Archive for the ‘deck panels’ Tag

Going, Going . . . more sections of TZB are Gone

Something happens one day a week that results in interesting information and pictures for those of us who weren’t invited to attend. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

How cool that the Tappan Zee Bridge will continue in spirit, recycled into parts for use elsewhere. How disappointing that we’re not alerted to exactly when the super crane will remove a section of it so we can watch. Many folks remember watching it being built so why not let us know when part of it will be removed?

Exactly how much of the bridge has disappeared so far? Looks like quite a bit of concrete road deck and structural steel are gone from both the Westchester and Rockland approach spans.

This weekly adventure looks like fun. We get to watch as the almost-made-it-to-62-years-old bridge spanning one of the widest Hudson River locations vanishes.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Second TZ Section, this over Metro-North, Gone

You may recall when the first girder assembly was pushed over the Hudson Line train tracks to the first set of piersPhotos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

This was followed by the second and third girder installations. Each time, Metro-North adjusted its schedule to accommodate the maneuvers.

Last Friday night, the super crane removed a second section of steel, this above the Metro-North tracks, and schedules were accommodated.

Such is the start of the changing view that will slowly evolve during the next year.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Super Crane removes first section of Tappan Zee

Another moment in history: the super crane’s first lift in a year-long process of dismantling the Tappan Zee Bridge. One hundred thirty-three deck panels and two moveable barrier machines will be sent to nearly 12 state and local municipalities.

Twenty-nine months ago the giant crane lifted its first set of structural steel girders onto piers for the new bridge near the Rockland shoreline.

Below is a cross-section of the Tappan Zee Bridge’s Westchester approach span, a little like when someone cuts into a sheet cake and lifts out a precise piece.

Eight local munis and the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) asked for desk panels, valued at nearly $3 million including removal and delivery. Details here. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

Each of those panels — in use until last month —  is approximately 13 feet wide by 50 feet long, 8.25 inches thick and approximately between 75,500-86,500 pounds.

The moveable barrier system will head to the New York City Department of Transportation. To learn about the bridge that will slowly disappear, click here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Bridge Progress and Four Years in Two Minutes

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Taking a look back two years ago when the main span towers were beginning. Here are the past four years in two minutes courtesy of the project team.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Parts of the Tappan Zee will be Repurposed

Tappan Zee Bridge/Courtesy of Severin St. Martin

At Monday’s Thruway Authority Board of Directors meeting, members approved parts of the Tappan Zee Bridge for state and local municipalities.

One hundred thirty-three deck panels and two moveable barrier machines will be sent to nearly 12 state and local municipalities.

Eight local munis and the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) asked for desk panels, valued at nearly $3 million including removal and delivery.

How about the deck panels we drive across each day? Each is approximately 13 feet wide by 50 feet long, 8.25 inches thick and approximately between 75,500-86,500 pounds.

Want to know more about the bridge that will soon be gone? Read about it here.

As for the moveable barrier system, it will head to the New York City Department of Transportation. Full press release with details is here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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