Archive for the ‘stay cables’ Tag

Sights and Stops from South Nyack to Tarrytown

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These pictures from Friday’s walk are randomly sequenced. People were friendly, the views were spectacular, I enjoyed seeing the bridge and landings art . . . and realized I’d missed something. One of several reasons to return. Till next time!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2020

Flashback Friday: Two Years Ago Today

early-august-2016

This photo was taken in early August, when the towers were nearing their eventual heights. The new bridge is more even (less grade) so trucks won’t have to do what my neighbor calls “stop for air,” referring to their use of air brakes and shifting as needed on the current bridge.

Assembled more than 15 months ago, blue jump forms will be repurposed./© H. Hackson

Assembled more than 15 months ago, blue jump forms will be repurposed./© H. Hackson

You see a construction vehicle, right? Now look closely at what’s ON it.

Crews continue removing the self-climbing forms that helped build the main span towers during the past 15 months. They’re driven off the bridge — the westbound span is connected to land — to be repurposed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

LHV Engineering Expo: 15th Annual STEM Event

As the bridge project met and hit timeline markers, your intrepid reporter met one of her own: last Sunday I attended the Lower Hudson Valley Engineering Expo at White Plains High School. Yes, my then four-and-one-half week new hip and I.

The first photo includes a black strand sticking up from the cross-section of stay cable. The photo above shows the top of that section with wires bundled into it.

Everyone wanted to see how heavy the section of 18-gauge galvanized rebar was compared to the residential rebar. I wonder if anyone tried to pick up the section of cement.

There were oyster shells — I put two up to my ear and thought I heard a whoosh although not like the ocean — and furry friends like this fish to show the project was protecting life below the bridge.

Weather not withstanding as spring is hiding somewhere, the day of companies, experiments, college and universities, learning and contests was a success. It was reigning STEM. You’re smiling if you understand the reference, and please pardon the pun if you don’t.

Watch for story about kids’ fascination with —  and how they’re learning about — STEM topics and activities in the May 2018 issue of Westchester Family.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

TBT: Main Span Towers’ Topping Off Ceremony

It’s Throwback Thursday, and you know what that means: this time last year, media had an exclusive, first-time look at the new westbound span. I’ve said at earlier times and repeat, the project is colorful: the I Lift NY, bright blue structural steel girders, red and yellow cranes, blue jump forms, yellow guard rails.

Governor Cuomo braved freezing temps without gloves, hat or scarf during the topping ceremony for the new bridge’s eight main span towers.

Facing north: one of the new main span towers high above the Hudson River/© H. Jackson

I looked at the stay cables tensioned under the main span and the girders peeking out from under the Westchester approach, where we stood, and at the rebar along the northern side of what would eventually be the shared use path and at the jump forms atop the towers and at the road deck built east from the main span (built west, too, that we couldn’t see).

The photo to the right — one of the towers with stairs leading to the top — got me thinking about how nervous I was in high school gym class if the teacher asked us to stand on the balance beam or sit on the lower of two uneven parallel bars.

Last year was an experience, surpassed only by the opening ceremony this past August.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

E’bound Main Span Steel, all Stay Cables in Place

Earlier this week, crews set the last section of main span steel on the eastbound span. Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

You want numbers? Here they are:

The section was 24 feet long, adding to the more than 74 million pounds of all-American-made steel and concrete across the 2,230-foot cable-stayed part of the bridge. In case you were wondering, all 192 stay cables are now installed.

One more month, and bye-bye Tappan Zee Bridge drive. Eastbound traffic joins westbound traffic on the newly-opened span so the TZB’s landings can be demolished, and the eastbound span can be connected . . . because car-jumping from approach span to land is prohibited.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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