Archive for the ‘shared use path’ Tag

South Nyack continues La Resistance: Parking

Determined to prevent an anticipated barrage of non-resident cars on village streets when the new bridge’s walking and bicycle path opens, South Nyack officials presented several solutions, including help from a smart phone.

“This is a long way from happening and it’s not in cement,” Mayor Bonnie Christian told the packed firehouse meeting room Tuesday night.

She was referring to a parking app that electronically monitors where nonresidents park and for how long, and integrates with police license plate readers to see if a parked car belongs to a resident or to a visitor and if the occupied spot is paid for or not.

What began as a casual study to see who was parking on village streets and why became a race to protect South Nyack from the state’s largest design-build infrastructure project. “The residents are concerned about parking issues arising from the new bridge and shared use path, and the parking committee researched several programs, including Parkmobile,” Christian said.

Three years earlier (fall 2014), the newly-formed parking committee—Trustee Nancy Willen, Police Chief Brent Newbury, Kendol Leader and Bruce Forrester—began noting drivers park in South Nyack and go to other destinations. Specifically, the number of vehicles (230 per day) parked increased during street fairs and other events in Nyack.

On more than one occasion, Leader and Forrester counted on foot “easy 1,500 cars parked in South Nyack for the Nyack street fair, and sometimes up to 2,100 cars,” Willen said. Factor in the Thruway Authority’s 2014 parking demand study for the new path that concluded 59 percent of the 473 peak-hour visitors (within a 15-mile radius in Westchester and Rockland) will arrive by car.

South Nyack is also bracing for the Lower Hudson Transit Link—that will stop within Interchange 10 (South Franklin Extension) in South Nyack and at Artopee Way in Nyack—that will replace Tappan ZEExpress next November. The committee anticipates the buses’ new features like signal priorities and ramp metering will attract riders.

“We don’t know how many people are going to take the bus,” Willen said. Factor in visitors to Pavion Nyack apartments, which allow a certain number of spots per unit. “How are we going to handle all of these cars?”

Because the village didn’t want meters or kiosks, “we (parking committee) looked into different companies. We researched all the different towns and villages in this area and we found many municipalities use parking apps,” Willen said. “You use your cell phone and call in for a parking space and pay for it remotely.”

Non-residents and occasional visitors, and those without the app, can call a toll-free number and pay via credit card. Metro North Railroad stations including Irvington (Westchester County) and Nanuet implement the pay-by-phone system; up to five cars can be attached to one account.

Other village parking options included two-hour limitation and resident permits via radio frequency identification (RFID) like the E-ZPass system, where a reader recognizes the tag on a car and communicates with an electronic toll reader at booths or the new bridge’s overhead gantries.

The cost of updating the Parkmobile (or other vendor’s) app daily with vehicle information would be offset by non-resident parking fees grossed by the village.

Based upon loose calculations, when such a program is implemented, South Nyack could annually gross between $450,000 and $665,000 revenue for daily parking during an eight-hour business day. For special events parking like the Nyack Street Fair, depending upon per-hour charges, the village could annually gross between $100,000 and $265,000.

“The meeting and residents’ responses were positive,” Christian said. Moving forward, the board will discuss the parking app option and hasn’t determined which company will provide the service if/when the idea is approved.

Note: While shared path users can park for free in the 54-spot lot on Thruway Authority property, there will be a time limit for use. South Nyack’s decision does not affect this area.

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times October 26, 2017.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Driving on all Four Lanes of the New Bridge

Yesterday I went to South Nyack and checked out the new bridge’s two outer lanes, which will become the shared use path (far right lane) and breakdown lane (second from right).

Not a bad ride, even with the gratings and the concrete strip that indicates where the shared use path divider will be built. And yes, the two left lanes were a bit smoother than the two right lanes.

When eastbound traffic moves to the new span, its two left lanes will also be a smoother ride than its two outer lanes. This arrangement is temporary until the eastbound span opens in 2018.

For the next few months, motorists have four westbound lanes on the new bridge and four eastbound lanes on the old bridge, the latter with that familiar thumpity-thump sound. Those empty lanes are being used as a construction area.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

ICMYI: Link to Opening Ceremony for New Span

Here is one of the stories you’ve been waiting for with photos from last week’s opening ceremony. The above traffic pattern remains in effect until eastbound traffic moves to the new span within a few months.

What you can’t see (and I won’t show) are blisters I got from walking around in socks and steel-toed shoes for four hours. Would I do it again? YES!

More details and photos of the new span in this week’s Rockland County Times.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

South Nyack Residents concerned about Path

It’s a little past the date for when the first span was to open. A little past. No one’s been counting months? Time marches on, they say. No one is more aware of this than residents of South Nyack — specifically, the group Preserve South Nyack — because the picture above will become the picture below (rendering by landscape architect Kathryn Wolf).

Check out the full story in the July 13, 2017, issue of the Rockland County Times.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

The Next Morning and Different Tree Shadows

This morning I returned to see what the path looks like at a different time of day. It was between 11:30 a.m. and noon when I took this photo, closing my eyes and pointing the camera at the sun.

Several weeks after writing about the group Preserve South Nyack’s efforts to preserve the trail I fell sideways off a friend’s front steps. It was early March. I didn’t feel pain or effects immediately, and then one day I was unable to get up from a chair without support from its arms, get into or out of the car, sit or drive comfortably or walk without limping. Yikes! This was a level of fear I’d never known.

Long story short, I’ve been meaning and wanting to walk on the Esposito Trail now that it’s warm, and the trees and plants have blossomed. Physical therapy helped a little; time and cortisone shots, more. My gait is sometimes off, like today, yet not enough to keep me from coming back to see the trail when the sun’s angle casts shadows from the east.

This time I saw bicyclists and a jogger, who waved hello. I also saw a man without a plastic bag enter the trail and walk his dog. There are bags (at least there were yesterday) available at the entrance from Clinton Avenue, and if there none left, then as a dog owner he knows to carry a bag.

A journalist, objectivity is key unless I’m writing an editorial or an opinion piece or sharing my thoughts here. As I did yesterday I looked to the west side of the trail, where the state plans to build a path separated by a granite median. In the above photo, you can see the roadway looks close by. I wonder how much of the trail’s width will be sacrificed for that median.

You guessed it: I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

%d bloggers like this: