Archive for the ‘road deck’ Tag

Fewer Expansion Joints ensure a Smoother Ride

These are the expansion joints — one of 12 such joints on the westbound span that absorb the bridge’s steel and concrete slight expansions and contractions — I photographed that freezing December day, when media got its first look at the westbound span, and when the main span towers were completed.

Same for the eastbound span in the above photo, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority. So while crews are pouring concrete between the deck panels on some parts of the span, they’re installing joints in other areas of it.

Deck panel installation for that span and its 11 joints was completed earlier this month. South of the new span (below), Tappan Zee Bridge pile caps and piles await removal. Photos are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

It nearly 200 expansion joints made for noisy and bumpy rides, sometimes in sync to songs on the radio.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

LHV Engineering Expo: 15th Annual STEM Event

As the bridge project met and hit timeline markers, your intrepid reporter met one of her own: last Sunday I attended the Lower Hudson Valley Engineering Expo at White Plains High School. Yes, my then four-and-one-half week new hip and I.

The first photo includes a black strand sticking up from the cross-section of stay cable. The photo above shows the top of that section with wires bundled into it.

Everyone wanted to see how heavy the section of 18-gauge galvanized rebar was compared to the residential rebar. I wonder if anyone tried to pick up the section of cement.

There were oyster shells — I put two up to my ear and thought I heard a whoosh although not like the ocean — and furry friends like this fish to show the project was protecting life below the bridge.

Weather not withstanding as spring is hiding somewhere, the day of companies, experiments, college and universities, learning and contests was a success. It was reigning STEM. You’re smiling if you understand the reference, and please pardon the pun if you don’t.

Watch for story about kids’ fascination with —  and how they’re learning about — STEM topics and activities in the May 2018 issue of Westchester Family.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

ICYMI: Cool Views from around the Project Site

These sections of structural steel slated are the foundation for eastbound span deck panels that will have a one-inch polymer overlay for the driving surface and lane markings. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

Did you miss this from the car? The new maintenance facility is coming along.

What you don’t see from the driver’s seat: the police barracks foundation is progressing on the southern side of the Thruway.

I thought this would become a new pier near the Rockland shoreline. Wrong. It’s the Rockland abutment for the eastbound span.

Mystery object with snow-covered land in the background. Can you tell what it is?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Bridge Progress and Four Years in Two Minutes

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Taking a look back two years ago when the main span towers were beginning. Here are the past four years in two minutes courtesy of the project team.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Engineering Expo and Recognizing Rebar

Today was a perfect chance to learn about the bridge project, what with plenty of experts at the Engineering Expo ready to answer questions. I bet you were there trying to stump one of them.

Not possible. You’d have learned, however, the main span towers are 1,200 feet apart at each end of the channel, and their platforms are 14 feet thick and more than 360 feet long. It took a lot of concrete — 11,000 cubic yards, to be exact — to fill them. And you’d have learned lots more.

While there I visited several exhibitors and, among other things, learned how sewers are relined using a sophisticated method. What caught my eye was an object on the table that was the same size and shape as something I’ve seen before.

I asked the woman if it was rebar; she said yes, it was, and seemed surprised I recognized it. Between you and me, I wouldn’t know a rebar sample from a hole in the wall had it not been for the educational outreach presentations.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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