Archive for October, 2018|Monthly archive page

Be Careful: Trucks use Westbound Span Left Lanes

Yesterday was another day: went to run an errand in the afternoon and got stuck in early accumulating traffic. As traffic was shifted so crews could work on the path, the westbound span’s middle lanes became the two left lanes that trucks and trailers are supposed to avoid.

For this reason, I was surprised to see an 18-wheeler with Florida license plates to my right (I was in the far left lane) and even more surprised when I noticed the left signal blinking. The driver cut in front of me, and luckily I was going slower than the span’s speed limit. You can see how close the truck was as he began to move in front of my car — I have a 1998 Honda Civic LX sedan and not one of the newer cars with smaller hoods — without checking to see if he had enough room.

Turns out there was a two-car accident ahead in his lane. I moved two lanes to the right and was by now in the second-from-right lane. I passed the scene of the accident — looked like one car rear-ended another — and watched in horror as man from one of the cars took pictures with his cell phone. Worse yet, a little girl was also outside the cars. WHAT?

Further west was a stalled car in the far right lane that added to the accumulating traffic.

Because I don’t have a hands-free device I waited until I reached Exit 10 to call 911 and told the dispatcher I was in South Nyack and passed an accident on the westbound span of the new bridge. I didn’t say it; the dispatcher did. “Oh, the Tappan Zee?”

I also told the dispatcher a man got out of the car to take pictures and added, “He shouldn’t do that.” I hope no one was hurt. The span is temporarily similar to the old bridge: no shoulders in case of an accident and for disabled vehicles.

Be careful and stay safe.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

The Little Yellow Line next to the Esposito Trail

Had to see the trail for myself after reading posts and viewing pictures. I wasn’t prepared for my reaction and got teary as I stood on the corner while cars passed or turned around me. It looked barren and sad; no solace that signs pointing to a detour were posted.

The yellow line that was part of a parking concept a few years ago resulted in the destruction of nature and a path I liked to walk on occasion. I still don’t know why the bridge’s path had to enter a neighborhood. Why couldn’t it continue to the parking lot and connect from there with another route?

The little yellow line next to the Esposito Trail is coming and is the reality above.

“We want to ensure that the concept chosen will be the best for our residents and will eliminate parking from our streets while allowing for economic development,” Christian told the Rockland County Times Wednesday (from my 2015 article).

Relief that the SUP terminus was moved from the corner of Cornelison Avenue and South Broadway resulted in construction next to the Esposito Trail, where crews will build the shared use path spur.

I saw the above flowers growing to the left of the closed trail entrance and hope they weren’t uprooted. Nature is resilient and will bloom again in the spring. The bridge will not solve congestion from Port Chester to Suffern; it balloons onto the Sprain Brook Parkway’s exit lane as cars trying to merge onto I-287 are jockeying with cars that want to take Exit 2.

The new bridge has safety features and extra lanes; however, there have been numerous accidents and traffic jams during its short life. Did the extra lanes help? How will the traffic be resolved by adding bicycles lanes along Rockland and Westchester roads? Please don’t take more lanes from already congested routes.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Lower Hudson Transit Link starts this Month

Above is the westbound lane (from left to right): median shoulder, next two lanes for passenger cars only, next two lanes are travel lanes (not limited to passenger vehicles), then a bus lane/emergency access lane, then a shoulder and finally the path and overlooks. Renderings are from the NYS Department of Transportation.

Red/green ramp meter signals will be installed from Exit 14A in Rockland County to Exit 4 in Westchester County and will regulate vehicular flow entering the highway to manage roadway congestion. Three will be intalled in Westchester by the end of October 2018; the others will be installed in 2019 and 2020.

A dedicated lane on each span of the new bridge can save up to five minutes on typical weekday commutes and additional time travel when there are major traffic incidents. The state police also enforce proper lane use. Look for the lane on the eastbound span at the end of this month and on the westbound span when the new path is finished in 2019.

New York State Police will enforce traffic rules at the ramp meters; drivers who fail to stop at a red ramp meter light can be fined the equivalent of a regular traffic signal violation.

For information, visit http://www.dot.ny.gov/LHTL.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

New Windows and Info at Outreach Centers

Socks, sneakers and wheels indicate a sign of the path to come/NYS Thruway Authority

Last week, I visited Nyack Outreach Center and missed the bicycle spokes and socks. Interesting visuals; the inside showed the new path and six overlooks. Now that the bridge is finished, crews continue working on the path and landings, its buildings and the new state police headquarters.

The only thing the new bridge hasn’t changed is the traffic. Maybe one day?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Afternoon Traffic continues despite New Bridge

Here’s the view from Westchester Avenue this afternoon near 4 p.m. as traffic was backed beyond Exit 8 on I-287 eastbound. How did the new bridge resolve corridor congestion? This continues to be a familiar site.

It’s an average of 8.6 miles from the exit sign on Westchester Avenue in White Plains to 303 S. Broadway in Tarrytown. Wonder how long it took the drivers to reach the bridge?

* * * * *

Of all the ongoing work, what saddens me most is the Esposito Trail, closed for two months from Clinton Avenue and South Franklin Street to Village Hall. You’ll have to detour to South Broadway and through Elizabeth Place Park.

Per the project team:

“Additionally, crews will continue drilling and installing piles along Hillside Avenue, necessitating temporary lane closures. Flag persons will keep traffic moving by alternating the directional flow between east and west. Ramp construction will also continue for the new connection between Interchange 10 and Hillside Avenue.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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