Archive for the ‘South Nyack’ Tag

New Ride on Eastbound Span; SUP is Underway

Nice, roomy ride back to Westchester this afternoon that gave me a much closer look at what little remains of the Tappan Zee Bridge. I was in the right lane as cars whizzed by me.

It looks close for 160 feet apart; however, it’s an optical illusion from the driver’s seat. This is a better view of the old bridge than from the westbound span.

En route to Rockland, I wanted to see where the shared use path left the bridge. It was difficult to tell so I found where the path separated from the Thruway.

The newest span is open, it’s a smooth ride that offers a better view of what’s doing on the east side of the old bridge. Don’t forget to check the great view of the Hudson Valley heading westbound.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Eastbound Span fully open by Saturday Morning

Photo of new eastbound span/Mike Groll at the Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

The new eastbound span opens Friday night during the first of two traffic shifts, weather permitting (Shift 1). If you’re Westchester-bound, then plan for lane closures and brief traffic stops so workers can reconfigure the landings and stripe the lanes at both ends of the new span. This doesn’t affect westbound traffic.

There will be two traffic stops of up to 20 minutes on Westchester-bound lanes near Exit 10 in South Nyack for the Thruway Authority and crews to stage operations, stripe lanes and shift barriers and equipment. All four lanes will be open by 7 a.m. Saturday.

In coming weeks, Rockland-bound traffic will shift to the inner four lanes of the westbound lane (Shift 2) so the shared use path and overlooks can be built.

No, you cannot walk across the bridge yet, and yes, it’s an active construction site. For complete details, see here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Guest Blog: Group wants Historic and Symbolic ‘Tappan Zee’ Name added to the New Bridge

Photo of new eastbound span/Mike Groll at the Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

“Our organization was very pleased that the debate moderators asked about the Tappan Zee name change,” Marlene Pedersen, Board Member of the group Save Our Tappan Zee, Inc., said. “We would have liked Marcia Kramer to have given a bit more background when she asked the question since many New Yorkers may not be familiar with the issue. Overall, we were thankful and very pleased that the issue was included in the debate.”

Pedersen was talking about the primary debate with Democratic gubernatorial challenger Cynthia Nixon. “The bridge’s name reflects the area’s history, tradition and people,” she emphasized, “and it is not just a name. It predates our country’s founding as that area of the river was referred to in historical documents as the Tappan Zee Bay. ‘Tappan’ refers to the Tappan Tribe of Native Americans that inhabited the area and Zee refers to New York’s early Dutch settlers (‘zee’ means ‘sea’ in Dutch).

Familiar sign at the Rockland approach, and its counterpart in Westchester/Courtesy of Blair Johnson

“The governor’s refusal to acknowledge these facts and accept the compromise name (adding Tappan Zee to the bridge’s name) demonstrates a willful intention to put his own self-serving desires over the will of the people.”

Pedersen said the group feels while the state has more pressing issues for voters to consider when they choose a Democratic candidate this month, ‘We want New Yorkers to really think about this. There’s a principle here that should concern all of us, not just those living in the Hudson Valley. Are we OK with politicians stripping a region of its history and tradition without consulting the people?”

More than 110,000 people signed SOTZ’s petition to add ‘Tappan Zee’ to the new bridge’s name.

The original bridge was eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (under Criteria A and C in Appendix D – Preliminary Section 106 and 4(f) Analysis for Tappan Zee Bridge). The purportedly-100-year-old wood barge and its coal cargo submerged below – reminiscent of the river’s role in industry and commerce, and in the construction zone – were also recommended for the same prestigious award.

The Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge opened Dec. 1955/The Virtual Archives

SOTZ believes including the issue in the gubernatorial debate elevated its cause. “Marc Molinaro has stated he would return the TZ name if elected. Cynthia Nixon has shown empathy for our cause and has hinted she may consider doing the same. We look forward to continuing the fight during the election season and beyond.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Greeted by Nature Today at the Perfect Time

The Esposito Trail was sunny and empty save for the occasional bicyclist or person walking a dog. We politely smiled at one another as we passed, I with shoes and a jacket and a camera, they with shorts, tee shirts and sneakers. Not longer after I began walking I saw a black bird that posed for me, a contrast with the Thruway’s background traffic noise.

Even more remarkable was the white butterfly that gracefully flitted around me. I said, “Hi, daddy,” as I always do when nature comes near me, then asked it to please stop so I could take its picture. To my amazement, it glided gently to the ground in front of me and folded its wings, and after I clicked the camera button it flitted around me again before flying away.

I miss my dad so much it hurts at times. Tomorrow will be four and one-half-years to the day he left us. The word is died; that’s hard to say and even more painful to write. Today’s walk was peaceful even as I passed trees marked with orange dots and wooden posts tied with what looked like pink plastic and that had letters and numbers written on them.

Several trees on the South Nyack side (not the Thruway side) were down, and the fact that others were marked indicated what was to come. People walked in the middle of the path as I did, moving to the right when we approached each other from opposite directions.

To reiterate how I felt last year and still do, it’s hard to imagine what it will be like walking the trail, which will remain cinder, once the new path is built. Good news is I’ll still have to brush off the bottoms of my shoes before getting back into the car.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Disappearing Gusset Plates, New Bridge Fencing

“Where was this photo taken?” It looks like a westward view between the two spans from one of the new bridge’s three emergency turnaround lanes’ anti-climb fencing in this photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority. We’re told fencing will run the length of the bridge and shared use path save for where soundwalls are installed at each landing.

As the eastbound spans nears completion, the Tappan Zee Bridge continues to disappear per the above Thruway Authority photo. Crews are torching steel gusset plates off the old bridge, while other plates support the structure as the main span is being dismantled.

It’s expected the eastbound span will soon open, and then crews will turn their attention to the shared use path that will intersect the Esposito Trail in South Nyack. Going to walk it today.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

%d bloggers like this: