Archive for the ‘stay cables’ Tag

Close-up of new Lights; Name the Falcon Chicks

This is what the poles we try to see from the driver’s seat look like. Photo above is courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority; the one below is part of a blog post from five months earlier, when we caught a glimpse of the first LED roadway lighting stanchions (columns).

Also: two falcon chicks are out and about; the deadline for naming them is this Friday. Check out the bridge update by your intrepid reporter in this week’s Rockland County Times: first page of section two above the crease.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

New Falcon Chicks (two so far) need Names

This is the tree in front of the apartment, where my parents moved my brother and me nearly 50 years ago. Sometime at the end of June will be half a century.

I love this tree that turns pink for about two weeks before erupting into green leaves. This year it’s less dense because the gardeners trimmed lower branches.

What does this have to do with the bridge? Nothing. It’s a pretty tree and deserved recognition. However, high on the Tappan Zee Bridge nest box are new falcon chicks, and they need names.

Mama falcon’s watchful eye over her new little ones (seen behind in nest box)/EarthCam®

Two-way traffic will shift onto one of the immense new 3.1-mile spans, giving motorists a better view of work on the eastbound span.

Stay cable installation for the westbound span is complete; one-third (32) for the eastbound span are attached to their respective towers and tensioned to structural steel.

Crews are installing concrete noise barrier panels along the northbound Thruway in South Nyack this week and installing transparent acrylite noise barriers on the Rockland approach on the soon-to-open westbound span, readying it for motorists.

Watch for update with details in this Thursday’s Rockland County Times.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Sunrise on Bridges; More Stay Cables Installed

This awesome view of the sunrise was captured by Chris Lopez, a surveyor at New York Geomatics, Inc. He works on the new bridge’s towers before dawn and has a perfect view of each day’s awakening.

Can you tell which span they’re on? Hint: closest to the current bridge. You also see a stay cable right behind them. Crews anchored and tensioned 110 of an eventual 192 cables and continue installing them on the eastbound span this week.

Did you find the clues?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

More than half of 192 Stay Cables are in Place

old-and-new

Before you tell me to keep both eyes on the road and hands on the wheel: I did. Mom was with me and caught the late afternoon sun casting shadows.

“What are those pointed things on top?” she indicated with a finger.

I explained about the main span towers and the roadway and said the new bridge is supported differently than the current bridge is.

Nearly four years ago, the Visual Quality Panel let public decide if the new towers’ tops would be angled or squared. While vastly unlike the current bridge, the new one has more than 100 of its eventual 192 stay cables fully anchored and tensioned to the main span roadway.

Next was the eastbound span (visible until it ended), bright blue and higher than the Thruway. “Are we going to drive on that?” she asked.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

There’ll be no Rhythmic Bumps on New Bridge

bridge

Driving across the current bridge is sometimes an interactive experience.

Motorists see the construction progress — most noticeably, that self-climbing jump forms were removed from all eight main span towers, revealing their chamfered tops. They can also feel and hear their three-mile trip, thanks to nearly 200 expansion joints that absorb the bridge’s steel and concrete slight expansions and contractions.

No rhythmic bumps on the new bridge, which will have 12 such joints on the westbound span and 11 joints on the eastbound span.

About the overhead gantries:

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) will monitor conditions on the new spans and automatically inform the Thruway Authority staff about disruptions. Connections with law enforcement, first responders and tow truck operators will help minimize impacts from lane closures and accidents. Connections with the Thruway’s larger traffic management network will help synchronize operations, maintenance and repairs.

* * * * *

More than 85 of the 192 stay cables, ranging from 190 to 623 feet long, that will support the main span roadways were anchored the towers and tensioned to outside sections of structural steel the crews. That’s more than 700 miles’ worth of steel reaching from Tarrytown to Cincinnati.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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