Archive for the ‘Tarrytown’ Category

Getting Nowhere: Thruway on a Friday Afternoon

I took the above photo four years ago from the roof of the TIME Hotel in Nyack when its then-general manager gave me a tour of the construction site. Traffic is no problem when you’re watching it from afar. And now . . .

“Traffic is backed up to the (Garden State) Parkway north from the Thruway,” the local traffic reporter told me via my car radio. The westbound backup continued past Exit 5 into White Plains and probably to Exit 8 and beyond. Didn’t make it to the bridge.

Impatient truck drivers used every bit of the entrance lane from Elmsford to enter an overcrowded 287. Raise rolls on the Thruway? Yes! Let truckers pay more, lots more for clogging up the lanes and causing traffic to stall as they still slow down on the new bridge’s lessened decline past the main span.

The above photo, courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority, shows traffic shortly before 4 p.m. Thursday. How many trucks can you see among the vehicles?

Thruway Authority Executive Director Matthew J. Driscoll said the agency “will continue to keep tolls as low as possible on the bridge for all motorists while providing the resources necessary to support the user-fee supported system.”

Double the tolls for trucks.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Sweltering Heat and a Festive Time at the River

It seemed as if everyone else was oblivious to the oppressive heat and humidity tonight. A concert in Pierson Park filled the air with music while families picnicked on the grass. Students from the EF International Language Campus in Tarrytown climbed on the rocks and the wall around the viewing area, laughing and speaking their native languages as they took photos of each other with the slowly-turning-pink bridge as their backdrop.

One couple brought their dinner to a table at the viewing area; they, like others walking along the path and kids running around, seemed immune to the sweltering air. It was a perfect night to be near water.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Glimpses of the Project from the NYSTA’s Lens

The scenic overlooks are taking shape. Seen from below is Fish and Ship, which is closest to Rockland. When finished, it will look like this:

This is a pretty view from the river between the spans and very different from the underbelly of the Tappan Zee Bridge.

The rebar-reinforced concrete wall extends the length of the bridge and will separate the westbound span’s shoulder from the new path.

Here’s why (bottom of page) you won’t see the falcon’s nest from the road. All photos are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

As the western anchor span that helped support the Tappan Zee Bridge shrinks, crews continue working on state police Troop T’s new headquarters on the Thruway’s south side and the visitor center and maintenance facility on the north side, both near the Westchester landing, The new path is taking shape; you can see its entrance from that landing onto the bridge.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

A Full Circle Day, and in More Ways than One

Standing on steps near Quay Condominium clubhouse in Tarrytown/© Janie Rosman

People ask about photos I take and post in this blog; twice an editor asked to reprint two and paid me. Today I had a photo request from someone, and that request made me realize my reporting about the bridge project has come full circle in more ways than one.

I received an email asking about a specific blog post; the sender wanted to buy one of its photos. They were taken before I was born, I said, and I reprinted them with permission. A friend reminded me I could have gotten them from someone’s relative who worked on the first Tappan Zee Bridge in the early 1950s.

March 22, 2012, was a balmy night, too warm for a winter coat so I wore a denim jacket, a tee shirt and jeans. I’d never been to the Quay Condominium, where my editor sent me to cover a meeting/project update for residents.

New York State Thruway Authority officials got an earful that night, which began my seven-year (so far, this month) bridge reporting. Most of the photos on this blog are mine; several are from Flickr, and many are from the NYSTA. Permission is secured prior to my using them, and all are properly credited.

Looking at a very different view from the same steps a few years later/© Janie Rosman

Today’s request made me chuckle me because the person who wanted to buy one of the photos I posted of the first Tappan Zee Bridge’s construction needed them for a project with the NYSTA. I researched and guessed (my hunch was confirmed) the person’s company already had those photos . . . directly from the source.

It’s been a full circle day in more ways than one.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

The Little Yellow Line next to the Esposito Trail

Had to see the trail for myself after reading posts and viewing pictures. I wasn’t prepared for my reaction and got teary as I stood on the corner while cars passed or turned around me. It looked barren and sad; no solace that signs pointing to a detour were posted.

The yellow line that was part of a parking concept a few years ago resulted in the destruction of nature and a path I liked to walk on occasion. I still don’t know why the bridge’s path had to enter a neighborhood. Why couldn’t it continue to the parking lot and connect from there with another route?

The little yellow line next to the Esposito Trail is coming and is the reality above.

“We want to ensure that the concept chosen will be the best for our residents and will eliminate parking from our streets while allowing for economic development,” Christian told the Rockland County Times Wednesday (from my 2015 article).

Relief that the SUP terminus was moved from the corner of Cornelison Avenue and South Broadway resulted in construction next to the Esposito Trail, where crews will build the shared use path spur.

I saw the above flowers growing to the left of the closed trail entrance and hope they weren’t uprooted. Nature is resilient and will bloom again in the spring. The bridge will not solve congestion from Port Chester to Suffern; it balloons onto the Sprain Brook Parkway’s exit lane as cars trying to merge onto I-287 are jockeying with cars that want to take Exit 2.

The new bridge has safety features and extra lanes; however, there have been numerous accidents and traffic jams during its short life. Did the extra lanes help? How will the traffic be resolved by adding bicycles lanes along Rockland and Westchester roads? Please don’t take more lanes from already congested routes.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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