Archive for the ‘safety’ Tag

Greenburgh Town Supervisor reiterates a Bike Path is needed on Route 119 for Safety Reasons

Eastbound on Route 119 in White Plains. L is Bronx River Pkwy; R is Central Avenue

On April 1st the NYS Legislature will approve a budget. One goal: fund a bike path on Route 119 from the South County/North County trail to the bridge. This would enable cyclists to bike from Westchester & Putnam to the bridge safely. Avoid fatalities.

Within a few months the new bike path on the Mario Cuomo bridge will open to thousands of cyclists. The bike path is definitely going to become a major destination location for cyclists from around the world  (similar to the Walkway over the Hudson in Poughkeepsie that attracted 615,000 people in 2019).

I’m a cyclist and am very excited about the bike path that will open. But, am very nervous about the safety of cyclists getting to and from the bridge. 119  has significant traffic. There have been bicycle fatalities on the bridge . In 2009 Greenburgh resident and community activist Merrill Cassell was sideswiped by a Bee line bus in Greenburgh on 119. Last year Westchester settled a case with the widow and paid Mrs. Cassell $75,000.

In recent years Dan Convissor, head of Bike Tarrytown and others have been pushing for a bike path or lane on Route 119. I enthusiastically support this initiative. Greenburgh had received a grant from the state of NY in 2017 for $250,000 as part of the new NY bridge project to redesign Route 119 to make it safer for pedestrians and cyclists.   Now, it’s time for State Legislators to fund the bike safety initiative . It would be sad if cyclists lose their life biking to a safe bicycle friendly bridge because the road leading to the bridge was not safe.  The state budget will be approved on April 1. Reach out to the Governor and your State Legislators and tell them this is important.

If NYS would fund a bike path/lane from the South County/North County trail to the bridge it will enable cyclists to safely get to and from the bridge from the Bronx/Westchester border and from Putnam County –without cycling on dangerous streets.

A safe bicycle friendly Route 119 would also help some of the area hotels on Route 119 attract guests interested in cycling.

Reposted from the Town of Greenburgh’s website.

Greenburgh Town Supervisor says a Bike Path is needed on Route 119 for Safety Reasons

Socks, sneakers and wheels indicate a sign of the path to come/NYS Thruway Authority

“We need to encourage the members of the NYS Legislature to fund a bike path on Route 119 (a NYS road) so cyclists will be able to safely get to the Mario Cuomo Bridge bike path when it opens soon. Route 119 is very busy and dangerous for cyclists,” Greenburgh Town Supervisor Paul Feiner wrote in a post on the village’s website here.

“In less than two months the NYS Legislature will approve the budget. It’s my hope that funding will be included for a bike path on Route 119 from the North and South County trails to the Mario Cuomo Bridge.

A bicycle lane will be opening on the new bridge within months. Unfortunately, it’s not very safe for cyclists to use unless they are experienced riders. Route 119 is a very busy road (with) lots of traffic. We’ve had bicycle accidents on Route 119 in the past, including a fatal accident closer to the County Center (there is a ghost bicycle at the scene of the accident to remind cyclists and motorists of the dangers).

Bicycle enthusiasts are very excited about the new bike path on the bridge. We would be more excited if there would be a safe way to get to and from the bridge. A bike path on Route 119 from the South and North County trails would enable cyclists to bike from the Bronx and Putnam County lines (South and North County trails) to Rockland safely.

This proposed bike lane is located in Greenburgh. However, it will be used by tourists and cyclists from all over the world since the bike path is expected to become a destination location, which is another reason why this bike path is so needed.”

Reposted from the Town of Greenburgh’s website.

TBT: Controlled Demolition of East Anchor Span

Crowds gathered to watch this time last year. Here it is in real time and in slow motion courtesy of Kevin P. Coughlin/State of New York. The section looks like it’s floating on the water; however, the perfect fall caused its columns to drop to the river bottom.

Demolition experts placed charges on vertical support structures along the span of the bridge. The charges were timed to detonate in a way that would safely lower the remaining structure eastward, away from the Hudson River’s main navigation channel, according to a fact sheet released by the construction project.

Fitting it happened this month: January 2013 was when the Thruway Authority issued Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) Notice To Proceed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Last Piece of Tappan Zee floats in Hudson River

You can see the west anchor span floating atop barges in the river south of the new bridge and not far from its former location. The New York State Thruway Authority photo above is from last week; the former anchor now points south and not east.

It’s odd not to see a portion of the old bridge to the south of the new one; I was surprised to see the span still close by. Here’s a final look at the span next to the new bridge:

Today’s trip to Nyack and Nanuet was bookmarked by vehicles speeding across the westbound and eastbound spans at more than 65 miles per hour. There seem to be no way to enforce the speed limit unless police install those devices that measure speeds. It’s one way for the state to make money instead of increasing the tolls.

Something to think about. I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

TZB West Anchor Span Removal and Dismantling

Governor Cuomo was at the project site yesterday to document final removal of the Tappan Zee Bridge, whose east anchor span fell after a controlled demolition early this year. Now in the Hudson River, it will be lifted and removed.

Top of east anchor span that will be lifted, removed from river bottom/© Press Office

While the old bridge became property of the design-build team, the state had an interest in how and when it was removed from the river. Last spring, the main span was lowered onto a bard and removed, and pieces of that span became part of the artificial reefs being built off Long Island.

Remaining west anchor span will be lowered into barges and removed./© Press Office

The remaining west anchor span, attached by four columns, was cut and is being lowered onto barges, then moved south and dismantled.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

%d bloggers like this: