Archive for the ‘viewing areas’ Category

Spring has Sprung: Nyack Buzzing with Activity

It was perfect weather to be outside Sunday, and Memorial Park in Nyack was packed with cars. We sat for a while under a tree — as luck would have it, there was a spot waiting for us — and took in the view.

This after checking out the Nyack Street Fair, always a fun experience.

That day marked five weeks since I was walking down steps and missed the step, falling and injuring my left knee and upper leg. Walking has become easier with cortisone shots, and I’ll be starting physical therapy next week. It was gorgeous outside, and I didn’t want to miss the day.

Birds flying everywhere, crowded viewing area, people enjoying the weather and checking out the bridge and the Spotter’s Guide and happy winter finally left. The giant crane was positioned near the Rockland shoreline, and people were taking pictures with their cell phones.

So when will the westbound span open? The summer before the project began, then state DOT Project Director Michael Anderson said traffic will switch to the new bridge sometime during the fourth year (2017).

Then we heard west/northbound traffic would move to the new span in December 2016, and two months later (February 2017) to move east/southbound traffic as well. Former Executive Director Robert L. Megna decided in early November to postpone the first opening until spring 2017.

Project officials are talking about “sometime this year.” I wonder if there are still built-in contract incentives for finishing the project before spring 2018 or penalties for completing it later? Is the bridge builder still on a 62-month schedule?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Happy Anniversary: Four Years of Blogging

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© Janie Rosman 2013

Four years ago I began writing this blog about what seemed at the time long-range plans that would “some day” materialize. And now, “some day” is here.

Six hundred ninety-three posts — in addition to countless newspaper and magazine articles — later, I still have mixed feelings about the project. It’s exciting to watch from afar and to cover, and it was an adventure to stand on the new westbound span last December. This area will change forever and will have a safer, more efficient crossing, both badly needed.

Aerial view of new/current spans/(Kevin P. Coughlin/Office of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo)

However, unless the highway on both sides of the river is also revamped, I foresee gridlock as more cars pour off the bridge in both Westchester and Rockland.

I’m still wondering about the shared use path. Without it, the state would have a majestic new bridge minus the added situations the path is creating. Three years ago I wrote that the belevederes, while interesting, gave little thought to practicality or to those who would use the path. Perhaps there’s still time to add shade.

Educational outreach’s fourth year at White Plains Engineering Expo/© Janie Rosman 2017

One official associated with the project joked last year the state could make money by selling soda, iced tea and water at the viewing areas because people may forget to bring hydration. That’s a good idea: remember, you read it here.

The Peregrine falcons are popular, and everyone wants to know where they are. Type “peregrine” into the search box to bring up falcon-related posts. This photo of their nesting box was taken about two years ago, when the bridge was a skeleton in the river.

Secret revealed! When in New York, they live here on the bridge’s northwest side./NYSTA

Less than eight weeks before the Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge opened, my parents got married. Directions to Lake Placid — where they honeymooned — from New York and New Jersey begin with “Take the NY State Thruway (I-87) north . . .” The new bridge was to open in two months; the Taconic State Parkway was “it” back then, mom said.

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This year part of “some day” comes to fruition: two-way traffic will switch to the new westbound span, and the current bridge will be dismantled so the eastbound span can be completed and connected to the landings. They said everything that’s supposed to be completed by 2018 will be finished. So be it!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spring: it Really IS Peeking around the Corner

My cousin Russ grew up in New York and has been living on the West Coast since I don’t remember how long. Some years back he visited for a few days. A history buff, he suggested we suggested we see “Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure” (2001). I wasn’t familiar with Shackleton and walked out of the theater amazed at his courage and determination. If you haven’t seen this seat-gripping film about his landmark expedition, then I suggest adding it to your list.

Big reach here: despite this winter’s bone-chilling temps the bridge project progressed, and classes that scheduled presentations these past few months often got more than they bargained for: outdoors, learning about the project where, right behind them in the river, crews worked despite the elements.

I don’t like cold and don’t take to it well; however, I make exceptions when the activity outweighs the weather . . . for an exciting day on the westbound span during the towers’ topping off ceremony in December. Whether you’re in the elements to work on the project or to visit it, bravo!

Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Another gantry added to the Westbound Span

hidden-tunnel

Took a blog hiatus and am back! Here’s where I temporarily disappeared.

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Last week crews installed the second of eight overhead gantries on the Rockland side of the westbound span.  Ten gantries will be installed on the eastbound span, 18 in all.

Meantime, here are sights from en route to the edge of the westbound span.

sup-abutment

We passed the shared use path abutment on the Westchester landing . . .

expansion-joint

. . . and workers installing an expansion joint connecting road deck panels.

location-marking

This is a location marker for guess which belvedere of the shared use path?

sup-wall-structure

Terrific view of the Rockland shoreline backdrops steel rebar structure for beginnings of what will be a concrete retaining wall for the shared use path.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Now and Then and a Changing Hudson Valley

kids-at-viewing-area

This year the first span opens, and the Hudson Valley will again change. I love this photo of the kids looking at the construction and see it symbolizing the future, their future, as the figure below imagined his future years before.

Craig Long, historian for the Villages of Suffern and Montebello and the Town of Ramapo, discussed previous ideas for a Hudson River crossing last summer.

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

I focused on his narrative about Nanuet Assemblyman Fred Horn, the “Father of the Bridge,” who rallied for one-quarter century for such a project.

Long said a bridge (railroad) was proposed from Piermont to Hastings as early 1905 with calls continuing for the next 20 or so years. It gained traction, he said, when Horn took office, proposing a bill in 1930 for a bridge from Piermont to Hastings with Hook Mountain and Rockland Lake as other locations.

During the next two years Horn proposed a bridge, then a bridge/tunnel from Snedens Landing to Dobb’s Ferry.

Here’s where the sparks begin to fly.

thenGood idea except the proposed site was within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s 25-mile jurisdiction, and it would need to approve, and then, operate the project. The proposals failed as did Horn when he ran for re-election.

“In 1935, the Rockland Causeway-Tunnel Authority was created with a drive to bridge the Hudson from Nyack to Tarrytown,” Long said in an email. “As studies begin, no determination is made as to whether Upper Nyack, Nyack, or South Nyack will be the bridge’s terminus. In August of that year, it is central Nyack; by October it is South Nyack, Voorhis Point.

tzb-signThe following March (1936) Grand View was chosen as a potential landing site; by August the War Department approved it and Tarrytown on the Westchester side. While Hook Mountain again a choice the northern location didn’t sit well with Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader, who gained support for nixing the idea, or with residents.

Long wrote, “In October of that year, the Journal News took a straw poll on the idea of a Hudson River crossing and where it should be located” with an unscientific tally of 792 in favor and 405 opposed. Grand View was the favored location 391 votes (not residents). Results from boring led the state to abandon the project one month later. Last fall marked 80 years since that straw poll.

Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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