Archive for the ‘New NY Bridge’ Category

TBT: Going Vertical with Concrete Batch Plants

Today is six months since President Barack Obama was in town with Governor Cuomo, who visited Piermont last month. The Crane! The Crane! If you watched “Fantasy Island” years ago, then you’ll remember the opening scenes.

Tappan Zee Bridge in the background/© Janie Rosman 2014

Tappan Zee Bridge in the background/© Janie Rosman 2014

This machine is serious business. It’s being readied for what comes next: lifting pile and girder deck segments . . . and then dismantling the current bridge.

Realizing it’s not possible to see either the staging area or activity from the road, Team Outreach posted these photos and descriptions on the New NY Bridge Twitter page:

Floating concrete batch plants: three hoppers w/ gravel, sand, cement/NNYB Outreach

Floating concrete batch plants: three hoppers w/ gravel, sand, cement/NNYB Outreach

Pop quiz: If one plant can cast about 125 cubic yards of concrete per hour, how long will it take both plants together to make approximately 300,000 cubic yards of concrete for the new bridge?

Top and inside of one pier cap, installed with rebar, nr the Rockland side/NNYB Outreach

Top and inside of one pier cap, installed with rebar, nr the Rockland side/NNYB Outreach

When TZC president Darrell Waters told reporters the project was “going vertical,” this is what he meant.

Two of the new bridge’s 86 vertical steel towers nr the Westchester side/Outreach

Today’s sunny and clear weather is perfect for checking out the viewing area at RiverWalk Park.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

Lane and Exit Closures per work on TZB Landings

This photo of Tappan Zee Bridge structural steel being removed with the bridge and river as backdrops is courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

You can see crews removing parts of the Westchester landing as you drive across from Rockland. The super crane will help with the removal starting in November.

What you can’t see is the Rockland landing; however, River Road in South Nyack is closed while crews work on the Rockland landings; click here for detour route, ramp and lane closures from Exit 11 southbound to Exit 10 through next Friday.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Artistic Installations gather at Scarecrow Invasion

As I drove past this friendly group yesterday, I heard the introduction to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” in my head. What a fantabulous line dance team it would be!

This lovely lady greeted me as she hung from one of the trees, floating gracefully in the breeze. And it was breezy! Kinda neat that the wind added to the atmosphere around 3:30 p.m. yesterday at Lyndhurst’s Scarecrow Invasion.

Met a powerful-looking figure who’s really very tame and friendly. A sign on one of his legs says high voltage and for authorized personnel only. The visible sign reminds all to drive slowly on the grounds and when driving past road work.

From its perch, this bird was deep in thought as it watched visitors walking by.

So much to see at this annual creative culmination of time, care and imagination.

Despite a danger warning, the friendly worker above didn’t object when your intrepid reporter posed for a photo next to him. Scarecrow Invasion is open at night starting October 19 through 31. Maybe some figures or their parts light up in the dark? Will be cool to see at night. Boo!

NOTE: If you visit the property after dusk to see the outdoor exhibit, then you will be directed to park on a flat level a good hike from the main drive.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

A Look Back at Turn-of-the-Century Bridge Plans

Originally scheduled for print publication, this story was cut due to lack of space. Photos from when the Tappan Zee Bridge was built are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Forty-one months ago and with the recently-closed Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge as his backdrop, President Barack Obama spoke about his transportation bill, announcing a new infrastructure plan that included fast-tracking the bridge replacement project.

“At times you can see the river through the cracks of the pavement,” Obama had commented about it. “Now, I’m not an engineer, but I figure that’s not good.

* * * * *

The idea to build a bridge across one of the widest points in the Hudson River began as early as 1905 with a bridge (railroad) Piermont to Hastings. Calls continued for the next 20 or so years.

Craig Long, historian for Rockland County, the villages of Montebello and Suffern and the Town of Ramapo, recalled Pearl River resident and state assemblyman Fred Horn — nicknamed “Father of the Bridge” — proposed a bill in 1930 for a bridge from Piermont to Hastings with Hook Mountain and Rockland Lake as other locations.

During the next two years, Horn proposed that idea and a bridge/tunnel from Snedens Landing to Dobb’s Ferry; however, the site was within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s 25-mile jurisdiction. Those ideas failed as did Horn when he ran for re-election.

Long said via email that in 1935, the Rockland Causeway-Tunnel Authority was created with a drive to bridge the Hudson from Nyack to Tarrytown. “As studies begin, no determination is made as to whether Upper Nyack, Nyack, or South Nyack will be the bridge’s terminus. In August of that year, it is central Nyack; by October it is South Nyack, Voorhis Point.”

The following March (1936) Grand View was chosen as a potential landing site; by August the War Department approved it and Tarrytown on the Westchester side. While Hook Mountain again a choice the northern location didn’t sit well with Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader, who gained support for nixing the idea, or with residents.

“This is the beauty spot of the Hudson Valley, which should not be destroyed by a bridge,” Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader protested. New York State governor Thomas E. Dewey, and local legislators, received hundreds of telegrams and letters protesting the proposed 3.25-mile crossing, according to an editorial in The New York Times said.

South Nyack’s business district and Tarrytown riverfront estates were sacrificed and paved the way for this Hudson Valley crossing more than 60 years ago that lasted beyond its time. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute alumnus Emil H. Pager of Madigan-Hyland designed the $81 million Bridge for a 50-year service life that resulted in a utilitarian appearance, RPI Professor Michael Symons noted.

Foundation piers and steel false work were constructed near Haverstraw at Grassy Point. Rive water was dammed off to lower its level, and when the piers were completed, the dams were broken to release the water. Those newly-constructed sections were then towed downriver to the project site.

Ten days before Christmas 1955, the new bridge opened to traffic, connecting I-87 northbound from New York City to Albany, and later connecting to I-287 (Cross Westchester Expressway). Legislation signed by Governor W. Averell Harriman on February 28, 1956, officially named it the Tappan Zee Bridge to honor the Tappan Indians of the Lenape tribe and Zee for “sea” in Dutch.

Twelve-year-old Paul Anderson surprised everyone at the ribbon-cutting ceremony — including Nyack resident and actress Helen Hayes MacArthur, Thruway Authority Chairman Bertram D. Tallamy, and other dignitaries — by walking across the bridge, earning him a ride in the governor’s black Cadillac.

In 1994, the structure was rededicated and renamed when Governor Malcolm Wilson’s name was added on the 20th anniversary of his leaving the governor’s office.

A 27-mile stretch of Thruway from Suffern to Yonkers opened only 18 months after the first cars drove on the thruway upstate. Not what you’d expect four days after opening was a major traffic accident when four cars traveling from Rockland to Westchester at dusk bumped into each other.

The bridge was eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (under Criteria A and C in Appendix D – Preliminary Section 106 and 4(f) Analysis for Tappan Zee Bridge). The purportedly-100-year-old wood barge and its coal cargo submerged below – reminiscent of the river’s role in industry and commerce, and in the construction zone – was also recommended for the same prestigious award.

Coincidentally, March 1952 marked the start of construction, and 60 years later (March 2012) came a Request for Proposal (RFP) for its replacement — the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge — whose westbound span recently opened. As eastbound traffic was moved to that span ahead of schedule, crews are dismantling the TZB’s landings so the new bridge’s eastbound span can be completed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

TZB’s Final Curtain Call & a New Eastbound Ride

A mysterious driver was the last car across the 3.1-mile span last night honking what sounded like an ooga horn. Photos courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

My last ride across the Tappan Zee Bridge was about 70 minutes earlier. As with the westbound trip, I had to drive it one last time. OK, I drove westbound twice. Just because.

My friend, photographer and writer Frank LoBuono, drove eastbound on the new span earlier today and shared his descriptive observations and thoughts.  You can ride along with him and cross the river vicariously here.

Were you on the Tappan Zee last night near the time of its final curtain call?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

 

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