Archive for the ‘shared use path’ Category

Another gantry added to the Westbound Span

hidden-tunnel

Took a blog hiatus and am back! Here’s where I temporarily disappeared.

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Last week crews installed the second of eight overhead gantries on the Rockland side of the westbound span.  Ten gantries will be installed on the eastbound span, 18 in all.

Meantime, here are sights from en route to the edge of the westbound span.

sup-abutment

We passed the shared use path abutment on the Westchester landing . . .

expansion-joint

. . . and workers installing an expansion joint connecting road deck panels.

location-marking

This is a location marker for guess which belvedere of the shared use path?

sup-wall-structure

Terrific view of the Rockland shoreline backdrops steel rebar structure for beginnings of what will be a concrete retaining wall for the shared use path.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Renderings for Walking/Bicycle Path Terminus

rendering

This morning the store was empty. Its parking lot offered numerous spaces from which to choose, and there was no line waiting to pay for items.

“You should have been here yesterday,” the cashier said as she rang up my purchase. “The lines were around the store, and people were complaining that they had no place to park.”

Yesterday I had no interest in crowded places and worked on an article that will post next week. My neighborhood was quiet, the roads were as empty as the store I went to this morning, and it felt like everything stopped.

The previous weeks were busy, and I missed the meeting in South Nyack during which the village and the Thruway Authority presented renderings for the shared use path terminus in Rockland that will open in 2018.

Good news continues for the village. To recap:

In spring 2015 the state agreed to relocate the Rockland terminus (landing point) away from residential village streets to Thruway property near Exit 10 with adjacent parking.

The above rendering, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority, is one of four presented during the November 15 meeting.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

Girder Assemblies? Check. Stay Cables? Check.

sign

Comic relief passed me in another lane today as I wondered why there was traffic on Saturday afternoon. I was in the thick of it going to Rockland and watched cars backed up to nearly White Plains on the way back.

traffic

More than 12 of the 192 stay cables, and final steel girder assemblies for the Rockland-to-Westchester span, were installed. Remaining girder assemblies for the span set to open in 2017 will be installed in the next few weeks, per a recent press release.

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On another note: those six planned belvederes/viewing areas on the shared use path are interesting; however, they don’t take into account the sun and wind. I wish they’d been planned with more practicality in mind.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

New Bridge, New Path Design, a New Beginning

main span towers

“You can’t go back and make a new start, but you can start right now and make a brand new ending.” — author James R. Sherman, Ph. D.

What an exciting time for South Nyack! After more than 60 years the village is looking forward to new possibilities as the bridge project makes — and changes — history.

Last year the state agreed to relocate the Rockland terminus (landing point) away from residential village streets to Thruway property near Exit 10 with adjacent parking.

Last week Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced that the village’s preferred option for the path’s landing, “Alternative F” at $16 million, was chosen after a thorough review of its impacts and benefits to the local communities.

Watch for an update in the July 2016 issue of Rivertown Magazine.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

Three Years, Two Months: This Time Next Year

Welcome to spring. Snow happens. I remember when this storm surprised us; I was working in the city and commuting by train. There were no shelters on the platform, nothing to shield us while we waited for the familiar sound.

This is what I refer to when I talk about protection from wind at the belvederes.

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Now that the former maintenance facility in Tarrytown — whose demise began last April — is gone, prep can begin for the new building that will occupy the site.

It’s been three years and two months since the project got its formal go-ahead. This time next year (thereabouts) we’ll be driving on the west/northbound span.

At a May 2012 meeting then-state DOT Project Director Michael Anderson said it “won’t be five years of everything,” referring to noise and construction neighbors feared would affect them, and that traffic would switch to the new bridge sometime during the fourth year.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

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