Archive for the ‘Tappan Zee Constructors’ Tag

South Nyack and Thruway Authority agree to collaborate on residents’ behalf

The quaint village resolved to hold the Thruway Authority to its word about working together to minimize the new TZ Bridge project’s impact on residents.

At the onset of their Tuesday village board meeting, trustees convened in executive session with special counsel Dennis E.A. Lynch to discuss the agency’s EDPL non-compliance and lack of efforts to demonstrate compliance. During a brief meeting Friday morning (May 12), trustees unanimously adopted a resolution to resolve issues discussed during that session.

The Rockland County Times reported on March 9, 2017, that neighborhood group Preserve South Nyack (PSN) identified multiple deficiencies in the agency’s EDPL proceedings.

In a resolution dated March 22, 2017, trustees said the Thruway Authority “must demonstrate full compliance with all notice and other provisions of the EDPL . . . “noting the village’s rights under appropriate EDPL provisions. It also said the village notified the agency of its concerns “and needs a more definitive, concrete and direct response and prompt resolution of those concerns . . . “

State representatives met with Christian and village officials on May 4 to discuss concerns and to suggest appropriate ways of moving forward, addressing all impacts and definitively satisfying village concerns and impacts expressed that were not previously discusses or resolved.

In a letter to Christian dated May 8, 2017, Thruway Authority Acting Executive Director Bill Finch confirmed the May 4 meeting and indicated a desire “to help preserve the character of your village and to mitigate the impacts associated with the construction of the new NY Bridge Project.”

Citing the state’s willingness to relocate the path’s terminus in 2015 as “perhaps the most indicative of our enduring commitment to the Village,” Finch said the Thruway Authority reaffirm(s) its commitment to support South Nyack’s goal of achieving fiscal sustainability helping it apply for non-bridge-related grants.

He continued, “In addition to the Community Benefits Program (CBP) study of Interchange 10 mentioned above, the Authority stands ready to work with the Village in its acquisition and redevelopment of surplus property at Interchange 10 once any future reconfiguration of the Interchange is complete.”

If South Nyack determines the agency does not keep its word re the mitigations and its “acquisition and reedevelopment of surplus property at Interchange 10 once any future reconfiguration of the Interchange is complete,” then village officials will consider appropriate action.

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times May 18, 2017.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Thruway Authority replies to Residents’ Concerns

Trail head of walking/bicycle path and Esposito Trail/K. Wolf

With the new bridge and path set to open sometime in 2018, the South Nyack Tappan Zee Bridge Task Force and village board held a workshop last Tuesday prior to the bi-monthly board meeting. Task force member Don McMahon moderated the meeting aimed at clarifying concerns brought to the Thruway Authority regarding traffic, safety, lighting and maintenance.

Now that the exit ramp at Clinton Avenue and South Franklin Street will become a T-intersection — with one stop sign at the ramp’s end to streamline traffic and lessen the occurrence of motorists who make less-than-full stops — some asked how buses will make the sharp turn. As the design was requested by the village and recommended by the state DOT, project officials will check for additional details.

Conceptual rendering of side path and Esposito Trail/K. Wolf

Speed calming measures for bicyclists will be added to the path, and two sets of spring-loaded gates will be added where the path and the Esposito Trail meet the street. Bicyclists will need to dismount to cross Clinton Avenue; pedestrians will have a signal designed in accordance with federal guidelines.

“We send two guys down the trail to do maintenance,” Superintendent of Public Works James Johnson noted, “so if we have spring-loaded gates that we have to hold open, now three of us have to go down there to do maintenance.”

Emergency vehicles will have access from the parking lot and the Esposito Trail/side path. Physical impediments, such as the bollards at the trailhead on Clinton Street, will be removable.

The path will be maintained by the state, and state police will provide security for the path and facilities. Mayor Bonnie Christian said a future meeting with the village police chief, state police and a representative from Governor Cuomo’s office will discuss security and maintenance.

Parking lot at Rockland terminus; stairs lead to path/K. Wolf

Where will small children ride their bicycles? “My kids ride their bikes on that side, and that’s one of my worries,” Kendol Leader said. Project officials agreed parents may want their children to use the trail.

Both the trail and path will measure 10 feet wide save for the first 150 feet from the trailhead at Clinton Avenue and South Franklin Street, where the side path will be eight feet wide as an additional bicycle speed calming measure.

One person commented about feeling “fenced in” when walking the trail after its redesign; another wanted to know about the new lighting. Fences will range from 42 inches to 72 inches, depending upon location, and final dimensions may change slightly.

“Dark sky lighting is significantly different from lighting we’re all used to,” trustee Catherine McCue explained. “The lighting cast is much softer, and the area it’s cast in is much more contained. It’s significantly softer and easier on the eyes.”

McMahon said it’s his understanding that contracts will be completed by summer, and work will commence by early fall, McMahon said.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Super Crane Limbos Again — under Three Spans

There’s something a little different about this photo . . . /EarthCam® construction camera

Have you figured out what’s different about this photo? C’mon, you must have guessed. Here’s another hint from 14 hours earlier in the day.

Now you see it, now you don’t: super crane has moved!/EarthCam® construction camera

The project team kept silent about a certain three-span maneuver (focusing our attention on other doings); your intrepid reporter received a tip.

Back on the southern side 31 months after arriving here/EarthCam® construction camera

No crane in sight, and then it appeared on the other side of the Tappan Zee. Thank you to the source who alerted me yesterday afternoon.

Crane clears the Tappan Zee Bridge/© Janie Rosman 2014

It must have been tricky since the two new spans are considerably higher than the current bridge. You remember the planning involved last time, right? It limboed under the bridge — aided by extra low tide that added an extra foot or two of clearance — two days after its arrival.

With that in mind, the unspoken question on many people’s minds is, “When?”

If the original plans had been followed, then the westbound span would have opened in late 2016: west/northbound traffic was to have moved to the new span in December, and two months later, in February 2017, east/southbound traffic was to have moved to that span.

Hmm.

I recall hearing the bridge builder has incentives for completing the full bridge and all its accents by March/April 2018, and there would be penalties “if the Thruway Authority isn’t handed the keys to the new bridge by that date or if it’s completed even one day later.”

Said by a source working on the project. Were these guidelines abandoned?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spring has Sprung: Nyack Buzzing with Activity

It was perfect weather to be outside Sunday, and Memorial Park in Nyack was packed with cars. We sat for a while under a tree — as luck would have it, there was a spot waiting for us — and took in the view.

This after checking out the Nyack Street Fair, always a fun experience.

That day marked five weeks since I was walking down steps and missed the step, falling and injuring my left knee and upper leg. Walking has become easier with cortisone shots, and I’ll be starting physical therapy next week. It was gorgeous outside, and I didn’t want to miss the day.

Birds flying everywhere, crowded viewing area, people enjoying the weather and checking out the bridge and the Spotter’s Guide and happy winter finally left. The giant crane was positioned near the Rockland shoreline, and people were taking pictures with their cell phones.

So when will the westbound span open? The summer before the project began, then state DOT Project Director Michael Anderson said traffic will switch to the new bridge sometime during the fourth year (2017).

Then we heard west/northbound traffic would move to the new span in December 2016, and two months later (February 2017) to move east/southbound traffic as well. Former Executive Director Robert L. Megna decided in early November to postpone the first opening until spring 2017.

Project officials are talking about “sometime this year.” I wonder if there are still built-in contract incentives for finishing the project before spring 2018 or penalties for completing it later? Is the bridge builder still on a 62-month schedule?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Paving the Way for New Maintenance Facility

While there’s no more door — at least not that door — there are, however, formwork and walls for the new maintenance facility being built in Tarrytown.

Start of the Thruway Authority facility at the Westchester shared use path landing/NYSTA

This time last year the toll plaza in Tarrytown was demolished, and traffic methodically shifted lanes during the transition until cashless tolling began.

Only a few days remain until the electronic toll gantry is activated/© Janie Rosman 2016

And while fares have increased significantly in the past 50-plus years, through 2020 they’ll remain at status quo: cars pay $5 cash, $4.75 with E-ZPass®, and commuters pay $3 (20-trip booklet for $60).

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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