Archive for the ‘I Lift NY’ Tag

Second TZ Section, this over Metro-North, Gone

You may recall when the first girder assembly was pushed over the Hudson Line train tracks to the first set of piersPhotos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

This was followed by the second and third girder installations. Each time, Metro-North adjusted its schedule to accommodate the maneuvers.

Last Friday night, the super crane removed a second section of steel, this above the Metro-North tracks, and schedules were accommodated.

Such is the start of the changing view that will slowly evolve during the next year.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Super Crane removes first section of Tappan Zee

Another moment in history: the super crane’s first lift in a year-long process of dismantling the Tappan Zee Bridge. One hundred thirty-three deck panels and two moveable barrier machines will be sent to nearly 12 state and local municipalities.

Twenty-nine months ago the giant crane lifted its first set of structural steel girders onto piers for the new bridge near the Rockland shoreline.

Below is a cross-section of the Tappan Zee Bridge’s Westchester approach span, a little like when someone cuts into a sheet cake and lifts out a precise piece.

Eight local munis and the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) asked for desk panels, valued at nearly $3 million including removal and delivery. Details here. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

Each of those panels — in use until last month —  is approximately 13 feet wide by 50 feet long, 8.25 inches thick and approximately between 75,500-86,500 pounds.

The moveable barrier system will head to the New York City Department of Transportation. To learn about the bridge that will slowly disappear, click here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Super Crane Limbos Again — under Three Spans

There’s something a little different about this photo . . . /EarthCam® construction camera

Have you figured out what’s different about this photo? C’mon, you must have guessed. Here’s another hint from 14 hours earlier in the day.

Now you see it, now you don’t: super crane has moved!/EarthCam® construction camera

The project team kept silent about a certain three-span maneuver (focusing our attention on other doings); your intrepid reporter received a tip.

Back on the southern side 31 months after arriving here/EarthCam® construction camera

No crane in sight, and then it appeared on the other side of the Tappan Zee. Thank you to the source who alerted me yesterday afternoon.

Crane clears the Tappan Zee Bridge/© Janie Rosman 2014

It must have been tricky since the two new spans are considerably higher than the current bridge. You remember the planning involved last time, right? It limboed under the bridge — aided by extra low tide that added an extra foot or two of clearance — two days after its arrival.

With that in mind, the unspoken question on many people’s minds is, “When?”

If the original plans had been followed, then the westbound span would have opened in late 2016: west/northbound traffic was to have moved to the new span in December, and two months later, in February 2017, east/southbound traffic was to have moved to that span.

Hmm.

I recall hearing the bridge builder has incentives for completing the full bridge and all its accents by March/April 2018, and there would be penalties “if the Thruway Authority isn’t handed the keys to the new bridge by that date or if it’s completed even one day later.”

Said by a source working on the project. Were these guidelines abandoned?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spring has Sprung: Nyack Buzzing with Activity

It was perfect weather to be outside Sunday, and Memorial Park in Nyack was packed with cars. We sat for a while under a tree — as luck would have it, there was a spot waiting for us — and took in the view.

This after checking out the Nyack Street Fair, always a fun experience.

That day marked five weeks since I was walking down steps and missed the step, falling and injuring my left knee and upper leg. Walking has become easier with cortisone shots, and I’ll be starting physical therapy next week. It was gorgeous outside, and I didn’t want to miss the day.

Birds flying everywhere, crowded viewing area, people enjoying the weather and checking out the bridge and the Spotter’s Guide and happy winter finally left. The giant crane was positioned near the Rockland shoreline, and people were taking pictures with their cell phones.

So when will the westbound span open? The summer before the project began, then state DOT Project Director Michael Anderson said traffic will switch to the new bridge sometime during the fourth year (2017).

Then we heard west/northbound traffic would move to the new span in December 2016, and two months later (February 2017) to move east/southbound traffic as well. Former Executive Director Robert L. Megna decided in early November to postpone the first opening until spring 2017.

Project officials are talking about “sometime this year.” I wonder if there are still built-in contract incentives for finishing the project before spring 2018 or penalties for completing it later? Is the bridge builder still on a 62-month schedule?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Educational Outreach explains the Pulley System

This cool interactive demonstration at Stemtastics in Larchmont showed kids and parents how pulleys work to lift weights like structural steel on bridges.

The I Lift NY super crane’s versabar (system) can lift up to 1700 metric tons (1928 US tons), much-needed strength when lifting pieces of structural steel.

* * * * *

It’s getting closer to when two-way traffic will shift to the the westbound span; however, I’m wondering how the belvederes will be constructed while cars are on that span. Will one lane be closed so crews can safely work on the shared use path? Will the belvederes be completed before traffic moves to the westbound span?

Here’s a view of the westbound span, where workers lower formwork over rebar. Getting there! Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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