is expected to become a destination location, which is another reason why this bike path is so needed.”

Reposted from the Town of Greenburgh’s website.

Follow up to Last Week’s NYSTA FOIL Adventure

Look up at the sky, and what do you see? Endless space.

Something else that’s endless: the rabbit hole one falls into when making a FOIL request of the New York State Thruway Authority. Turns out I’m not alone.

CBS6 newscaster and reporter Greg Floyd described his nearly year-long attempt to get financial information about the new Capital Region Welcome Center.

And although some of the information I asked for was revealed in a press release last Friday, Records Access Officer Jill B. Warner told me:

“We are performing a diligent search for records responsive to your request. We will notify you of our progress by March 3, 2020. Copies of responsive documents are available pursuant to the Freedom of Information Law Section 87(1)(b) & (c).”

Now it’s moot; however, no one is alone for long in the NYSTA FOIL rabbit hole. My journey began with floating concrete batch plants . . .

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Making a Neighborhood Trail into a Tourist Site

During Friday’s conversation the project official said the art will be a destination for people who visit from the city or other parts of the county. Perhaps.

When I noted one artist from Rockland was chosen, and none is from Westchester, he said there was a lengthy selection process, and wouldn’t I agree that the best artists live in or near the city?

No, I told him. I disagree.

TAPPAN ZEE (Ilan Averbuch, Long Island City) Sculpture

The above sculpture “pays homage to the Native American Lenape and their history along the Hudson River, while also symbolizing the value of collaboration in crossing rivers, building communities, and reaching new horizons,” the press release said.

I hope New York State’s next governor will consider paying homage to their history along the Hudson River by restoring the name Tappan Zee to the new bridge.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Secret’s Out yet Some knew Ahead of Others

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The long-awaited announcement about artists whose works will be placed where on the westbound span’s side path was revealed publicly Friday (January 31) at 11 a.m.

However, it was revealed privately the day (or hours) before, evidenced by a news story published at 7:27 a.m. that day.

Timing of the nicely-explained story featuring the art in a slideshow is another example of how the state plays favorites with media. I’ve experienced it several times during the past nearly eight years I’ve written about this project.

The project’s director of communications called me Thursday night and said lots of information would be coming the next day even though word was already out. It’s not the first time a project spokesperson lied to me and either covered his tracks or denied it.

Some media are more important than others, it seems.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

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