Archive for the ‘Rockland County’ Category

TBT: Early 1950s South Nyack prior to the TZB

Photo of the South Nyack train station, the Blue Flame, Eddie Nolan’s Restaurant Bar, and Gus Gaetjen’s Garage prior to being razed.

Demolition for the Tappan Zee Bridge and the New York State Thruway’s Exit 10 carried on in front of them February 1, 1954, less than two years before the bridge opened.

Photo of this former village landmark was taken in 1953; the station, located on Cornelison Avenue, was photographed in 1951.

Progress has again changed the village: there’s a new traffic pattern at Exit 10, and the greenery and solace found within the Esposito Trail to be replaced by a side path alongside the cinder trail.

Images are courtesy of the Nyack Library, New York Heritage Digital Collections, https://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/nyacklib/id/359/rec/3

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2015

Low Turnout at Toll Advisory Panel Meetings

Thinking I’d be unable to drive due to the ace bandage on my right wrist and hand I emailed my comments to the Toll Advisory Panel instead of going to the meeting in Tarrytown last night.

The hand surgery didn’t happen by quirk and by fate so I spent the past week meeting staff and getting to know residents at the nursing home where mom is temporarily staying. Things worked out well in that respect.

Surgery was rescheduled. About the toll meetings . . .

Why did the panel hear comments only one night in each county? Why wasn’t there a public comment period open for one month or three months or six months? It’s mid-July and sweltering outside; that plus a horrific rainstorm may have contributed to the low turnout last night and (although it didn’t rain as heavily) tonight.

Less than 100 people addressed the panel; how many others submitted written comments? Will those comments be made public? The governor’s task force and his comments nearly five years ago never came to fruition; let’s see what happens next.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Advisory Panel to hear Residents’ Input and Suggestions for Toll Relief on New Bridge

A new, four-person panel will take the first step toward toll relief solutions for Westchester and Rockland residents who cross the new Cuomo Bridge via two public sessions next week from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, will be at the Westchester Marriott, 670 White Plains Road, Tarrytown, and Thursday, July 18, will be at The Time Nyack Hotel, 400 High Ave.

Listening without responding to each person, who has two minutes to speak, will be Robert Megna – Co-Chair, Joan McDonald, Heather Briccetti and Mario Cilento. Those who want to speak must sign up for a two-minute chance to address the panel, which will only listen and will not take questions.

The public can also submit comments to TollAdvisoryPanel@thruway.ny.gov.

Let’s hope the group of four does more than the mass transit task force, which said we need bus rapid transit and left it to others to implement the decision.

“Who will take the initiative to make sure the recommendations will move forward?” State Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (88th District) asked at the final transit meeting in February 2014. Then-state DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald replied, “Our charge was to make recommendations. It’s up to the governor and the Thruway Authority to see what are the next steps.”

Tolls on the Cuomo Bridge are $5 through the end of December 2020.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Throwback Thursday: Deck Panel Installation

This time last year:

Crews continue to set precast concrete deck panels atop the steel girders, install rebar, pour concrete and ready the driving surface of the eastbound span. This is what the westbound span looked like before its final driving surface was applied. Deck panels were interlocked via their hairpin reinforcing steel bars; the spaces between them were closed with reinforcing concrete.

They’re doing other work, too, including removing sections of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Their order is the section south of the center, a cantilever truss weighing 4,560 tons; strand jacks will then help lower the main span section closest to Westchester, an anchor span weighing 5,350 tons, onto barges. Then comes the section south of the center, followed by the section closest to Rockland.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Five Years Ago Today: Transit Recommendations

The jughandle turn to Route 119 is further north/Courtesy of Ian C. Ligget

Early speculation that bus rapid transit would start day one the new bridge opened in 2018 was correct, per the Final Transit Recommendations released after the final committee meeting last month in Tarrytown.

Possibly bus stops in Rockland County include: Chestnut Street Suffern, Campbell Avenue/Herrion Road Suffern, Rt. 306 Monsey, Spring Valley Transit Center, Nanuet Park & Ride, The Shops at Nanuet®, Palisades Center, Lot J, Macy’s, Nyack Hospital, Main Street, Nyack and Interchange 10 on the Thruway in South Nyack.

“It is important to note that many other transit options were considered by the (31-member) MTTF, including commuter and light rail options,” per a disclaimer. Ideas for the short-term (now through 2018), mid-term (15 years after the bridge is built), and long-term (2033 and beyond) now face land use and financial challenges.

One money source is the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) Discretionary Grant program, through which $600 million was recently made available.

While the new system changes transportation options within and between Westchester and Rockland, based on studies indicating increased commuting within counties than to New York City, “Local jurisdictions will have to be consulted about whether priority transit can be done,” ARUP engineer Trent Lethco, AICP said.

If the free WiFi, better seats and covered station stops don’t attract riders, maybe the unified fare system, or priority transit will: BRT is a guaranteed 25 percent faster on local roads, 20 percent so on I-287.

Money and time savers were music to South Nyack resident Annie Hekker Weiss, who spends two hours daily in transit to work. “That’s four extra hours every day to pay a babysitter for commuting time. Thank you for helping to figure this out for us.”

“South Nyack has been recommended for a $250,000 grant through the NNYB Community Benefit Program to study Interchange 10 and potential development opportunities surrounding it,” the summary said. Ramp metering and signal upgrades are proposed for Route 59, and a future study will decide if a new Thruway exit, Interchange 14X near Airmont/Viola/Monsey, can relieve traffic on that route.

And while the new bridge’s $300 million worth of structural strength can support future rail, there’s no place to build it — now. One short-term improvement calls for an I-287 corridor study to reserve (search for) space in case new facilities are desired. “Today there is insufficient room to allow for the introduction of new measures to improve transit or transportation performance,” the summary said.

Seven proposed routes (three between the counties, three within Westchester, and one connecting Westchester to the Bronx) will connect with transit hubs, including the Palisades Center, downtown Nyack, the Shops at Nanuet, downtown Suffern, and Westchester County Airport.

Earlier-omitted travel routes were needs were added back — Suffern-to-Yonkers via a transfer at Spring Valley, Port Chester-to-Suffern trips via a Valhalla transfer — as was Tarrytown Mayor Drew Fixell’s suggestion to revisit the Tarrytown-to-White Plains segment of I-287 see what improvements can be made.

White Plains will get a new transit hub, thanks to White Plains Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC)’s $1 million study grant. Also in mid-term plans are Exit 11 reconstruction, West-of-Hudson rail improvements, and a new in-line BRT at the Palisades Center. East-west trains, and passenger service on the West Shore line, are planned for the long-term; the groups suggested talks with NYSDOT, MTA, and New Jersey Transit.

The invisible elephant appeared when Westchester League of Conservation Voters Board Member John Nonna commented, “The level of where you set the toll will determine the level of mass transit that will be considered.”

“Who will take the initiative to make sure the recommendations will move forward?” State Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (88th District) asked. State DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald replied, “Our charge was to make recommendations. It’s up to the governor and the Thruway Authority to see what are the next steps.”

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times March 4, 2014.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

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