Archive for the ‘shared use path’ Tag

South Nyack Residents concerned about Path

It’s a little past the date for when the first span was to open. A little past. No one’s been counting months? Time marches on, they say. No one is more aware of this than residents of South Nyack — specifically, the group Preserve South Nyack — because the picture above will become the picture below (rendering by landscape architect Kathryn Wolf).

Check out the full story in the July 13, 2017, issue of the Rockland County Times.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

The Next Morning and Different Tree Shadows

This morning I returned to see what the path looks like at a different time of day. It was between 11:30 a.m. and noon when I took this photo, closing my eyes and pointing the camera at the sun.

Several weeks after writing about the group Preserve South Nyack’s efforts to preserve the trail I fell sideways off a friend’s front steps. It was early March. I didn’t feel pain or effects immediately, and then one day I was unable to get up from a chair without support from its arms, get into or out of the car, sit or drive comfortably or walk without limping. Yikes! This was a level of fear I’d never known.

Long story short, I’ve been meaning and wanting to walk on the Esposito Trail now that it’s warm, and the trees and plants have blossomed. Physical therapy helped a little; time and cortisone shots, more. My gait is sometimes off, like today, yet not enough to keep me from coming back to see the trail when the sun’s angle casts shadows from the east.

This time I saw bicyclists and a jogger, who waved hello. I also saw a man without a plastic bag enter the trail and walk his dog. There are bags (at least there were yesterday) available at the entrance from Clinton Avenue, and if there none left, then as a dog owner he knows to carry a bag.

A journalist, objectivity is key unless I’m writing an editorial or an opinion piece or sharing my thoughts here. As I did yesterday I looked to the west side of the trail, where the state plans to build a path separated by a granite median. In the above photo, you can see the roadway looks close by. I wonder how much of the trail’s width will be sacrificed for that median.

You guessed it: I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Walking the Esposito Trail with My Thoughts

People were driving sooo slooowly this afternoon. Traffic began right after cars merged from Exit 9 onto the Thruway. The speed (constant braking) allowed me to see how far work on the new maintenance facility has progressed.

The Esposito Trail was pretty and lined with lush greenery. I took notice of the side where the new path will be built and kept thinking it will be gone by this time next year.

There were bicyclists and no other walkers in the late afternoon, and when they rode by I stepped aside. It was quiet and respectful, and I understand why some in the village want to keep it that way: no side path.

Beyond the green (west) I saw fencing and the outline of cars that completed the huge circle and chose to bear right into South Nyack. That’s if you look for the fencing. Hard to imagine what it will be like walking the trail, which will remain cinder, once the new path is built.

The state’s survey closes July 9; the village has been responding and has been making itself heard to the board and via lawn signs posted since January.

There’s still time to complete it and tell project officials what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Walk/bike path: NNYB is asking what you think

Distance between the top of the river and the main span is 138 feet/©Janie Rosman 2017

At least something about the new bridge will be the same as the current one!

You know the westbound span will have a walking/bicycle path. Love it? Hate it? Think it was poorly planned? A way to enjoy the Hudson Valley? Wish it had more shade? (I do, I do.) Project officials want your thoughts via a Survey Monkey poll.

“The New NY Bridge project team is seeking your input to better understand how the community will utilize the new Shared Use Path (SUP) to be built on the westbound span following completion of the eastbound span in 2018. Features of the bicycle and pedestrian path will include six overlooks—or resting points—above the Hudson River; visitor parking and pavilions; and interpretive exhibits, art, and signage.”

Here’s your chance to tell all! They’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

South Nyack and Thruway Authority agree to collaborate on residents’ behalf

The quaint village resolved to hold the Thruway Authority to its word about working together to minimize the new TZ Bridge project’s impact on residents.

At the onset of their Tuesday village board meeting, trustees convened in executive session with special counsel Dennis E.A. Lynch to discuss the agency’s EDPL non-compliance and lack of efforts to demonstrate compliance. During a brief meeting Friday morning (May 12), trustees unanimously adopted a resolution to resolve issues discussed during that session.

The Rockland County Times reported on March 9, 2017, that neighborhood group Preserve South Nyack (PSN) identified multiple deficiencies in the agency’s EDPL proceedings.

In a resolution dated March 22, 2017, trustees said the Thruway Authority “must demonstrate full compliance with all notice and other provisions of the EDPL . . . “noting the village’s rights under appropriate EDPL provisions. It also said the village notified the agency of its concerns “and needs a more definitive, concrete and direct response and prompt resolution of those concerns . . . “

State representatives met with Christian and village officials on May 4 to discuss concerns and to suggest appropriate ways of moving forward, addressing all impacts and definitively satisfying village concerns and impacts expressed that were not previously discusses or resolved.

In a letter to Christian dated May 8, 2017, Thruway Authority Acting Executive Director Bill Finch confirmed the May 4 meeting and indicated a desire “to help preserve the character of your village and to mitigate the impacts associated with the construction of the new NY Bridge Project.”

Citing the state’s willingness to relocate the path’s terminus in 2015 as “perhaps the most indicative of our enduring commitment to the Village,” Finch said the Thruway Authority reaffirm(s) its commitment to support South Nyack’s goal of achieving fiscal sustainability helping it apply for non-bridge-related grants.

He continued, “In addition to the Community Benefits Program (CBP) study of Interchange 10 mentioned above, the Authority stands ready to work with the Village in its acquisition and redevelopment of surplus property at Interchange 10 once any future reconfiguration of the Interchange is complete.”

If South Nyack determines the agency does not keep its word re the mitigations and its “acquisition and reedevelopment of surplus property at Interchange 10 once any future reconfiguration of the Interchange is complete,” then village officials will consider appropriate action.

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times May 18, 2017.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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