Archive for the ‘crossbeams’ Tag

Road Trip includes Glimpses of NNYB Progress

What’s a trip north without checking out the replacement for the bridge I shall miss? Yes, I admit it. Since it was Sunday, and there was no traffic, I had a chance to see foundations for the new maintenance facility at the Westchester landing. Did I mention there was no traffic?

I also got another look at the scaffolding climbed by one adventurous project official. Remember, the stairs begin above the crossover bridge and are outside one of the 419-foot tall main span towers. Click the photo enlarge it, and then click the magnifier for an up-close view of what it’s like to climb up the tower.

Cloudy skies on the way were foreboding and very different from a similar trip last April; they made a pretty picture, almost like a painting on canvas. While the day was overcast, last weekend’s skies were clear and beautiful when Flying Films NY traveled to the project site for these aerial views.

Stay safe this Memorial Day and remember to show gratitude and be thankful.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spectacular view from There: on top of a Tower

You know the radio station whose broadcasting promo says it’s from the top top top top top top top of the Empire State Building? While scaffolding is still in place, one project official also went to the top: of one tower.

He rode an elevator to its 280-foot view (crossover bridge) and then walked steps on the outside of that tower to its tippy-top. Photos courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Whoosh! Here’s his magnificent view from high above the Hudson Valley:

Facing north: one of the new main span towers high above the Hudson River/©H. Jackson

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Now and Then and a Changing Hudson Valley

kids-at-viewing-area

This year the first span opens, and the Hudson Valley will again change. I love this photo of the kids looking at the construction and see it symbolizing the future, their future, as the figure below imagined his future years before.

Craig Long, historian for the Villages of Suffern and Montebello and the Town of Ramapo, discussed previous ideas for a Hudson River crossing last summer.

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

I focused on his narrative about Nanuet Assemblyman Fred Horn, the “Father of the Bridge,” who rallied for one-quarter century for such a project.

Long said a bridge (railroad) was proposed from Piermont to Hastings as early as 1905 with calls continuing for the next 20 or so years. It gained traction, he said, when Horn took office, proposing a bill in 1930 for a bridge from Piermont to Hastings with Hook Mountain and Rockland Lake as other locations.

During the next two years Horn proposed a bridge, then a bridge/tunnel from Snedens Landing to Dobb’s Ferry.

Here’s where the sparks begin to fly.

thenGood idea except the proposed site was within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s 25-mile jurisdiction, and it would need to approve, and then, operate the project. The proposals failed as did Horn when he ran for re-election.

“In 1935, the Rockland Causeway-Tunnel Authority was created with a drive to bridge the Hudson from Nyack to Tarrytown,” Long said in an email. “As studies begin, no determination is made as to whether Upper Nyack, Nyack, or South Nyack will be the bridge’s terminus. In August of that year, it is central Nyack; by October it is South Nyack, Voorhis Point.”

tzb-signThe following March (1936) Grand View was chosen as a potential landing site; by August the War Department approved it and Tarrytown on the Westchester side. While Hook Mountain again a choice the northern location didn’t sit well with Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader, who gained support for nixing the idea, or with residents.

Long wrote, “In October of that year, the Journal News took a straw poll on the idea of a Hudson River crossing and where it should be located” with an unscientific tally of 792 in favor and 405 opposed. Grand View was the favored location 391 votes (not residents). Results from boring led the state to abandon the project one month later. Last fall marked 80 years since that straw poll.

Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Throwback Thursday: Then to Later to Now

Side by side are current bridge and new main span towers alight in the river/© H. Jackson

Side by side are current bridge and new main span towers alight in the river/© H. Jackson

So much awesomeness — it’s not a word; I’m taking editorial liberties — on this project to sort through this year. Two articles in Rivertown Magazine (July and December issues) covered activities through November with a look-see for coming months; here are some notable events from 2016 and earlier.

The first main span crossbeam was set in place, consultants hired by South Nyack presented plans for redeveloping land near Exit 10, the 1,000th road deck panel was placed, the bridge builder was recognized for its excellent safety record, one of the cranes collapsed mid-summer, and the first stay cables were installed days later.

scouting for POTUS visit

Watching the police scout the area with dogs prior to President Obama’s arrival (May 2014) was fascinating . . and then I heard the president’s voice via microphone at Sunset Cove Restaurant.

When the Secret Service asked us to place our belongings in a line and then step back, I forgot I’d left my pocketbook open after putting my ID into my wallet and placing that into my pocketbook. Too late. “Step back!” the agent barked at me as dogs began sniffing our cameras, bags, backpacks, etc.

The super crane arrived here — and Governor Cuomo welcomed it — that fall; two calendar turns later the project reached another milestone: the towers were completed.

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© J. Rosman 2013

Few thought the bridge would reach 60; it won’t see a 62nd year. With the eight towers complete, the self-climbing forms being removed, stay cables being added and space lessening between the westbound main span and the Westchester and Rockland approach spans, its days are numbered.

During the ride to to Nyack last week for copies of the December issue I told mom to watch for a sign to her right. I saw it and pointed, and she giggled. It remains to be seen if it will have a place on the new bridge, and if so, then where?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

From Afar at Night and Daytime Close-ups

Recently-installed stay cables support roadway and look delicate at midnight (EarthCam®).

Recently-installed stay cables support roadway and look delicate at midnight (EarthCam®).

A reporter who has covered the project for nearly five years (since March 2012), I’ve been invited to several educational outreach presentations for different grades. The presentation at Hudson Valley P-TECH clicked, as I told you last week.

Now in the fourth year of construction, the corresponding presentation — geared to audience levels — focused on the main span towers and roadway and stay cables with a bit of project history.

anchor-pier

No fear of heights: @NewNYBridge tweeted this view from an anchor pier near the Westchester shoreline. Note: that’s equipment and not a worker at the bottom. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

concrete-deci-panels

All we see from the road are blue girders; atop them are concrete deck panels  and closures between them. They look a lot larger than from the car!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

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