Archive for the ‘Westchester County’ Tag

Final Steel Truss Section of TZB is Now Gone

A tugboat with a steel truss section of what was once the Tappan Zee Bridge/NYSTA

Another steel truss section of the bridge we will miss went bye-bye last week. The above photo shows the final section that was once underneath the roadway we used to drive on.

Although the trusses are barged elsewhere, one section of the old bridge’s steel cage can be recognized south of the new bridge. Crews are disassembling the 10-million pound, 532-foot section in the river.

While the super crane was dispatched to the Bronx to help Amtrak, it’s still on the project and will continue to help crews dismantle the Tappan Zee Bridge so the new bridge’s eastbound span, now one solid piece from Rockland to Westchester, can finally be finished.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Last Steel Girder Installed on Eastbound Span

Rare sight was a cargo barge heading north on the Hudson River/© Janie Rosman 2018

Let’s hear it for the cargo ship that passed our boat heading north less than half an hour after we left Haverstraw Marina. We heard these ships were seldom seen. Our luck to see one that day!

The 11-mile trip to the bridges was eventful and fun; however, things got going as we rounded Hook Mountain, and the bridges were in sight. It was “the bridges” because — although a shell of its former self — the Tappan Zee Bridge is there. A section of its main span missing was missing as it was prior to completion in the photo below, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Its proximity to the new bridge made it difficult to photograph it from the same distance; however, it was possible to capture the same angle looking north.

Same angle: close to its end instead of approaching opening day /© Janie Rosman 2018

For everyone who wanted to see the new bridge, there were many who wanted one last look at the Tappan Zee. Crews installed the last steel girder yesterday near Rockland, so now it’s possible to walk from one county to the other on the eastbound span. Photo below courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Barge-based cranes will next dismantle section two (south of the opening), a cantilever truss weighing 4,560 tons; strand jacks will then help lower section three (closest to Westchester), an anchor span weighing 5,350 tons, onto barges. Crews will then dismantle section four (next to the opening) and lower section five (closest to Rockland).

The timetable for removing the remaining sections is unknown; however, July 20 is the last Historical Society of Rockland County boat tour.. For information, visit https://www.rocklandhistory.org.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Disappearing from the River Piece by Piece

Looking as gloomy and sad as the weather, the Tappan Zee Bridge’s dissected main span glared at drivers or so it seemed. I was driving home in early afternoon after viewing the old bridge and its replacement from river level on a paddle wheeler. It was a treat made sweeter by a new hip joint that allowed me to painlessly walk around on both levels of our tour boat. And those were steep stairs!

The bridge that holds memories for many was rapidly shrinking and seemed small next to the eight main span towers and their supporting stay cables. Nearly two years ago, I penned a blog post that might have been what the bridge would have said if it could talk. The bridge. It will always be the bridge.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

My Thoughts: Cyclists go S-L-O-W-L-Y on SUP

The above photo is courtesy of Walkway Over the Hudson Historic State Park. You can see there is plenty of room for walking and bicycling, even side-by-side bicycling. Now check out far right lane of the new bridge’s westbound span below.

To the right of the broken line is where the shared use path will be built. Do they look the same? No. Are they the same width? No. Do you think a cyclist or a group of cyclists can safely rush to meet a train in Tarrytown or to get home after work if people are walking leisurely? You decide.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Accompanied by Springsteen & Heading Home

Walking’s a lot easier, and my shoe is less snug. Means my foot is not as swollen with help from compression hose. Ugh. Putting the hose on my surgical leg is easier with the sock helper; removing it is another story. Still, I persist and so far have walked 14 miles in two weeks.

Shared use path, I’m getting ready for you! The above photo was taken last year en route to the opening ceremony for the westbound span.

And as the path takes shape, and the eastbound span nears completion, there remains the Tappan Zee Bridge. Cuts in the truss can only mean one thing, so I’m going to wax nostalgic and go back in time. For everyone who considers Rockland County “upstate,” this is for you:

October 1975. “Born to Run” is blasting on the bus radio, as we Westchesterites and Long Islanders fly through Rockland County. The SUCO bus left Oneonta at 4 p.m., and we’re due to arrive at the County Center at 8:30 p.m.

Then we see it, the Tappan Zee Bridge. While I’m glad to be back for the weekend — and looking forward to catching up with friends I’ve not seen in two months — I’m unprepared for the little shiver that runs through me.

I chose the upstate New York college for its nutrition program, then wondered what made me think chemistry would be easier than in high school? The following year I transferred to community college, switched majors, and worked part-time.

The bridge was nearly 20, the average age on that bus; Bruce, not much older.

It was a chartered bus, where you step up into seats on either side of the aisle; above them, compartments hold luggage and coats. In those seats, some teenagers are dozing, some are watching the bridge — illuminated against the dark sky — move closer, others are belting out, “Tramps like us baby we were born to run!”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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