Archive for the ‘Peregrine falcons’ Tag

Bridge Project photos on a snowy Pi (3.14) Day

March never ceases to amaze: we March(ed) forth days ago, and today’s a play on words, Pi Day. May the Ides of March weather be gentle. We’ll see.

Pretty scene last night with the fiery sunset as backdrop to the new bridge’s towers. Here’s the same view 18 hours later: looks a bit different, right?

By 9:30 a.m., one of the Peregrine falcons ventured out to see what’s doing, and by 11 am. (a snow lull), it was back inside and discussing its findings.

Photos 2, 3 and 4 courtesy of EarthCam® Construction Cameras.

Today I’m fact-checking and editing an article about the project for an upcoming deadline. When it’s published, I’ll post the link here. Happy Pi Day!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Peregrine Falcons’ Last Clutch in Current Home

Three months ago I looked across at the Tappan Zee Bridge and wondered if the falcon nest was over there on a beam. It moves to a new home this year.

This will be the last year the Peregrine falcon mama hatches her eyases — word has it she’s pregnant — in her current home/nest before moving day.

Looking fly (no pun intended): basking in the bright sunshine/Photo courtesy of EarthCam®

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Seeking and Finding the Peregrine Falcon Nest

Looks like a falcon was home when we drove by yesterday/Photo courtesy of EarthCam®

Looks like a falcon was home when we drove by yesterday/Photo courtesy of EarthCam®

Yesterday’s attempt to see it did not disappoint. You can miss the toll gantry on the southbound Thruway ramp from South Nyack if you’re not looking; however, I got a chance to glimpse the Peregrine falcon nest.

Tucked into a right angle of one of the beams it looked small and cute from the road and was partially visible as we drove to Nyack. Westbound traffic allowed me to look up while driving, and lots of space between the cars in front of and behind mine let me look up quickly as we drove back to Westchester.

Maybe Irvwing, who arrived near the end of April, was out exploring. I’m sure one of his parents was photographed by my friend last week.

main span road deck

Adjacent to the bridge, far below the nest, workers are installing precast road deck panels on top of blue girders (structural steel). Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

Peregrine Falcon in Flight and a Friend’s Story

The falcons’ new residence being built in background/ EarthCam® construction camera

The falcons’ new residence being built in background/ EarthCam® construction camera

When I last checked the falcon cam there was a newly hatched bird that became known as Irvwing. The nest that sits cozily on the bridge will be moved to the new bridge once it’s completed — after one of the community meetings two weeks ago a member of the project team pointed out its location — and the resident falcons will have a new home in the same place.

Is this like moving to the house next door?

Six months after crews start building their new home/ EarthCam® construction camera

Five months after crews start building their new home/ EarthCam® construction camera

While I’ve never seen a Peregrine falcon up close or flying in the sky or resting on a wire one of my friends has . . . and he wrote about the experience of seeing her and included pictures. Pretty cool!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

Meet Irvwing, Winning Name in Falcon Contest

falcon name winner

You were in suspense like I was, right? One recently-hatched chick (eyase), a naming contest, results are in . . . and we were told to wait. What fun is that?

cake

It wasn’t a long wait, though, because days later we learned Irvwing the baby chick can thank Washington Irving Intermediate School 5th graders for its name.

WI school class

The chick will most likely be banded as were its siblings, and when fully grown can fly at up to 200 mph. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

Congratulations to the two-time winners!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

%d bloggers like this: