Archive for the ‘Rockland County’ Tag

Where the Bridge meets Water, Land and Itself

Above is one of the two 14-foot-thick foundations that each support four of the eight main span towers. Each foundation is 360 feet long and 60 feet wide and is filled with 11,000 cubic yards of concrete.

“Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet.” Really?

This is kinda bridge-related since it intrigued us in a @NewNYBridge tweet.

Remember when we were stumped by what looked like a football helmet with stubs (looked like to me) sticking out of the sides (below)? Here’s where you can find this intriguing piece of art and much more.

You thought I forgot to write about current bridge news, right? To read what’s doing, check herePhoto courtesy New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

ICYMI: Rockland SUP plans may face legal snag

Snowy Eesposito Trail/Credit Jess Hans Smolin

When one door closes, the saying goes, another one opens. What happens if the closing door — all but shut — is suddenly stopped by a situation that metaphorically says, “Not so fast!”

With the bridge project progressing steadily, and final designs for the walking/bicycle path due in June, it seems unlikely anything would intercept construction plans — until now.

The group Preserve South Nyack contests plans to intersect the Esposito Trail with the new bridge’s walking/bicycle path and whether or not the Thruway Authority followed legal protocol to acquire 0.81 acres next to the trail for a bicycle path.

PSN identified multiple deficiencies in the agency’s eminent domain proceedings, which include neglecting to serve the village (as condemnee) proper notice. The condemning authority (Thruway Authority) has to conduct a public hearing to determine if the greater public purpose being served by eminent domain.

Notice is to be published five times prior to a meeting and one or two times after the meeting within 90 days of its occurrence.

Drawing/Credit Reese Leader, 6, regular trail user and visitor

Members maintain the agency neglected to notify residents with the appropriate number of public notices prior to the March 2016 meeting — and neglected to notify the village either in person or by certified mail — per Eminent Domain Procedure Law (EDPL) Section 202, which governs the notice for the hearing and requirements to be met.

An inadvertent failure to meet the requirements of Section 202 is not jurisdictional. Further, the agency neglected to follow protocol re EDPL Section 204(C)3, which mandates it notify the village of findings and determination after a public hearing — March 2016 — in person or by certified mail.

PSN’s position is the 30 day Statue of Limitations doesn’t start until after the notice is delivered by certified mail or in person.

To date the Thruway Authority has not provided proof of compliance with EDPL Section 204. If this defect is deemed jurisdictional in court, then South Nyack can challenge the ruling. If not, then the village cannot challenge it. This specific issue has no court precedent.

That the Thruway Authority published 91 days after the meeting may hold less material or jurisdictional importance as its failure to notify the village of a proposed condemnation via personal delivery or certified mail.

Esposito Trail/Credit Kristy Leader

Months earlier, Village Trustee Andrew Goodwillie proposed a plan that would end that shared use path (SUP) at the Exit 10 on-ramp at South Broadway, which will close as part of the Concept F plans.

Proponents maintain this viable alternative will keep bicyclists off South Franklin Street, which is narrower than South Broadway, leaving the Esposito Trail intact for residents.

The Thruway Authority would save money as it would neither need to build a trailhead at Clinton Avenue and South Franklin Street nor make improvements alongside the trail, and no easement would be needed from the village.

PSN feels moving the SUP entrance would also negate the need to build a ramp to the trail and would afford police security from nearby Village Hall.

Dennis E.A. Lynch, representing South Nyack, explained if the village owns the property (Esposito Trail), then its officials can pass legislation to make it parkland. It can also be deemed parkland via deed or use.

South Nyack is awaiting results of a title research/confirmation that it owns the property (0.81 acres of Esposito Trail) and a legal opinion as to its rights and responsibilities to then determine what it can do regarding the Thruway Authority’s actions. When and if the deficiency is corrected, then the village will take appropriate action in the best interest of its residents.

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times March 9, 2017.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

TBT: Looking Back at Earlier Project Photos

What are those things floating in the river? Debris? No, those are piles, and the story that day (June 2014 media tour) was pile cleansing: scooping out the muck prior to filling them with concrete and rebar (reinforced steel).

Did you notice the super crane is on the south side of the bridge? It had recently arrived at the project site, where crews waited for low tide a few days later before limbo-ing it under the current bridge.

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Oh my, how tiny it looks at ground level. This is from early September 2015, when crews began building those now-419-foot tall towers using self-climbing jump forms. Are those cartoon heads in the red truck?

Here’s a memory from days gone by, when tolls were 50 cents each way. One-way collection was adopted August 12, 1970, and toll booths on the northbound lanes were removed.

And guess what? We made it through the Ides of March. Ha!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Counting down to the westbound span opening

new-and-old

Early yesterday I had part of the bridge — from the Westchester approach until the start of the main span — to myself. NO cars, trucks, vans, nothing. So I slowed a little bit (making sure no one was behind me) and snapped.

If the bridge could talk, then here’s what it would say:

Yesterday I felt tired and a little sad. I mean, wouldn’t you? Imagine watching them train your replacement at work because they’re letting you go: I’m only here until they finish the first span.

There are others my age and older who are around longer than I — the Bear Mountain Bridge (1924), the Mid-Hudson Bridge (1930) and the Rip Van Winkle Bridge (1935) come to mind — yet they’re replacing me.

True, I’m a three-miler; however, think about it. Was this the best place to build me? Some think not — the topic lends itself to controversy — yet here they chose.

main-span

The new bridge next to me is much taller than I am, which doesn’t diminish me. I have history here and stories to tell, and I bet you didn’t know I’ve kept secrets, too. Even with four lanes in each direction it’ll be a not-so-nice surprise when people realize there will still be three highway lanes leading to and from in Rockland. We’ll see how they plan for traffic in Westchester.

It also means positive changes to both counties, especially to South Nyack, and parts of me will be used for other construction projects.

When you drive across my span I know you’re staring at the new bridge. I don’t blame you; I watch its progress every day. Even though they’ll take me apart this year I know your memories of me will stay long after I’m gone.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Throwback Thursday: Four Years Earlier . . .

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© Janie Rosman 2013

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© Janie Rosman 2013

Tomorrow’s presidential inauguration has been the focus of media coverage and attention nationwide and around the world: a new leader will be sworn into office, a testament to our democracy.

Today for Throwback Thursday I’m noting the anniversary of another event: four years ago yesterday NYS Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli approved the contract with Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) to replace the Tappan Zee Bridge. At the time it was called the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project.

Crews began pre-construction work two months later.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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