Archive for the ‘Thruway Authority’ Category

A Full Circle Day, and in More Ways than One

Standing on steps near Quay Condominium clubhouse in Tarrytown/© Janie Rosman

People ask about photos I take and post in this blog; twice an editor asked to reprint two and paid me. Today I had a photo request from someone, and that request made me realize my reporting about the bridge project has come full circle in more ways than one.

I received an email asking about a specific blog post; the sender wanted to buy one of its photos. They were taken before I was born, I said, and I reprinted them with permission. A friend reminded me I could have gotten them from someone’s relative who worked on the first Tappan Zee Bridge in the early 1950s.

March 22, 2012, was a balmy night, too warm for a winter coat so I wore a denim jacket, a tee shirt and jeans. I’d never been to the Quay Condominium, where my editor sent me to cover a meeting/project update for residents.

New York State Thruway Authority officials got an earful that night, which began my seven-year (so far, this month) bridge reporting. Most of the photos on this blog are mine; several are from Flickr, and many are from the NYSTA. Permission is secured prior to my using them, and all are properly credited.

Looking at a very different view from the same steps a few years later/© Janie Rosman

Today’s request made me chuckle me because the person who wanted to buy one of the photos I posted of the first Tappan Zee Bridge’s construction needed them for a project with the NYSTA. I researched and guessed (my hunch was confirmed) the person’s company already had those photos . . . directly from the source.

It’s been a full circle day in more ways than one.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Pieces of TZB Steel will be used in Arts Project

See how nicely I accented winter sunsets? Thought I’d be gone forever when the new bridge opened, didn’t you? Think again!

You have not seen the last of me because there’s another contest about me! It’s been a long time coming, too, after the bridge art show was ages ago.

“Remnant steel salvaged from the retired Tappan Zee Bridge” — that’s ME! — “will be made available to the two winning artists to incorporate into their sculptures.” (This is from a press release earlier in the week.) Which pieces of me will they be?

“These future sculptures will not only enhance the new twin-span crossing but provide residents and visitors opportunities to connect with the history, culture and spirit of the beautiful Hudson Valley,” Thruway Authority Executive Director Matthew J. Driscoll said.

History, culture and spirit of the beautiful Hudson Valley = Tappan Zee Bridge.

Anyway, here’s the plan.

ArtsWestchester, the Thruway Authority and the Arts Council of Rockland seek a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) that invites artists to submit their statements, work samples and a vision statement by January 11, 2019, via https://artswestchester.org/. Artists chosen will then be invited to submit their full proposals for the sculpture in early February.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Lower Hudson Transit Link starts this Month

Above is the westbound lane (from left to right): median shoulder, next two lanes for passenger cars only, next two lanes are travel lanes (not limited to passenger vehicles), then a bus lane/emergency access lane, then a shoulder and finally the path and overlooks. Renderings are from the NYS Department of Transportation.

Red/green ramp meter signals will be installed from Exit 14A in Rockland County to Exit 4 in Westchester County and will regulate vehicular flow entering the highway to manage roadway congestion. Three will be intalled in Westchester by the end of October 2018; the others will be installed in 2019 and 2020.

A dedicated lane on each span of the new bridge can save up to five minutes on typical weekday commutes and additional time travel when there are major traffic incidents. The state police also enforce proper lane use. Look for the lane on the eastbound span at the end of this month and on the westbound span when the new path is finished in 2019.

New York State Police will enforce traffic rules at the ramp meters; drivers who fail to stop at a red ramp meter light can be fined the equivalent of a regular traffic signal violation.

For information, visit http://www.dot.ny.gov/LHTL.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Eastbound Span opens this Saturday: Lower Hudson Transit Link Routes begin October 29

GPI crew mugs for the Thruway Authority’s camera during tour of new eastbound span

Four lanes of eastbound-bound traffic will move onto the new eastbound span Friday overnight. Crews have been dismantling the Tappan Zee Bridge since it was retired last October and building the second span while the westbound span accommodated two-way traffic.

Before the end of October, the Lower Hudson Transit Link will begin commuter bus service between Rockland and Westchester counties.

Its four new bus lines between Suffern and White Plains, some with overlapping stops, include Suffern to the Palisades Center, Monsey to White Plains, and two routes from the West Nyack mall: one to the Tarrytown train station and the other to White Plains with a stop at the train station.

Transit signal priority that keep lights green when buses approach an intersection is one of several Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) improvements provided by LHTL. The system replaces the current Tappan ZEExpress lines Suffern to White Plains and Spring Valley to Tarrytown (via Nyack).

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

New York State Prepared to & Did Bridge a Gap*

One of my favorite photos from that day: two members of the construction team watch the crowds prior to the opening ceremony for the new bridge’s westbound span. It was a hot August day, and dad’s golf hat was my lucky charm.

Westbound traffic moved to that span the following night. The Tappan Zee was our eastbound ride for the next six weeks, and then — with slightly less fanfare than its earlier transition — eastbound traffic moved to the new span.

One driver’s wish came true: he was the last ride on the Tappan Zee Bridge, and we had a new eastbound ride. In early November, its first section was removed.

Less of the Tappan Zee now as sections of it are removed to be repurposed per a Thruway Authority board decision in July. Crews continue building the eastbound span and — near the Westchester landing — the new maintenance facility, new building for state police south of the Thruway and the walking and bicycle path.

With its main span towers and piers lit in lavender, the new bridge looked pretty against the oncoming late August night sky. I kept thinking, “Purple reigns on the Hudson Valley” (photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority) as I crossed the Tappan Zee Bridge westbound for the last time.

How many of you will remember 2017 as the year the Tappan Zee Bridge closed to traffic? Since last December, when the new bridge’s main span towers were completed, crews have been working toward its opening. The above-mentioned months stand out in my mind; your mileage may vary.

*Tag line for this blog is New York State Prepares to Bridge a Gap™

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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