Archive for the ‘shared use path’ Tag

My Thoughts: Cyclists go S-L-O-W-L-Y on SUP

The above photo is courtesy of Walkway Over the Hudson Historic State Park. You can see there is plenty of room for walking and bicycling, even side-by-side bicycling. Now check out far right lane of the new bridge’s westbound span below.

To the right of the broken line is where the shared use path will be built. Do they look the same? No. Are they the same width? No. Do you think a cyclist or a group of cyclists can safely rush to meet a train in Tarrytown or to get home after work if people are walking leisurely? You decide.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Accompanied by Springsteen & Heading Home

Walking’s a lot easier, and my shoe is less snug. Means my foot is not as swollen with help from compression hose. Ugh. Putting the hose on my surgical leg is easier with the sock helper; removing it is another story. Still, I persist and so far have walked 14 miles in two weeks.

Shared use path, I’m getting ready for you! The above photo was taken last year en route to the opening ceremony for the westbound span.

And as the path takes shape, and the eastbound span nears completion, there remains the Tappan Zee Bridge. Cuts in the truss can only mean one thing, so I’m going to wax nostalgic and go back in time. For everyone who considers Rockland County “upstate,” this is for you:

October 1975. “Born to Run” is blasting on the bus radio, as we Westchesterites and Long Islanders fly through Rockland County. The SUCO bus left Oneonta at 4 p.m., and we’re due to arrive at the County Center at 8:30 p.m.

Then we see it, the Tappan Zee Bridge. While I’m glad to be back for the weekend — and looking forward to catching up with friends I’ve not seen in two months — I’m unprepared for the little shiver that runs through me.

I chose the upstate New York college for its nutrition program, then wondered what made me think chemistry would be easier than in high school? The following year I transferred to community college, switched majors, and worked part-time.

The bridge was nearly 20, the average age on that bus; Bruce, not much older.

It was a chartered bus, where you step up into seats on either side of the aisle; above them, compartments hold luggage and coats. In those seats, some teenagers are dozing, some are watching the bridge — illuminated against the dark sky — move closer, others are belting out, “Tramps like us baby we were born to run!”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Soon to be Gone: TZB Main Span Removal Ahead

You can see the future in these photos; the two below are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority. It’s getting close to that time, folks, when the Tappan Zee Bridge will cease to be yet will remain forever a part of the area’s history.

There is it, that cut in the main span truss. Good to know parts of the bridge will be repurposed to state and local municipalities; a little eerie to realize this day, so far into the future nearly six years ago — during my first bridge meeting at the Quay Condominium in Tarrytown — would finally arrive.

Seven months ago, the last car drove its 3.1 miles. The ginormous crane returns to help crews remove sections from the bridge’s main span. Moving forward, they continue to installing precast concrete deck panels near the Westchester landing and pouring concrete there.

Yesterday was eight miles. It’s more than three miles one way and the same walk back or there’s the Lower Hudson Transit Link.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Logging Miles before the Bridge Path Opens

It was raining by the time I got home last night, the sixth shared use path boot camp mile behind me.

Yes, readers, I’m getting ready for when the path opens next year as I plan to walk across one of the Hudson River’s widest points. The distance will be more than 3.1 miles when you include the Westchester and Rockland landings.

I’ve walked for exercise during the past few years, even when my knee and hip began to groan. The new hip joint, six and one-half weeks old today, helped me walk six miles during the past three days (two miles in one-mile stints every other day). Goal is to work up to two miles at a time, then three miles at a time.

These are in addition to walking for errands, etc. We’re talking pre-SUP training.

While the above photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority is from last November, it’s nice to know the path will be well-lit for those who want to bicycle or walk during shorter days and/or dusk. Hours are to be determined.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Progress Update: Condensed/Abbreviated Version

Your intrepid blogger and reporter has been down for the count with a cold. Two days after attending the holiday train show at The New York Botanical Garden, I felt a tickle in my throat.

Now that I’m breathing regularly again, and the Cepacol is working its magic, I’ll share that roller skating down the winding slope of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (above, part of the holiday show) is an item on my Bucket List.

Another one is walking from Westchester to Rockland on the new bridge’s path one way so I’d have a friend meet me in Rockland and drive me back.

The last blue structural steel girder was completed since yours truly last posted here. Crews began removing he two remaining tower cranes; the other two were removed this past summer. Crews are also building piers — you can see them in the photo above — near the Westchester shoreline.

Unseen from the road: a peek inside one of those giant blue structural steel girders/ NYSTA

Since the westbound span opened four months ago, the Tappan Zee Bridge has been disappearing, and more of the eastbound span is visible. This past week, crews installed the last four precast concrete pier caps near Westchester; installation continues, including on the Westchester and Rockland approaches, save for this and next weekends.

Check out progress since last month on Thruway Authority’s maintenance facility/NYSTA

Cute story:

A woman and her son, probably age 6 or 7, were on line behind me at the supermarket Thursday. He was carrying a bunch of carrots with the stems attached so I asked her if she peels and cooks them with a meal.

“No, they’re for the reindeer,” her son answered. “They have to eat, too.”

The woman added, “He wanted organic carrots, and I told him the reindeer won’t mind regular ones.”

Then she said to me with a smile (his back was to her), “Wait until he sees teeth marks on them the next morning.”

Have fun if you track Santa’s progress tonight on NORAD. There’s no snow here in southern Westchester; however, you never can tell. Merry Christmas Eve!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

%d bloggers like this: