Archive for the ‘Tappan Zee Constructors LLC’ Category

Five Years Ago Today: Transit Recommendations

The jughandle turn to Route 119 is further north/Courtesy of Ian C. Ligget

Early speculation that bus rapid transit would start day one the new bridge opened in 2018 was correct, per the Final Transit Recommendations released after the final committee meeting last month in Tarrytown.

Possibly bus stops in Rockland County include: Chestnut Street Suffern, Campbell Avenue/Herrion Road Suffern, Rt. 306 Monsey, Spring Valley Transit Center, Nanuet Park & Ride, The Shops at Nanuet®, Palisades Center, Lot J, Macy’s, Nyack Hospital, Main Street, Nyack and Interchange 10 on the Thruway in South Nyack.

“It is important to note that many other transit options were considered by the (31-member) MTTF, including commuter and light rail options,” per a disclaimer. Ideas for the short-term (now through 2018), mid-term (15 years after the bridge is built), and long-term (2033 and beyond) now face land use and financial challenges.

One money source is the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) Discretionary Grant program, through which $600 million was recently made available.

While the new system changes transportation options within and between Westchester and Rockland, based on studies indicating increased commuting within counties than to New York City, “Local jurisdictions will have to be consulted about whether priority transit can be done,” ARUP engineer Trent Lethco, AICP said.

If the free WiFi, better seats and covered station stops don’t attract riders, maybe the unified fare system, or priority transit will: BRT is a guaranteed 25 percent faster on local roads, 20 percent so on I-287.

Money and time savers were music to South Nyack resident Annie Hekker Weiss, who spends two hours daily in transit to work. “That’s four extra hours every day to pay a babysitter for commuting time. Thank you for helping to figure this out for us.”

“South Nyack has been recommended for a $250,000 grant through the NNYB Community Benefit Program to study Interchange 10 and potential development opportunities surrounding it,” the summary said. Ramp metering and signal upgrades are proposed for Route 59, and a future study will decide if a new Thruway exit, Interchange 14X near Airmont/Viola/Monsey, can relieve traffic on that route.

And while the new bridge’s $300 million worth of structural strength can support future rail, there’s no place to build it — now. One short-term improvement calls for an I-287 corridor study to reserve (search for) space in case new facilities are desired. “Today there is insufficient room to allow for the introduction of new measures to improve transit or transportation performance,” the summary said.

Seven proposed routes (three between the counties, three within Westchester, and one connecting Westchester to the Bronx) will connect with transit hubs, including the Palisades Center, downtown Nyack, the Shops at Nanuet, downtown Suffern, and Westchester County Airport.

Earlier-omitted travel routes were needs were added back — Suffern-to-Yonkers via a transfer at Spring Valley, Port Chester-to-Suffern trips via a Valhalla transfer — as was Tarrytown Mayor Drew Fixell’s suggestion to revisit the Tarrytown-to-White Plains segment of I-287 see what improvements can be made.

White Plains will get a new transit hub, thanks to White Plains Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC)’s $1 million study grant. Also in mid-term plans are Exit 11 reconstruction, West-of-Hudson rail improvements, and a new in-line BRT at the Palisades Center. East-west trains, and passenger service on the West Shore line, are planned for the long-term; the groups suggested talks with NYSDOT, MTA, and New Jersey Transit.

The invisible elephant appeared when Westchester League of Conservation Voters Board Member John Nonna commented, “The level of where you set the toll will determine the level of mass transit that will be considered.”

“Who will take the initiative to make sure the recommendations will move forward?” State Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (88th District) asked. State DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald replied, “Our charge was to make recommendations. It’s up to the governor and the Thruway Authority to see what are the next steps.”

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times March 4, 2014.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Westchester Landing, Path Terminus take Shape

Landing under construction on August 2017, opening day westbound span/©J Rosman

The above photo was taken as our media bus made its way to the westbound span’s opening day ceremony 18 months ago. Check out the progress (below): crews are building foundation walls for the path terminus, building retaining walls, installing rebar and pouring concrete and filling previously dug holes (backfilling).

Shared use path Westchester landing leading to welcome center in Tarrytown/NYSTA

While construction is not visible from the road, you can’t miss the towers. Mom hasn’t driven across the bridge in nearly two years and wants to see it; the towers were topped with blue jump forms the last time she saw them (about two year ago).

Looking north where shared use path meets Westchester landing in Tarrytown/NYSTA

The bridge did open within the 62 month deadline (January 2013 to March 2018). Was the side path on the westbound span also factored into the timeline? I’m guessing not. Also scheduled to open this year are the maintenance facility, welcome center and new police barracks.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Five Years Ago Today: the Super Crane Arrived

Courtesy of Phil Little

Courtesy of Phil Little

Will Van Dorp, professor at Union County College in New Jersey, met the I Lift NY this very cold morning as it arrived from the West Coast at our very own Port Jersey Facility – The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey – escorted by tug boats Lauren Foss and Iver Foss. after docking at a private facility in Jersey City, it will stay put until it comes north to the Tappan Zee Bridge this spring.

Excitement, cameras, and (perhaps) a sigh of relief — it’s finally here — greeted the I Lift NY‘s arrival two days ago. I’m guessing the relief part.

Nowhere among the day’s pictures did I see any like the first three snapped by waterblogger Will Van Dorp; he captured I Lift NY‘s approach on the aquatic horizon, led by tugboat Lauren Foss, adding drama to suspense. Tugboat Iver Foss followed.

A New York state of mind is also apparent in these pictures taken by photographer Phil Little with the Freedom Tower and Statue of Liberty background.

Sunlight bathed the Tappan Zee bridge shortly before the I Lift NY's arrival at The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey./EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown

Sunlight bathed the Tappan Zee bridge shortly before the I Lift NY’s arrival at The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey./EarthCam® construction camera in Tarrytown

Correction: Two weeks ago prior to the original post I said the crane, owned by Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) was renamed. It wasn’t. It was dubbed, nicknamed. Long ago and far away, it was christened the “Left Coast Lifter” for its work on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge construction project. That was then, this is now.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

TZB Demolition in Real Time & in Slow Motion

In case you missed the event yesterday as I did, here it is again in real time and in slow motion courtesy of Kevin P. Coughlin/State of New York. The section looks like it’s floating on the water; however, the perfect fall caused its columns to drop to the river bottom.

Demolition experts will place charges on vertical support structures along the span of the bridge. The charges are timed to detonate in a way that will safely lower the remaining structure eastward, away from the Hudson River’s main navigation channel, according to a fact sheet released by the construction project.

Fitting it happened this month: January 2013 was when the Thruway Authority issued Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) Notice To Proceed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

TZB Anchor Span falls via Controlled Demolition

Crowds had gathered since early this morning to watch the controlled demolition of the ironic Tappan Zee Bridge. The temperate was below freezing; still, this was not to be missed despite its occurrence on a weekday morning. I’m sure motorists were annoyed that the estimated 10 a.m. explosion occurred nearly one hour later and can only imagine waiting on clogged westbound 287 in Westchester and the equally clogged eastbound Thruway in Rockland.

The above photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority shows the anchor span minutes after it fell into the Hudson River.

Demolition and salvage experts hired by Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) were in charge of the procedure. Vertical members of the span fell so the team could safely lower the span away from the main channel using specialty marine salvage equipment, per a fact sheet. Material will be removed from the river during the following weeks by mMarine salvage experts; chains on the riverbed will remove the steel and support the salvaged structure, which TZC will place on barges and remove from the site.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

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