Archive for the ‘New NY Bridge’ Tag

Five Dollars for the Next 16 Months, and Then?

“We don’t know how much we will we get from the federal government, how much we will get from the state; there are state loans and grants we can access,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said nearly four years ago.

He was fielding questions about tolls and the task force he proposed in 2012 to address them while in Piermont to greet the newly-arrived super crane.

“Additional unknowns are the built-in contract incentives for Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) to finish the project before spring 2018 or penalties for completing it later. Once you have those numbers, then you can come up with a plan about how to do it, what commuters should pay, on-hour, off-hour, etc.,” he said.

The governor assured the task force will be formed “I think within the next year, certainly,” and commuters “should have to pay as little as possible.” Rumors have been that tolls could run as high as $14 per vehicle, but state officials have downplayed that possibility.

When asked about fares on the new bridge during last week’s primary debate with Democratic gubernatorial challenger Cynthia Nixon, Cuomo reiterated Thruway tolls will remain the same until at least 2020; fees going forward would depend on the state’s finances at the time. No mention of the task force that, per the Journal News, has disappeared.

What happened to those additional unknowns Cuomo cited four years ago? What happened to potential commuter discount options and a resident discount program? By the way, it’s coming around to fall 2018. Does this mean penalties for TZC will be factored into the new bridge’s tolls?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

TBT: Three-Month Dredging Period Begins; Nautical Warnings Reiterated

From five years ago today. Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

Yesterday opened the three-month (to November 1) window for dredging in the Hudson River, and today began round-the-clock operations.

“Excavation is in the shallow water to the east and west side(s) of the Federal Navigation Channel,” the Local Notice to Mariners reported. “Various barges are anchored outside the Federal Navigation Channel upstream of the bridge. On scene are the dredges WEEKS 506 & 551, tugs and barges that are lit; all are monitoring VHF-FM channels 13 and 16.”

It continued, “Mariners are urged to use extreme caution and transit the area at their slowest safe speed to create minimum wake after passing arrangements have been made.”

This information is reiterated in the Boat Owners Association of the United States’ East Coast Alerts by Mel Neale (August 1, 2013).

The chosen design requires less environmental impact regarding pile driving, dredging and threats to fish; the NYS DEC Final Permit, issued March 25, 2013, and additional Coast Guard information, are posted at the New NY Bridge website, which issued a press release today re operations and safety.

“Equipment associated with the operation is arriving on site. Approximately one dozen barges and other specially designed dredging vessels will be part of the operation,” the release said. It referred to the Coast Guard’s revised Notice to Mariners that details updated safety information, “including a request that boaters use extreme caution within 1,000 feet of all construction barges as a safety precaution.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Holiday Weekend: Keep in Mind Boater Safety

There’s a silence to this photo taken from seven and one-half miles south of the bridges. One bridge nearly completed and one partially-dismantled bridge that was cause for celebration and dismay when it opened: another way to cross the Hudson River at irreparable cost to a village.

Recently, I heard stories about the Tappan Zee Bridge from someone who moved to the area as a child and who loved to swim in the river it crossed. It must have been fun way back then to swim in a clean river with keeping cool the only aims.

While the Hudson’s not for humans it is for boats (neat segue, right?) as Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start of summer. I’ve been on the Hudson numerous times, thanks to this project. Never been on a sailboat or a small craft. Hint, hint, maybe an invitation.

Remember, the project is still an active construction site. Earlier this month, the main span channel was closed when crews removed the center section of the old bridge.

Have fun, be safe, obey the rules and keep all required supplies, including first aid, aboard. Enjoy!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Logging Miles before the Bridge Path Opens

It was raining by the time I got home last night, the sixth shared use path boot camp mile behind me.

Yes, readers, I’m getting ready for when the path opens next year as I plan to walk across one of the Hudson River’s widest points. The distance will be more than 3.1 miles when you include the Westchester and Rockland landings.

I’ve walked for exercise during the past few years, even when my knee and hip began to groan. The new hip joint, six and one-half weeks old today, helped me walk six miles during the past three days (two miles in one-mile stints every other day). Goal is to work up to two miles at a time, then three miles at a time.

These are in addition to walking for errands, etc. We’re talking pre-SUP training.

While the above photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority is from last November, it’s nice to know the path will be well-lit for those who want to bicycle or walk during shorter days and/or dusk. Hours are to be determined.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

LHV Engineering Expo: 15th Annual STEM Event

As the bridge project met and hit timeline markers, your intrepid reporter met one of her own: last Sunday I attended the Lower Hudson Valley Engineering Expo at White Plains High School. Yes, my then four-and-one-half week new hip and I.

The first photo includes a black strand sticking up from the cross-section of stay cable. The photo above shows the top of that section with wires bundled into it.

Everyone wanted to see how heavy the section of 18-gauge galvanized rebar was compared to the residential rebar. I wonder if anyone tried to pick up the section of cement.

There were oyster shells — I put two up to my ear and thought I heard a whoosh although not like the ocean — and furry friends like this fish to show the project was protecting life below the bridge.

Weather not withstanding as spring is hiding somewhere, the day of companies, experiments, college and universities, learning and contests was a success. It was reigning STEM. You’re smiling if you understand the reference, and please pardon the pun if you don’t.

Watch for story about kids’ fascination with —  and how they’re learning about — STEM topics and activities in the May 2018 issue of Westchester Family.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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