Archive for the ‘Westchester County’ Tag

New Ride on Eastbound Span; SUP is Underway

Nice, roomy ride back to Westchester this afternoon that gave me a much closer look at what little remains of the Tappan Zee Bridge. I was in the right lane as cars whizzed by me.

It looks close for 160 feet apart; however, it’s an optical illusion from the driver’s seat. This is a better view of the old bridge than from the westbound span.

En route to Rockland, I wanted to see where the shared use path left the bridge. It was difficult to tell so I found where the path separated from the Thruway.

The newest span is open, it’s a smooth ride that offers a better view of what’s doing on the east side of the old bridge. Don’t forget to check the great view of the Hudson Valley heading westbound.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Guest Blog: Group wants Historic and Symbolic ‘Tappan Zee’ Name added to the New Bridge

Photo of new eastbound span/Mike Groll at the Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

“Our organization was very pleased that the debate moderators asked about the Tappan Zee name change,” Marlene Pedersen, Board Member of the group Save Our Tappan Zee, Inc., said. “We would have liked Marcia Kramer to have given a bit more background when she asked the question since many New Yorkers may not be familiar with the issue. Overall, we were thankful and very pleased that the issue was included in the debate.”

Pedersen was talking about the primary debate with Democratic gubernatorial challenger Cynthia Nixon. “The bridge’s name reflects the area’s history, tradition and people,” she emphasized, “and it is not just a name. It predates our country’s founding as that area of the river was referred to in historical documents as the Tappan Zee Bay. ‘Tappan’ refers to the Tappan Tribe of Native Americans that inhabited the area and Zee refers to New York’s early Dutch settlers (‘zee’ means ‘sea’ in Dutch).

Familiar sign at the Rockland approach, and its counterpart in Westchester/Courtesy of Blair Johnson

“The governor’s refusal to acknowledge these facts and accept the compromise name (adding Tappan Zee to the bridge’s name) demonstrates a willful intention to put his own self-serving desires over the will of the people.”

Pedersen said the group feels while the state has more pressing issues for voters to consider when they choose a Democratic candidate this month, ‘We want New Yorkers to really think about this. There’s a principle here that should concern all of us, not just those living in the Hudson Valley. Are we OK with politicians stripping a region of its history and tradition without consulting the people?”

More than 110,000 people signed SOTZ’s petition to add ‘Tappan Zee’ to the new bridge’s name.

The original bridge was eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (under Criteria A and C in Appendix D – Preliminary Section 106 and 4(f) Analysis for Tappan Zee Bridge). The purportedly-100-year-old wood barge and its coal cargo submerged below – reminiscent of the river’s role in industry and commerce, and in the construction zone – were also recommended for the same prestigious award.

The Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge opened Dec. 1955/The Virtual Archives

SOTZ believes including the issue in the gubernatorial debate elevated its cause. “Marc Molinaro has stated he would return the TZ name if elected. Cynthia Nixon has shown empathy for our cause and has hinted she may consider doing the same. We look forward to continuing the fight during the election season and beyond.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Five Dollars for the Next 16 Months, and Then?

“We don’t know how much we will we get from the federal government, how much we will get from the state; there are state loans and grants we can access,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said nearly four years ago.

He was fielding questions about tolls and the task force he proposed in 2012 to address them while in Piermont to greet the newly-arrived super crane.

“Additional unknowns are the built-in contract incentives for Tappan Zee Constructors, LLC (TZC) to finish the project before spring 2018 or penalties for completing it later. Once you have those numbers, then you can come up with a plan about how to do it, what commuters should pay, on-hour, off-hour, etc.,” he said.

The governor assured the task force will be formed “I think within the next year, certainly,” and commuters “should have to pay as little as possible.” Rumors have been that tolls could run as high as $14 per vehicle, but state officials have downplayed that possibility.

When asked about fares on the new bridge during last week’s primary debate with Democratic gubernatorial challenger Cynthia Nixon, Cuomo reiterated Thruway tolls will remain the same until at least 2020; fees going forward would depend on the state’s finances at the time. No mention of the task force that, per the Journal News, has disappeared.

What happened to those additional unknowns Cuomo cited four years ago? What happened to potential commuter discount options and a resident discount program? By the way, it’s coming around to fall 2018. Does this mean penalties for TZC will be factored into the new bridge’s tolls?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Final Steel Truss Section of TZB is Now Gone

A tugboat with a steel truss section of what was once the Tappan Zee Bridge/NYSTA

Another steel truss section of the bridge we will miss went bye-bye last week. The above photo shows the final section that was once underneath the roadway we used to drive on.

Although the trusses are barged elsewhere, one section of the old bridge’s steel cage can be recognized south of the new bridge. Crews are disassembling the 10-million pound, 532-foot section in the river.

While the super crane was dispatched to the Bronx to help Amtrak, it’s still on the project and will continue to help crews dismantle the Tappan Zee Bridge so the new bridge’s eastbound span, now one solid piece from Rockland to Westchester, can finally be finished.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Last Steel Girder Installed on Eastbound Span

Rare sight was a cargo barge heading north on the Hudson River/© Janie Rosman 2018

Let’s hear it for the cargo ship that passed our boat heading north less than half an hour after we left Haverstraw Marina. We heard these ships were seldom seen. Our luck to see one that day!

The 11-mile trip to the bridges was eventful and fun; however, things got going as we rounded Hook Mountain, and the bridges were in sight. It was “the bridges” because — although a shell of its former self — the Tappan Zee Bridge is there. A section of its main span missing was missing as it was prior to completion in the photo below, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Its proximity to the new bridge made it difficult to photograph it from the same distance; however, it was possible to capture the same angle looking north.

Same angle: close to its end instead of approaching opening day /© Janie Rosman 2018

For everyone who wanted to see the new bridge, there were many who wanted one last look at the Tappan Zee. Crews installed the last steel girder yesterday near Rockland, so now it’s possible to walk from one county to the other on the eastbound span. Photo below courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Barge-based cranes will next dismantle section two (south of the opening), a cantilever truss weighing 4,560 tons; strand jacks will then help lower section three (closest to Westchester), an anchor span weighing 5,350 tons, onto barges. Crews will then dismantle section four (next to the opening) and lower section five (closest to Rockland).

The timetable for removing the remaining sections is unknown; however, July 20 is the last Historical Society of Rockland County boat tour.. For information, visit https://www.rocklandhistory.org.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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