Archive for the ‘Tappan Zee Bridge’ Tag

Educational Outreach explains the Pulley System

This cool interactive demonstration at Stemtastics in Larchmont showed kids and parents how pulleys work to lift weights like structural steel on bridges.

The I Lift NY super crane’s versabar (system) can lift up to 1700 metric tons (1928 US tons), much-needed strength when lifting pieces of structural steel.

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It’s getting closer to when two-way traffic will shift to the the westbound span; however, I’m wondering how the belvederes will be constructed while cars are on that span. Will one lane be closed so crews can safely work on the shared use path? Will the belvederes be completed before traffic moves to the westbound span?

Here’s a view of the westbound span, where workers lower formwork over rebar. Getting there! Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

TBT: Looking Back at Earlier Project Photos

What are those things floating in the river? Debris? No, those are piles, and the story that day (June 2014 media tour) was pile cleansing: scooping out the muck prior to filling them with concrete and rebar (reinforced steel).

Did you notice the super crane is on the south side of the bridge? It had recently arrived at the project site, where crews waited for low tide a few days later before limbo-ing it under the current bridge.

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Oh my, how tiny it looks at ground level. This is from early September 2015, when crews began building those now-419-foot tall towers using self-climbing jump forms. Are those cartoon heads in the red truck?

Here’s a memory from days gone by, when tolls were 50 cents each way. One-way collection was adopted August 12, 1970, and toll booths on the northbound lanes were removed.

And guess what? We made it through the Ides of March. Ha!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Bridge Project photos on a snowy Pi (3.14) Day

March never ceases to amaze: we March(ed) forth days ago, and today’s a play on words, Pi Day. May the Ides of March weather be gentle. We’ll see.

Pretty scene last night with the fiery sunset as backdrop to the new bridge’s towers. Here’s the same view 18 hours later: looks a bit different, right?

By 9:30 a.m., one of the Peregrine falcons ventured out to see what’s doing, and by 11 am. (a snow lull), it was back inside and discussing its findings.

Photos 2, 3 and 4 courtesy of EarthCam® Construction Cameras.

Today I’m fact-checking and editing an article about the project for an upcoming deadline. When it’s published, I’ll post the link here. Happy Pi Day!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Peregrine Falcons’ Last Clutch in Current Home

Three months ago I looked across at the Tappan Zee Bridge and wondered if the falcon nest was over there on a beam. It moves to a new home this year.

This will be the last year the Peregrine falcon mama hatches her eyases — word has it she’s pregnant — in her current home/nest before moving day.

Looking fly (no pun intended): basking in the bright sunshine/Photo courtesy of EarthCam®

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Counting down to the westbound span opening

new-and-old

Early yesterday I had part of the bridge — from the Westchester approach until the start of the main span — to myself. NO cars, trucks, vans, nothing. So I slowed a little bit (making sure no one was behind me) and snapped.

If the bridge could talk, then here’s what it would say:

Yesterday I felt tired and a little sad. I mean, wouldn’t you? Imagine watching them train your replacement at work because they’re letting you go: I’m only here until they finish the first span.

There are others my age and older who are around longer than I — the Bear Mountain Bridge (1924), the Mid-Hudson Bridge (1930) and the Rip Van Winkle Bridge (1935) come to mind — yet they’re replacing me.

True, I’m a three-miler; however, think about it. Was this the best place to build me? Some think not — the topic lends itself to controversy — yet here they chose.

main-span

The new bridge next to me is much taller than I am, which doesn’t diminish me. I have history here and stories to tell, and I bet you didn’t know I’ve kept secrets, too. Even with four lanes in each direction it’ll be a not-so-nice surprise when people realize there will still be three highway lanes leading to and from in Rockland. We’ll see how they plan for traffic in Westchester.

It also means positive changes to both counties, especially to South Nyack, and parts of me will be used for other construction projects.

When you drive across my span I know you’re staring at the new bridge. I don’t blame you; I watch its progress every day. Even though they’ll take me apart this year I know your memories of me will stay long after I’m gone.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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