Archive for the ‘pile caps’ Tag

Fewer Expansion Joints ensure a Smoother Ride

These are the expansion joints — one of 12 such joints on the westbound span that absorb the bridge’s steel and concrete slight expansions and contractions — I photographed that freezing December day, when media got its first look at the westbound span, and when the main span towers were completed.

Same for the eastbound span in the above photo, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority. So while crews are pouring concrete between the deck panels on some parts of the span, they’re installing joints in other areas of it.

Deck panel installation for that span and its 11 joints was completed earlier this month. South of the new span (below), Tappan Zee Bridge pile caps and piles await removal. Photos are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

It nearly 200 expansion joints made for noisy and bumpy rides, sometimes in sync to songs on the radio.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

ICYMI: Scenes from around the Project Site

Wires? A huge bug? Nope. Per project officials, these are tubes that cooled the new bridge’s concrete pile caps via concrete cytalitic reaction. Too complex for me, suffice to say they helped make the new bridge stronger.

Photos 1, 3 and 4 are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

This colorful new view from steps near the clubhouse at Quay condominiums in Tarrytown differs from what residents living there saw when the project started.

Looking north from the Westchester landing, you can see piers from the Tappan Zee Bridge and the two new spans. The project slowed during the past few weeks due to bitterly cold temps that caused a frozen river.

Sweet photo. An astute eye snapped hungry mallard ducks befriending some of the crew. Before long, the Peregrine falcons will return to their home — on which bridge?

Rain, rain, go away. Come again another day. See this pipe affixed to the blue structural steel girders near the Westchester landing? It helps prevent flooding and is part of the new bridge’s drainage system.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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