Archive for the ‘Rockland County’ Tag

TBT: Looking Back at Earlier Project Photos

What are those things floating in the river? Debris? No, those are piles, and the story that day (June 2014 media tour) was pile cleansing: scooping out the muck prior to filling them with concrete and rebar (reinforced steel).

Did you notice the super crane is on the south side of the bridge? It had recently arrived at the project site, where crews waited for low tide a few days later before limbo-ing it under the current bridge.

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Oh my, how tiny it looks at ground level. This is from early September 2015, when crews began building those now-419-foot tall towers using self-climbing jump forms. Are those cartoon heads in the red truck?

Here’s a memory from days gone by, when tolls were 50 cents each way. One-way collection was adopted August 12, 1970, and toll booths on the northbound lanes were removed.

And guess what? We made it through the Ides of March. Ha!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Counting down to the westbound span opening

new-and-old

Early yesterday I had part of the bridge — from the Westchester approach until the start of the main span — to myself. NO cars, trucks, vans, nothing. So I slowed a little bit (making sure no one was behind me) and snapped.

If the bridge could talk, then here’s what it would say:

Yesterday I felt tired and a little sad. I mean, wouldn’t you? Imagine watching them train your replacement at work because they’re letting you go: I’m only here until they finish the first span.

There are others my age and older who are around longer than I — the Bear Mountain Bridge (1924), the Mid-Hudson Bridge (1930) and the Rip Van Winkle Bridge (1935) come to mind — yet they’re replacing me.

True, I’m a three-miler; however, think about it. Was this the best place to build me? Some think not — the topic lends itself to controversy — yet here they chose.

main-span

The new bridge next to me is much taller than I am, which doesn’t diminish me. I have history here and stories to tell, and I bet you didn’t know I’ve kept secrets, too. Even with four lanes in each direction it’ll be a not-so-nice surprise when people realize there will still be three highway lanes leading to and from in Rockland. We’ll see how they plan for traffic in Westchester.

It also means positive changes to both counties, especially to South Nyack, and parts of me will be used for other construction projects.

When you drive across my span I know you’re staring at the new bridge. I don’t blame you; I watch its progress every day. Even though they’ll take me apart this year I know your memories of me will stay long after I’m gone.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Throwback Thursday: Four Years Earlier . . .

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© Janie Rosman 2013

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© Janie Rosman 2013

Tomorrow’s presidential inauguration has been the focus of media coverage and attention nationwide and around the world: a new leader will be sworn into office, a testament to our democracy.

Today for Throwback Thursday I’m noting the anniversary of another event: four years ago yesterday NYS Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli approved the contract with Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) to replace the Tappan Zee Bridge. At the time it was called the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project.

Crews began pre-construction work two months later.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Now and Then and a Changing Hudson Valley

kids-at-viewing-area

This year the first span opens, and the Hudson Valley will again change. I love this photo of the kids looking at the construction and see it symbolizing the future, their future, as the figure below imagined his future years before.

Craig Long, historian for the Villages of Suffern and Montebello and the Town of Ramapo, discussed previous ideas for a Hudson River crossing last summer.

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

I focused on his narrative about Nanuet Assemblyman Fred Horn, the “Father of the Bridge,” who rallied for one-quarter century for such a project.

Long said a bridge (railroad) was proposed from Piermont to Hastings as early 1905 with calls continuing for the next 20 or so years. It gained traction, he said, when Horn took office, proposing a bill in 1930 for a bridge from Piermont to Hastings with Hook Mountain and Rockland Lake as other locations.

During the next two years Horn proposed a bridge, then a bridge/tunnel from Snedens Landing to Dobb’s Ferry.

Here’s where the sparks begin to fly.

thenGood idea except the proposed site was within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s 25-mile jurisdiction, and it would need to approve, and then, operate the project. The proposals failed as did Horn when he ran for re-election.

“In 1935, the Rockland Causeway-Tunnel Authority was created with a drive to bridge the Hudson from Nyack to Tarrytown,” Long said in an email. “As studies begin, no determination is made as to whether Upper Nyack, Nyack, or South Nyack will be the bridge’s terminus. In August of that year, it is central Nyack; by October it is South Nyack, Voorhis Point.

tzb-signThe following March (1936) Grand View was chosen as a potential landing site; by August the War Department approved it and Tarrytown on the Westchester side. While Hook Mountain again a choice the northern location didn’t sit well with Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader, who gained support for nixing the idea, or with residents.

Long wrote, “In October of that year, the Journal News took a straw poll on the idea of a Hudson River crossing and where it should be located” with an unscientific tally of 792 in favor and 405 opposed. Grand View was the favored location 391 votes (not residents). Results from boring led the state to abandon the project one month later. Last fall marked 80 years since that straw poll.

Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Renderings for Walking/Bicycle Path Terminus

rendering

This morning the store was empty. Its parking lot offered numerous spaces from which to choose, and there was no line waiting to pay for items.

“You should have been here yesterday,” the cashier said as she rang up my purchase. “The lines were around the store, and people were complaining that they had no place to park.”

Yesterday I had no interest in crowded places and worked on an article that will post next week. My neighborhood was quiet, the roads were as empty as the store I went to this morning, and it felt like everything stopped.

The previous weeks were busy, and I missed the meeting in South Nyack during which the village and the Thruway Authority presented renderings for the shared use path terminus in Rockland that will open in 2018.

Good news continues for the village. To recap:

In spring 2015 the state agreed to relocate the Rockland terminus (landing point) away from residential village streets to Thruway property near Exit 10 with adjacent parking.

The above rendering, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority, is one of four presented during the November 15 meeting.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

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