Archive for the ‘structural steel’ Tag

LHV Engineering Expo: 15th Annual STEM Event

As the bridge project met and hit timeline markers, your intrepid reporter met one of her own: last Sunday I attended the Lower Hudson Valley Engineering Expo at White Plains High School. Yes, my then four-and-one-half week new hip and I.

The first photo includes a black strand sticking up from the cross-section of stay cable. The photo above shows the top of that section with wires bundled into it.

Everyone wanted to see how heavy the section of 18-gauge galvanized rebar was compared to the residential rebar. I wonder if anyone tried to pick up the section of cement.

There were oyster shells — I put two up to my ear and thought I heard a whoosh although not like the ocean — and furry friends like this fish to show the project was protecting life below the bridge.

Weather not withstanding as spring is hiding somewhere, the day of companies, experiments, college and universities, learning and contests was a success. It was reigning STEM. You’re smiling if you understand the reference, and please pardon the pun if you don’t.

Watch for story about kids’ fascination with —  and how they’re learning about — STEM topics and activities in the May issue of Westchester Family.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Westchester Landing Removal & Lane Closures

And away it goes! Sections of Thruway near the Westchester landing say goodbye to the land this week, when crews begin removing them to make way for new precast concrete slabs. Click here for information about lane closures this week.

This is how the Thruway will connect to the land . . . and another reason the floating Tappan Zee Bridge-park was not a good idea.

Back to the picture above. Wouldn’t it make a pretty desktop wallpaper for your laptop or computer? Do you recognize the pattern?

It’s a tiny area of the more than 100,000 tons of welded (structural steel) beams supporting the roadway. Photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Oh, and remember the article I mentioned earlier about infrastructure, the new bridge and federal spending? You can read it here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Eastbound Span Increases as TZB Decreases

This photo showing the angle we see from the other side (while heading west) is straight from the project’s newest tower webcam via EarthCam® construction cameras. If you click the photo, then you can see the I Lift NY setting structural steel near the Westchester shoreline.

Been a while since I posted: while I was away getting a new hip joint, the super crane’s been busy! Last weekend it was installing deck panels on the eastbound span so that you and your vehicle will have a safe ride. President Barack Obama and Governor Andrew Cuomo both talked about holes in the Tappan Zee Bridge’s roadway.

“At times you can see the river through the cracks of the pavement,” Obama said during his May 2014 visit to Tarrytown. “Now, I’m not an engineer, but I figure that’s not good.”

“They keep doing these patch jobs on the Tappan Zee Bridge, including those very heavy metal plates over holes in the Tappan Zee Bridge,” Cuomo said during remarks to the North America Building Trades Union’s Legislative Conference in April 2016.

“And when you go over the heavy metal plates, you see the truck in front of you bounces just a little bit, and then you see a little light coming through from the corner of the plate,” he said. “I would always take my seat belt off when I was going over the Tappan Zee Bridge. I was getting ready to swim, I would take off my shoes, and I would open the window. I was ready.”

In the above photo, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority, cranes are installing said deck panels. They’ll be interlocked via their hairpin reinforcing steel bars, after which reinforcing concrete will be poured between the spaces (around the steel) prior to the final driving surface.

Enough excitement for now. Check back later for another blog post. Self-promo: my article about infrastructure, the new bridge and federal spending will go live next month in a national magazine.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Girders and Concrete make News this Week

Here’s a close-up of one of section of the approximately 50,000 tons of structural steel on the 196,416-inch long bridge’s approach spans. Above is the Westchester side.

They’re huge. HUGE.

Imagine seeing one of the six barges that accidentally came loose after last week’s storm and floated down the river to a town or village, maybe near you.

This week, crews will be installing them on the eastbound Rockland approach span using mobile cranes. The I Lift NY super crane gets to sit on the sidelines for this job.

Lots of concrete pours in the works, too, for the eastbound span’s abutment in Rockland and for the new state police facility in Tarrytown. Work continues on the Thruway Authority’s new maintenance facility.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2016

ICYMI: Scenes from around the Project Site

Wires? A huge bug? Nope. Per project officials, these are tubes that cooled the new bridge’s concrete pile caps via concrete cytalitic reaction. Too complex for me, suffice to say they helped make the new bridge stronger.

Photos 1, 3 and 4 are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

This colorful new view from steps near the clubhouse at Quay condominiums in Tarrytown differs from what residents living there saw when the project started.

Looking north from the Westchester landing, you can see piers from the Tappan Zee Bridge and the two new spans. The project slowed during the past few weeks due to bitterly cold temps that caused a frozen river.

Sweet photo. An astute eye snapped hungry mallard ducks befriending some of the crew. Before long, the Peregrine falcons will return to their home — on which bridge?

Rain, rain, go away. Come again another day. See this pipe affixed to the blue structural steel girders near the Westchester landing? It helps prevent flooding and is part of the new bridge’s drainage system.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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