Archive for the ‘Tappan Zee Constructors’ Tag

Last Piece of Tappan Zee floats in Hudson River

You can see the west anchor span floating atop barges in the river south of the new bridge and not far from its former location. The New York State Thruway Authority photo above is from last week; the former anchor now points south and not east.

It’s odd not to see a portion of the old bridge to the south of the new one; I was surprised to see the span still close by. Here’s a final look at the span next to the new bridge:

Today’s trip to Nyack and Nanuet was bookmarked by vehicles speeding across the westbound and eastbound spans at more than 65 miles per hour. There seem to be no way to enforce the speed limit unless police install those devices that measure speeds. It’s one way for the state to make money instead of increasing the tolls.

Something to think about. I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

TZB West Anchor Span Removal and Dismantling

Governor Cuomo was at the project site yesterday to document final removal of the Tappan Zee Bridge, whose east anchor span fell after a controlled demolition early this year. Now in the Hudson River, it will be lifted and removed.

Top of east anchor span that will be lifted, removed from river bottom/© Press Office

While the old bridge became property of the design-build team, the state had an interest in how and when it was removed from the river. Last spring, the main span was lowered onto a bard and removed, and pieces of that span became part of the artificial reefs being built off Long Island.

Remaining west anchor span will be lowered into barges and removed./© Press Office

The remaining west anchor span, attached by four columns, was cut and is being lowered onto barges, then moved south and dismantled.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Perfect Spot for NYC Fireboat John D. McKean

A few days ago I wrote about the safety turnarounds on the westbound span that would aid first responders in case of emergencies. Last week I went to Sleepy Hollow to see the New York City Fireboat John D. McKean. She sat quietly at the end of a pier near Horan’s Landing, and I wondered why people said she blocked their view. There wasn’t much to see nearby; the new bridge and Rockland shores were quite visible.

True, it’s not my neighborhood; however, why the fuss? She is part of history and saved lives after one of our country’s most horrific attacks. This seems a perfect location. The nearby boats and equipment that belong to consortium Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) are an eyesore; the brightly colored vessel is an addition.

Less than one-half mile south at the Tarrytown viewing area, people were talking about the new and old bridges. One couple drove from New York City and asked how long it would take by train to get to Tarrytown; one friend was explaining to another how crews removed the Tappan Zee Bridge’s center section and, later, its eastern anchor span via controlled demolition.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Five Years Ago Today: Transit Recommendations

The jughandle turn to Route 119 is further north/Courtesy of Ian C. Ligget

Early speculation that bus rapid transit would start day one the new bridge opened in 2018 was correct, per the Final Transit Recommendations released after the final committee meeting last month in Tarrytown.

Possibly bus stops in Rockland County include: Chestnut Street Suffern, Campbell Avenue/Herrion Road Suffern, Rt. 306 Monsey, Spring Valley Transit Center, Nanuet Park & Ride, The Shops at Nanuet®, Palisades Center, Lot J, Macy’s, Nyack Hospital, Main Street, Nyack and Interchange 10 on the Thruway in South Nyack.

“It is important to note that many other transit options were considered by the (31-member) MTTF, including commuter and light rail options,” per a disclaimer. Ideas for the short-term (now through 2018), mid-term (15 years after the bridge is built), and long-term (2033 and beyond) now face land use and financial challenges.

One money source is the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) Discretionary Grant program, through which $600 million was recently made available.

While the new system changes transportation options within and between Westchester and Rockland, based on studies indicating increased commuting within counties than to New York City, “Local jurisdictions will have to be consulted about whether priority transit can be done,” ARUP engineer Trent Lethco, AICP said.

If the free WiFi, better seats and covered station stops don’t attract riders, maybe the unified fare system, or priority transit will: BRT is a guaranteed 25 percent faster on local roads, 20 percent so on I-287.

Money and time savers were music to South Nyack resident Annie Hekker Weiss, who spends two hours daily in transit to work. “That’s four extra hours every day to pay a babysitter for commuting time. Thank you for helping to figure this out for us.”

“South Nyack has been recommended for a $250,000 grant through the NNYB Community Benefit Program to study Interchange 10 and potential development opportunities surrounding it,” the summary said. Ramp metering and signal upgrades are proposed for Route 59, and a future study will decide if a new Thruway exit, Interchange 14X near Airmont/Viola/Monsey, can relieve traffic on that route.

And while the new bridge’s $300 million worth of structural strength can support future rail, there’s no place to build it — now. One short-term improvement calls for an I-287 corridor study to reserve (search for) space in case new facilities are desired. “Today there is insufficient room to allow for the introduction of new measures to improve transit or transportation performance,” the summary said.

Seven proposed routes (three between the counties, three within Westchester, and one connecting Westchester to the Bronx) will connect with transit hubs, including the Palisades Center, downtown Nyack, the Shops at Nanuet, downtown Suffern, and Westchester County Airport.

Earlier-omitted travel routes were needs were added back — Suffern-to-Yonkers via a transfer at Spring Valley, Port Chester-to-Suffern trips via a Valhalla transfer — as was Tarrytown Mayor Drew Fixell’s suggestion to revisit the Tarrytown-to-White Plains segment of I-287 see what improvements can be made.

White Plains will get a new transit hub, thanks to White Plains Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC)’s $1 million study grant. Also in mid-term plans are Exit 11 reconstruction, West-of-Hudson rail improvements, and a new in-line BRT at the Palisades Center. East-west trains, and passenger service on the West Shore line, are planned for the long-term; the groups suggested talks with NYSDOT, MTA, and New Jersey Transit.

The invisible elephant appeared when Westchester League of Conservation Voters Board Member John Nonna commented, “The level of where you set the toll will determine the level of mass transit that will be considered.”

“Who will take the initiative to make sure the recommendations will move forward?” State Assemblywoman Amy Paulin (88th District) asked. State DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald replied, “Our charge was to make recommendations. It’s up to the governor and the Thruway Authority to see what are the next steps.”

My article originally appeared in the Rockland County Times March 4, 2014.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Westchester Landing, Path Terminus take Shape

Landing under construction on August 2017, opening day westbound span/©J Rosman

The above photo was taken as our media bus made its way to the westbound span’s opening day ceremony 18 months ago. Check out the progress (below): crews are building foundation walls for the path terminus, building retaining walls, installing rebar and pouring concrete and filling previously dug holes (backfilling).

Shared use path Westchester landing leading to welcome center in Tarrytown/NYSTA

While construction is not visible from the road, you can’t miss the towers. Mom hasn’t driven across the bridge in nearly two years and wants to see it; the towers were topped with blue jump forms the last time she saw them (about two year ago).

Looking north where shared use path meets Westchester landing in Tarrytown/NYSTA

The bridge did open within the 62 month deadline (January 2013 to March 2018). Was the side path on the westbound span also factored into the timeline? I’m guessing not. Also scheduled to open this year are the maintenance facility, welcome center and new police barracks.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

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