Archive for the ‘Esposito Trail’ Tag

Perfect Day to walk on the newly-opened Path

It was a beautiful day for a walk across the new bridge’s path. It was also very hot, sometimes windy, and never boring during my nearly two-hour journey. I left my car at the South Nyack landing and walked to Tarrytown, stopping to take pictures of the bridge and the gorgeous river views.

The Hudson Link driver who picked me up in Tarrytown didn’t stop at the South Nyack landing so I asked him to let me out at the entrance to the Esposito Trail. I walked back to where the spur path met the bridge path and then to the landing. Probably walked more than four miles total.

Remember I wrote about practicing for this walk and that my new hip joint can do this? During the past week I walked less than a mile and a half at one time and was tired from the walk. However, today’s trip was different: the path wasn’t hard under my feet like concrete is and was only challenging at times because of the heat.

Less than one mile to the landing per the above sign! After I passed the sixth overlook and felt the bridge slope toward Tarrytown (it’s an incline westbound) I began humming the theme song from Rocky. I did it!

Of the many exciting experiences covering this project for nearly seven years, I’d say today’s walk was on par with the main span towers’ topping off ceremony and the westbound span opening.

More posts and photos to come. I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Same Trail, Different Look and New Reminders

After being on PAUSE for nearly three months, we’ll certainly be able to YIELD. And if anyone forgets, the word is underfoot in several places as a reminder. A sign at the street entrance tells people to stay six feet apart.

Doubtful people will forget. This afternoon I walked on the spur path and the Esposito Trail and saw some people wearing masks, some weren’t, everyone was friendly, a few waved hello. A bicyclist who was behind me said “excuse me” so he could pass. More people were on the new path than were on the trail.

“When is this going to open?” asked one lady, waving hello as we passed. She was walking on the trail; I’d just stepped aside to let the bicyclist pass. “No one told us anything.”

Another bicyclist stopped by the spur path entrance. “I wish this was open.” Both it and the entrance to new steps leading to Village Hall were blocked. “I think people using it will be respectful of each other,” he said when I mentioned the path is less than 12 feet wide. “I think we’ll all be careful.” The word YIELD was painted on the other side of the orange barriers, where the bridge and spur paths meet.

Here is a closer view of both where they meet at the bridge path. If you click on the photo and again click on the tiny magnifying circle, then you can see them closely. Mom will not be able to see the art on the underpass walls because the spur path’s initial incline is too steep to safely navigate her wheelchair.

There were three swing gates at the street entrance, too. I wonder how someone in a wheelchair or who uses a motorized scooter will be able to navigate it.

While the path’s overlooks, Welcome Centers and art placed along the way are nice touches, what would the original Tappan Zee Bridge builders think if they saw the new bridge and its tourist enticements? The design is modern, the new name removed history, and a neighborhood is forever changed again.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Accessing New Path from the Rockland Landing

THE FLUX OF BEING (Chris Soria, Nyack) Mural

The new path will have colorful murals under the South Broadway underpass. For someone like my mom, who is in a wheelchair, how to see the art? It looks like a precarious route from the South Nyack landing’s parking lot.

The spur path behind the Village Hall this be an alternative way for her, and others who are wheelchair-bound, to access and view this mural. The only rendering that shows someone in a wheelchair is close to the Tarrytown landing at street level.

Ramp behind South Nyack Village hall leads to path, trail/courtesy of @BikeTarrytown

Path accessibility from the Rockland landing may be challenging for people who are in wheelchairs like my mom; an entrance closer to river level would have been more convenient. It looks like a big push to the spur path and a steep decline for a wheelchair.

Residents’ resistance resulted in the state moving the terminus to its land at Exit 10, and the village determined to prevent outsiders from parking on its streets to access the spur path.

We’ll see what happens when it opens.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Making a Neighborhood Trail into a Tourist Site

During Friday’s conversation the project official said the art will be a destination for people who visit from the city or other parts of the county. Perhaps.

When I noted one artist from Rockland was chosen, and none is from Westchester, he said there was a lengthy selection process, and wouldn’t I agree that the best artists live in or near the city?

No, I told him. I disagree.

TAPPAN ZEE (Ilan Averbuch, Long Island City) Sculpture

The above sculpture “pays homage to the Native American Lenape and their history along the Hudson River, while also symbolizing the value of collaboration in crossing rivers, building communities, and reaching new horizons,” the press release said.

I hope New York State’s next governor will consider paying homage to their history along the Hudson River by restoring the name Tappan Zee to the new bridge.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Second Outreach Center Closes; SUP Progressing

There’s an empty space on Main Street in Nyack, where one Outreach Center had been since early 2013. If you thought they posed with a cross steel section of pile for a reason, then you were right. It was moving out day; both Centers are now part of the project’s history (Tarrytown closed last year).

I parked on Clinton Avenue to see the Esposito Trail and side path, separated by a divider and newly-planted young trees (November 15 per the tags around those I checked). A young boy was bicycling in the center of the trail while his father ran in the center of the new spur path.

Local cycling groups want the path open 24/7, claiming it’s a transportation mode to which they need uninterrupted access. Hours have not been decided.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

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