Archive for the ‘deck panels’ Tag

Work Done, Super Crane departed Project Site

I Lift NY arriving at its destination/© Janie Rosman 2014

It arrived with great fanfare five years ago and left quietly last weekend. Its work on the project completed, the I Lift NY headed downriver accompanied by three tugboats. The photo below is from a video captured by Felice Ehrlich.

Some stats:

Its lifting Capacity is 1,929 tons, and its boom length is 328 feet. It raised 140 steel girder assemblies, four main span crossbeams, and 120 road deck panels.

First lift was April 2015
Placed first girder in June 2015
Removed first section of TZB in Nov. 2017
Final lift was May 2019

Click here for super crane history and trivia and here for more project details. Curious as to why it had three tugboat escorts.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Throwback Thursday: Deck Panel Installation

This time last year:

Crews continue to set precast concrete deck panels atop the steel girders, install rebar, pour concrete and ready the driving surface of the eastbound span. This is what the westbound span looked like before its final driving surface was applied. Deck panels were interlocked via their hairpin reinforcing steel bars; the spaces between them were closed with reinforcing concrete.

They’re doing other work, too, including removing sections of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Their order is the section south of the center, a cantilever truss weighing 4,560 tons; strand jacks will then help lower the main span section closest to Westchester, an anchor span weighing 5,350 tons, onto barges. Then comes the section south of the center, followed by the section closest to Rockland.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

All 135 TZB Deck Panels at New Locations

More Tappan Zee Bridge deck panels were delivered today to nine municipalities throughout the state for immediate and future infrastructure proejcts. They’d make huge paperweights as they weigh between 75,000 and 110,000 pounds each and are 50 feet long. Photos are courtesy of @nygovcuomo.

Today completed delivery of all 135 panels — made available after the new bridge’s westbound span opened this time last year — that have a combined estimated value of approximately $4.1 million.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Fewer Expansion Joints ensure a Smoother Ride

These are the expansion joints — one of 12 such joints on the westbound span that absorb the bridge’s steel and concrete slight expansions and contractions — I photographed that freezing December day, when media got its first look at the westbound span, and when the main span towers were completed.

Same for the eastbound span in the above photo, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority. So while crews are pouring concrete between the deck panels on some parts of the span, they’re installing joints in other areas of it.

Deck panel installation for that span and its 11 joints was completed earlier this month. South of the new span (below), Tappan Zee Bridge pile caps and piles await removal. Photos are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

It nearly 200 expansion joints made for noisy and bumpy rides, sometimes in sync to songs on the radio.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Concrete Pours continue on Soon-to-Open Span

Remember these? They’re deck panels at the Westchester landing months earlier. The same way kids’ toys interlock, these hairpin reinforcing steel bars connect deck panels to each other. Reinforcing concrete will be poured between the spaces (around the steel) prior to the final driving surface. Photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Enlarged photo of Westchester landing, where crews are pouring cement closures after deck panels were installed /Kevin Coughlin/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

The other day someone asked me why the Tappan Zee Bridge couldn’t be used as a bridge park. One look at the section below from the same photo will answer his question.

People ask why the Tappan Zee Bridge cannot become a bridge park. The reason: no way to connect it to land /Kevin Coughlin/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

You can see that the new westbound span and in-progress eastbound span are connected to the Westchester landing, and the piers of the Tappan Zee Bridge are hanging out in the river. How would people access the bridge park if there’s no connection to land?

Westchester and Rockland have plenty of beautiful riverside parks to enjoy. I disagreed with the idea for a bridge park, namely for safety and lack of feasibility. There’s a way to enjoy the river view from the new bridge when the side path opens in 2019.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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