Archive for the ‘Bridge Art Show’ Tag

On A Bus Home, Accompanied by Springsteen

Especially significant to the artist: her watercolor painting "Coming home on the Tappan Zee" /© Donna Davies Timm

Especially significant to the artist: her watercolor painting “Coming home on the Tappan Zee” /© Donna Davies Timm

October 1975. “Born to Run” is blasting on the bus radio, as we Westchesterites and Long Islanders fly through Rockland County. The SUCO bus left Oneonta at 4 p.m., and we’re due to arrive at the County Center at 8:30 p.m.

Then we see it, the Tappan Zee Bridge. While I’m glad to be back for the weekend — and looking forward to catching up with friends I’ve not seen in two months — I’m unprepared for the little shiver that runs through me.

I chose the upstate New York college for its nutrition program, then wondered what made me think chemistry would be easier than in high school? The following year I transferred to community college, switched majors, and worked part-time.

The bridge was nearly 20, the average age on that bus; Bruce, not much older. Here’s how the view will change next month.

Westbound on the Tappan Zee Bridge, circa July 2008/Courtesy of Ian C. Ligget

If I were a painter, my canvas would show the inside of that chartered bus, where you step up into seats on either side of the aisle; above them, compartments hold luggage and coats. In those seats, some teenagers are dozing, some are watching the bridge — illuminated against the dark sky — move closer, others are belting out, “Tramps like us baby we were born to run!”

Initially posted three years ago, one month before the Bridge Art Show opened.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017 (originally 2014)

Throwback Thursday and the Bridge Art Show

Color in motion: one artist's image/New NY Bridge Outreach

Color in motion: one artist’s image/New NY Bridge Outreach

Two years ago on this day I wrote about the 2014 Bridge Art Show and interviewed artist Jodi Harvey-Brown. If you attended either packed opening at Nyack’s First Friday or the following week in Tarrytown, then you may have seen “Imagination’s Journey,” a sculpture of the new bridge she created from a book and specifically for the show.

Abundant colors from this vantage/© Janie Rosman 2014

Abundant colors from this vantage/© Janie Rosman 2014

Both Outreach Centers display art from the show — interpretations of the current or new bridge — as the project makes art in the water. Maybe I’m the only one who thinks the new bridge and the equipment used to build it are colorful.

That said, construction crews continue (say that three times fast) to install the bright blue structural steel girders for the Rockland approach. No doubt you’ve seen them near the Westchester side as well.

Bet you didn’t think two years would slip by so quickly. Neither did I.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

Here’s What Happened Six Months Ago Today . . .

The Outreach Centers were being readied for the upcoming bridge art show; a few pieces of art remain in Tarrytown and in Nyack.

Also this week: another project milestone, the start of pile cap installation.

* * * * *

Arts in the region “brings us closer to our neighbors on the other side of the bridge,” ArtsWestchester CEO Janet Langsam said. “Artists love to draw the bridge: it’s symbolic of connections and metaphorically working together.”

"Tappan Zee Bridge and Lighthouse"/© Ylli Haruni

“Tappan Zee Bridge and Lighthouse”/© Ylli Haruni

Beautiful and intriguing, the scenery has long been a subject for artists; though it’s changing, fascination continues.

As a way to link the bridge project to creative populations in Nyack and Tarrytown, officials invited painters photographers and sculptors to send their interpretations of the three-mile span — new design or current — to the 2014 Bridge Art Show, a collaboration with ArtsWestchester, Rockland Center for the Arts, Rivertown Artists Workshop, and Nyack Art Collective.

“This is a nice way to join the Westchester and Rockland arts communities,” RoCA Executive Director Julianne Ramos agreed. “Artists appreciate the opportunity to say they were in a show, and have their work recognized.”

The response was overwhelmingly positive.

Foggy night, Tappan Zee Bridge/ ©2011 Ali Perretz

Foggy night, Tappan Zee Bridge/ ©2011 Ali Perretz

Photography, paintings — watercolor, oil, acrylic — and sculpture: 52 entries from Westchester and Rockland Counties, two from Connecticut, one from Pennsylvania, and one from New York City were submitted electronically within two months. A few people inquired after the final date (July 31) if they missed the deadline, which indicates the enthusiasm and interest in very idea.

All submissions were reviewed and accepted; artists received congratulatory letters asking them to bring their display-ready work to the Community Outreach Centers by August 24. The project’s Visual Quality Panel — including RoCA Board of Directors President Robert L. Fellows — will review all entries and select a Best of Show and two runners-up.

“Art is your interpretation. I see things as I believe other people see them, NAC member Ken Burns said. “It’s a creative idea to have this show, and I feel people will be interested in seeing it.”

Encaustic painting: "Rainy Afternoon on the Tappan Zee Bridge"/© Heather Leigh Douglas, 2012

Encaustic painting: “Rainy Afternoon on the Tappan Zee Bridge”/© Heather Leigh Douglas, 2012

Engaging and connecting neighbors, comparing and appreciating how they see a shared focus.

The original idea was to display work from Westchester artists in Rockland, and
vice versa, to stimulate a connection between them, to promote economic development, and to open horizons for each to visit the other’s county.

RAW Co-Director/Founder Naomi Vladeck felt the group’s establishment in the Sleepy Hollow cultural community is a bonus. RAW advocates for local artists to demonstrate their performance work, “(And) we’ve met a lot of visual artists doing that,” she said.

“Collaborating with local arts groups helped link the New NY Bridge project directly to the extremely talented artist community here in the Hudson Valley, and create even more excitement and interest in this historic project. The 2014 Bridge Art Show has proven to be extremely popular and we look forward to displaying the 50-plus submissions at our Community Outreach Centers in Nyack and Tarrytown next month.” — Brian Conybeare, Special Project Advisor to Governor Andrew Cuomo

Get ready for a post-Labor Day grand opening of a unique show that will run for two months at 142 Main St., Nyack, and at 303 S. Broadway, Tarrytown. Both Centers are open Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Psst. Word has it a book sculpture of the bridge was especially created for this show. Which one? We’ll have to wait and see.

These Hudson Valley artists might spark a memory or two, or show you a new vision, or the familiar in a new light. And who knows? Perhaps this show will set a precedent. All art is for sale, too, so if a specific work catches your eye, say so.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

Recapping 2014: Condensed Year in Review

This year continued the celebration from December 2013, when Thruway Authority Executive Director Thomas J. Madison closed the deal on a generous TIFIA loan, and the Left Coast Lifter waved — if it can limbo under our bridge, then it can wave — goodbye to California, ready for its 6,000-mile trip to New York Harbor.

Massive crane leaving CA for New York/Jacob Tanenbaum

Massive crane leaving CA for New York/Jacob Tanenbaum

Rumor has it the state renamed the crane I Lift NY due to this blog post.

While super crane was shimmying through the Panama Canal, Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) began its second year on the clock, our toes froze, and the Mass Transit Task force was one meeting away from our travel futures. A monorail would have been fun.

Yikes! It was cold. Frozen river? No problem, tweeted project officials (pic.twitter.com/M6vFOHYdBQ), and before January ended, the super crane arrived.

by justin sullivan

February opened with name-calling: the crane had a new moniker, and folks debated about a legendary folk singer. New safety warnings were issued, the state police and Thruway Authority relocated, and then came the final Mass Transit Task Force meeting. C’mon, you knew it’d be bus rapid transit.

The morning before it, my dear, sweet father passed away in his sleep. I love you and miss you very much, dad. You may have been there, too, because more cake than I ate was missing from my plate. Dad loved cake. Thank you to friends who were there for mom and me that night, throughout the weekend to his funeral, and this past year.

new RNA safety zone

March told us Ramp E in Tarrytown would close for the second time. Mid-month brought annual meetings in both counties and new boater safety regulations. Days later, when another barge escaped, the bridge builder addressed the issue and paid stiff fines.

In April we got money for those transit plans. The Tarrytown Outreach Center relocated, and President Barack Obama and Governor Andrew Cuomo came to town in May. Some construction vessels were now tracked via GPS, and the Outreach Team visited marinas as boating season opened.

Steel piles are ready to be capped/© Janie Rosman 2014

Steel piles are ready to be capped/© Janie Rosman 2014

June announced the 2014 Bridge Art Show. It’s bye-bye to the Rockland landing, and the start of main span pile cap construction. Need funding? How about a $500M loan from CWSRF? The project team sent emergency supplies to Delaware, and EFC approved the money.

A quiet July 4th weekend was followed by stricter safety measures. The Thruway Authority got half of the $511 million, and concrete technology arrived on the Hudson. Piermont boaters now have a safe passage to the main channel, pile cap installation began, and then came a detour.

Opening night: admiring Westchester and Rockland artists’ depictions of the current and future bridge/NNYB Outreach

Opening night: admiring Westchester and Rockland artists’ depictions of the current and future bridge/NNYB Outreach

Another project first: the 2014 Bridge Art Show opened at Nyack First Friday and debuted in Tarrytown the next week, thanks to collaborating groups. Rebar alert per NNYB, and you know the loan that came through? No, no, the EPA said. Educational outreach began its second year, there were lane shifts for construction, and the viewing areas started to take shape.

October brought Cuomo’s Build NY Initiative, and the governor was in Piermont to welcome the crane. Team Outreach celebrated Halloween bridge-style, and a new electronic highway sign was tested.

Two of the new bridge's 86 vertical steel towers seen near the Westchester approach span/NNYB Outreach

Two of the new bridge’s 86 vertical steel towers seen near the Westchester approach span/NNYB Outreach

Several lane closures in November, when the state told the EPA, See you in court. The first two pier towers were completed, and more criticism about the bridge finances from an oversight office. TZC’s president received the “Good Scout” award, and South Nyack asked the governor for help.

Detours, lane closures, and more lane closures kicked off December, and the bridge had a birthday! A mid-month accident — thankfully, no one was hurt — temporarily halted cement production and not the project, which soon begins its third year.

Did I miss something? I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

Creative Halloween Fun w/Variations on a Bridge

Why wait for 2018? Tarrytown's Halloween parade had its own NNYB, designed and built by David Titcomb aided by Mary Kohrherr, Amy Bender, Anita McGovern, Sheila Sullivan, Nancy Zallo, Chris Swenson and Kyle McGovern/Photo: MK

Why wait for 2018? Tarrytown’s Halloween parade had its own NNYB, designed and built by David Titcomb aided by Mary Kohrherr, Amy Bender, Anita McGovern, Sheila Sullivan, Nancy Zallo, Chris Swenson and Kyle McGovern/Photo: MK

Did you see the awesome Halloween doings in the villages — Tarrytown, Sleepy Hollow and Nyack — last weekend? If you did, then you caught some of the unique bridge designs, like the one fashioned by David Titcomb. No worries if you missed them; you can see the Bridge Art Show in the Outreach Centers — 142 Main St., Nyack, and at 303 S. Broadway, Tarrytown — through Friday. Hours are Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. While there, watch the video and pose by the pilings.

Seen on the street in Nyack last weekend, the Tappan Zee Bridge was aglow with lights and gauze/NNYB Outreach

Seen on the street in Nyack last weekend, the Tappan Zee Bridge was aglow with lights and gauze/NNYB Outreach

While the weekend was fun, the new week brings traffic alerts. Coming up: two- and three-lane closures on I-87/I-287 northbound for paving near Exit 9 and the toll plaza. They’re detailed in the latest press release, as are the new electronic highway signs and boater safety. Since August, six lighted channel markers have guided them to and from the Piermont shore. Off-limits is the U.S. Coast Guard’s Safety Zone; know the expanded Regulated Navigation Area (RNA).

Bridge at Nyack Outreach Center/NNYB

Bridge at Nyack Outreach Center/NNYB

Who besides me has been checking the river for super crane sightings? The lane shifts and slower speeds gave me time to see what’s doing in the water (as far as I could see since I’m short).

More vessels so be aware. Safe boating, everyone.

Though it’s nearly Halloween, folks are on the water; heed restrictions. Check out the Coast Guard’s weekly Local Notice to Mariners, excerpted and in its entirety, listed under Boater Safety Information on the project’s website. A LNM primer is here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2014

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