Archive for the ‘structural steel’ Tag

Spring has Sprung: Nyack Buzzing with Activity

It was perfect weather to be outside Sunday, and Memorial Park in Nyack was packed with cars. We sat for a while under a tree — as luck would have it, there was a spot waiting for us — and took in the view.

This after checking out the Nyack Street Fair, always a fun experience.

That day marked five weeks since I was walking down steps and missed the step, falling and injuring my left knee and upper leg. Walking has become easier with cortisone shots, and I’ll be starting physical therapy next week. It was gorgeous outside, and I didn’t want to miss the day.

Birds flying everywhere, crowded viewing area, people enjoying the weather and checking out the bridge and the Spotter’s Guide and happy winter finally left. The giant crane was positioned near the Rockland shoreline, and people were taking pictures with their cell phones.

So when will the westbound span open? The summer before the project began, then state DOT Project Director Michael Anderson said traffic will switch to the new bridge sometime during the fourth year (2017).

Then we heard west/northbound traffic would move to the new span in December 2016, and two months later (February 2017) to move east/southbound traffic as well. Former Executive Director Robert L. Megna decided in early November to postpone the first opening until spring 2017.

Project officials are talking about “sometime this year.” I wonder if there are still built-in contract incentives for finishing the project before spring 2018 or penalties for completing it later? Is the bridge builder still on a 62-month schedule?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Engineering Expo and Recognizing Rebar

Today was a perfect chance to learn about the bridge project, what with plenty of experts at the Engineering Expo ready to answer questions. I bet you were there trying to stump one of them.

Not possible. You’d have learned, however, the main span towers are 1,200 feet apart at each end of the channel, and their platforms are 14 feet thick and more than 360 feet long. It took a lot of concrete — 11,000 cubic yards, to be exact — to fill them. And you’d have learned lots more.

While there I visited several exhibitors and, among other things, learned how sewers are relined using a sophisticated method. What caught my eye was an object on the table that was the same size and shape as something I’ve seen before.

I asked the woman if it was rebar; she said yes, it was, and seemed surprised I recognized it. Between you and me, I wouldn’t know a rebar sample from a hole in the wall had it not been for the educational outreach presentations. Speaking of which, check out photos from today here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Connecting Rockland Approach, a fifth Gantry and ongoing Main Span Channel Closures

Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse seen from the new bridge’s westbound span/© Janie Rosman 2016

Sleepy Hollow Lighthouse seen from the new bridge’s westbound span/© Janie Rosman 2016

Since media were invited onto the new westbound span, crews connected the Westchester approach and the main span, the Rockland approach and the main span are being connected, and there will soon be a fifth overhead gantry. Did we miss the fourth?

channel-closures

Tha main span navigation channel continues to be closed periodically until next December. While boaters may be pleased to hear this, I’d like to enjoy the spring, summer and fall before winter comes around again.

Click here for complete information.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Few More Glimpses around the NNYB Project Site

crane-completes-first-lift-of-2017-early-february

Did you see the I Lift NY making its 2017 debut lift on the Westchester side?

cold-weather

Crew member well-protected against the elements: BRR, it’s COLD out there!

pile-cap-for-eastbound-span-is-prepared-under-tzb

A pile cap for the as-yet-unfinished eastbound span prepared under the TZB.

structural-steel-connection

Not seen from the road: crews adjusting a section of steel for the main span.

Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

One Large Section of Structural Steel at a Time

In action: super crane connecting the Westchester approach and main spans/EarthCam®

In action: super crane connecting the Westchester approach and main spans/EarthCam®

Have you seen the westbound span? Last week crews connected the main span and the Westchester approach, and this week they’ll connect the main span and the Rockland approach with a 375-ton section of structural steel.

Getting there!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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