Archive for the ‘Tarrytown’ Category

A Full Circle Day, and in More Ways than One

Standing on steps near Quay Condominium clubhouse in Tarrytown/© Janie Rosman

People ask about photos I take and post in this blog; twice an editor asked to reprint two and paid me. Today I had a photo request from someone, and that request made me realize my reporting about the bridge project has come full circle in more ways than one.

I received an email asking about a specific blog post; the sender wanted to buy one of its photos. They were taken before I was born, I said, and I reprinted them with permission. A friend reminded me I could have gotten them from someone’s relative who worked on the first Tappan Zee Bridge in the early 1950s.

March 22, 2012, was a balmy night, too warm for a winter coat so I wore a denim jacket, a tee shirt and jeans. I’d never been to the Quay Condominium, where my editor sent me to cover a meeting/project update for residents.

New York State Thruway Authority officials got an earful that night, which began my seven-year (so far, this month) bridge reporting. Most of the photos on this blog are mine; several are from Flickr, and many are from the NYSTA. Permission is secured prior to my using them, and all are properly credited.

Looking at a very different view from the same steps a few years later/© Janie Rosman

Today’s request made me chuckle me because the person who wanted to buy one of the photos I posted of the first Tappan Zee Bridge’s construction needed them for a project with the NYSTA. I researched and guessed (my hunch was confirmed) the person’s company already had those photos . . . directly from the source.

It’s been a full circle day in more ways than one.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

The Little Yellow Line next to the Esposito Trail

Had to see the trail for myself after reading posts and viewing pictures. I wasn’t prepared for my reaction and got teary as I stood on the corner while cars passed or turned around me. It looked barren and sad; no solace that signs pointing to a detour were posted.

The yellow line that was part of a parking concept a few years ago resulted in the destruction of nature and a path I liked to walk on occasion. I still don’t know why the bridge’s path had to enter a neighborhood. Why couldn’t it continue to the parking lot and connect from there with another route?

The little yellow line next to the Esposito Trail is coming and is the reality above.

“We want to ensure that the concept chosen will be the best for our residents and will eliminate parking from our streets while allowing for economic development,” Christian told the Rockland County Times Wednesday (from my 2015 article).

Relief that the SUP terminus was moved from the corner of Cornelison Avenue and South Broadway resulted in construction next to the Esposito Trail, where crews will build the share used path spur.

I saw the above flowers growing to the left of the closed trail entrance and hope they weren’t uprooted. Nature is resilient and will bloom again in the spring. The bridge will not solve congestion from Port Chester to Suffern; it balloons onto the Sprain Brook Parkway’s exit lane as cars trying to merge onto I-287 are jockeying with cars that want to take Exit 2.

The new bridge has safety features and extra lanes; however, there have been numerous accidents and traffic jams during its short life. Did the extra lanes help? How will the traffic be resolved by adding bicycles lanes along Rockland and Westchester roads? Please don’t take more lanes from already congested routes.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Esposito Trail is cleared for New Bridge’s Path

Crews are building a shared use path on the new bridge’s westbound span that has an extension directly into a South Nyack neighborhood, doesn’t connect to the Tarrytown train station and is 3.6 miles with little shade. Above is a photo of the Esposito Trail taken last July, when nature was at its seasonal finest.

Recent photo of the now-barren Esposito Trail in South Nyack taken by Kristy Leader

A new video promoting the path starts at the parking lot and bypasses the Clinton Avenue exit in South Nyack for which trees — lush and green in spring and summer — along the trail were removed from Clinton Avenue and South Franklin Street to Village Hall

Initial work on the path and tree removal began two months ago. To reiterate how I felt last year and still do, it’s hard for me to imagine what it will be like walking the trail, which will remain cinder, once the new path is built.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Solace and the Familiar Smell of the Ocean

Today was a beautiful day with a blue sky and blue river, perfect for checking out the project from the viewing area at Nyack’s Memorial Park. Mom loved people-watching from the car, eating ice cream and happy to spend a few hours with me. I missed her this afternoon.

The Hudson River smelled comforting like the ocean as I walked to the viewing area. One woman was sitting in the sun and returned my smile and comment. “I come here with the kids and don’t have to drive,” she said.

Since I was one of the few — very few — drivers holding to the speed limit, I was able to capture one of the crew working on the new maintenance building. This is where the shared use path will begin so it’s a good time to let you know I’ve been walking between seven and 10 miles per week for when the path opens in 2019.

This 12-foot-wide path (far right lane in the photo above) might fit three people abreast comfortably. Can’t see how people and bicycles can peaceably coexist on the path, especially if the walkers are strolling casually. Let’s hope so.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

New York State Prepared to & Did Bridge a Gap*

One of my favorite photos from that day: two members of the construction team watch the crowds prior to the opening ceremony for the new bridge’s westbound span. It was a hot August day, and dad’s golf hat was my lucky charm.

Westbound traffic moved to that span the following night. The Tappan Zee was our eastbound ride for the next six weeks, and then — with slightly less fanfare than its earlier transition — eastbound traffic moved to the new span.

One driver’s wish came true: he was the last ride on the Tappan Zee Bridge, and we had a new eastbound ride. In early November, its first section was removed.

Less of the Tappan Zee now as sections of it are removed to be repurposed per a Thruway Authority board decision in July. Crews continue building the eastbound span and — near the Westchester landing — the new maintenance facility, new building for state police south of the Thruway and the walking and bicycle path.

With its main span towers and piers lit in lavender, the new bridge looked pretty against the oncoming late August night sky. I kept thinking, “Purple reigns on the Hudson Valley” (photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority) as I crossed the Tappan Zee Bridge westbound for the last time.

How many of you will remember 2017 as the year the Tappan Zee Bridge closed to traffic? Since last December, when the new bridge’s main span towers were completed, crews have been working toward its opening. The above-mentioned months stand out in my mind; your mileage may vary.

*Tag line for this blog is New York State Prepares to Bridge a Gap™

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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