Archive for the ‘Tarrytown’ Tag

Sneak Peek at NYS Police Troop T’s Future Home

Today your intrepid reporter visited the project site. The above New York State Thruway Authority photo shows only one side so, camera in hand . . .

I drove past the fork in the road and was stopped by a guard. After a few minutes of talking, I took a few photos of the structure from an “invisible via car” side.

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Several years earlier, residents in the 40-home neighborhood bordering the bridge were concerned about how vehicles would access the construction site, safety for kids playing, school buses and the nearby JCC.

The area was quiet and clean this afternoon; the only visible signs of construction were structures (seen here) towering over a metal fence guarded by security. Past the cars and the Thruway is the new maintenance facility with new metal panels.

Personal note: A big thank you with gratitude and appreciation to everyone who supported me during the past stressful week. Mom was taken to the hospital one week ago Friday with multiple complications and was discharged yesterday with renewed spirit and appetite.

Needing to make a decision about mom in addition to other responsibilities, I kept putting one foot in front of the other. I’m relieved her health has improved and that she’s in a new facility to help her regain mobility and balance.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Cool views invisible from the Driver’s Seat: completing one Span and removing Another

Painter standing on a girder more than 400 feet long, and no fear of height here./NYSTA

What we can see from the car/SUV — motorcycle riders have the advantage of no window frames — is the new maintenance facility underway near the Westchester landing. What goes on under and next to the bridges are different stories.

Think this person is standing on a pier near the Westcheser landing? You’re right!/NYSTA

Now that River Road is open — and the Tappan Zee Bridge’s abutment is gone — look for cranes near Westchester landing removing sections of TZB steel and concrete. The colossal crane will remove the first of 20 sections now then through next spring, the largest weighing up to 2,600,000-plus pounds.

This scaffolding platform will be under the TZB to help crews during its demolition/NYSTA

The TZB’s decline was so sharp that when mom and dad took us to the country, my younger brother and I were sure we’d drive right into the Hudson River. Not quite. It looks harmless here alongside a barge.

That decline was protected from ice by wooden piles, now collected in this barge /NYSTA

While River Road is open, bridge lanes and an on-ramp will be closed at various times during the week as work continues near the landings. Click here for details.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Lane and Exit Closures per work on TZB Landings

This photo of Tappan Zee Bridge structural steel being removed with the bridge and river as backdrops is courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

You can see crews removing parts of the Westchester landing as you drive across from Rockland. The super crane will help with the removal starting in November.

What you can’t see is the Rockland landing; however, River Road in South Nyack is closed while crews work on the Rockland landings; click here for detour route, ramp and lane closures from Exit 11 southbound to Exit 10 through next Friday.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Work on TZB Landings brings Lane, Exit Closures

Recent photo of the Westchester landing shows two-way traffic moving on the new Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge while crews begin demolishing the Tappan Zee Bridge’s landings courtesy EarthCam® construction camera.

River Road in South Nyack is closed while crews work on the Rockland landings; click here for detour route, ramp and lane closures from Exit 11 southbound to Exit 9.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

A Look Back at Turn-of-the-Century Bridge Plans

Originally scheduled for print publication, this story was cut due to lack of space. Photos from when the Tappan Zee Bridge was built are courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Forty-one months ago and with the recently-closed Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge as his backdrop, President Barack Obama spoke about his transportation bill, announcing a new infrastructure plan that included fast-tracking the bridge replacement project.

“At times you can see the river through the cracks of the pavement,” Obama had commented about it. “Now, I’m not an engineer, but I figure that’s not good.

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The idea to build a bridge across one of the widest points in the Hudson River began as early as 1905 with a bridge (railroad) Piermont to Hastings. Calls continued for the next 20 or so years.

Craig Long, historian for Rockland County, the villages of Montebello and Suffern and the Town of Ramapo, recalled Pearl River resident and state assemblyman Fred Horn — nicknamed “Father of the Bridge” — proposed a bill in 1930 for a bridge from Piermont to Hastings with Hook Mountain and Rockland Lake as other locations.

During the next two years, Horn proposed that idea and a bridge/tunnel from Snedens Landing to Dobb’s Ferry; however, the site was within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s 25-mile jurisdiction. Those ideas failed as did Horn when he ran for re-election.

Long said via email that in 1935, the Rockland Causeway-Tunnel Authority was created with a drive to bridge the Hudson from Nyack to Tarrytown. “As studies begin, no determination is made as to whether Upper Nyack, Nyack, or South Nyack will be the bridge’s terminus. In August of that year, it is central Nyack; by October it is South Nyack, Voorhis Point.”

The following March (1936) Grand View was chosen as a potential landing site; by August the War Department approved it and Tarrytown on the Westchester side. While Hook Mountain again a choice the northern location didn’t sit well with Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader, who gained support for nixing the idea, or with residents.

“This is the beauty spot of the Hudson Valley, which should not be destroyed by a bridge,” Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader protested. New York State governor Thomas E. Dewey, and local legislators, received hundreds of telegrams and letters protesting the proposed 3.25-mile crossing, according to an editorial in The New York Times said.

South Nyack’s business district and Tarrytown riverfront estates were sacrificed and paved the way for this Hudson Valley crossing more than 60 years ago that lasted beyond its time. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute alumnus Emil H. Pager of Madigan-Hyland designed the $81 million Bridge for a 50-year service life that resulted in a utilitarian appearance, RPI Professor Michael Symons noted.

Foundation piers and steel false work were constructed near Haverstraw at Grassy Point. Rive water was dammed off to lower its level, and when the piers were completed, the dams were broken to release the water. Those newly-constructed sections were then towed downriver to the project site.

Ten days before Christmas 1955, the new bridge opened to traffic, connecting I-87 northbound from New York City to Albany, and later connecting to I-287 (Cross Westchester Expressway). Legislation signed by Governor W. Averell Harriman on February 28, 1956, officially named it the Tappan Zee Bridge to honor the Tappan Indians of the Lenape tribe and Zee for “sea” in Dutch.

Twelve-year-old Paul Anderson surprised everyone at the ribbon-cutting ceremony — including Nyack resident and actress Helen Hayes MacArthur, Thruway Authority Chairman Bertram D. Tallamy, and other dignitaries — by walking across the bridge, earning him a ride in the governor’s black Cadillac.

In 1994, the structure was rededicated and renamed when Governor Malcolm Wilson’s name was added on the 20th anniversary of his leaving the governor’s office.

A 27-mile stretch of Thruway from Suffern to Yonkers opened only 18 months after the first cars drove on the thruway upstate. Not what you’d expect four days after opening was a major traffic accident when four cars traveling from Rockland to Westchester at dusk bumped into each other.

The bridge was eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (under Criteria A and C in Appendix D – Preliminary Section 106 and 4(f) Analysis for Tappan Zee Bridge). The purportedly-100-year-old wood barge and its coal cargo submerged below – reminiscent of the river’s role in industry and commerce, and in the construction zone – were also recommended for the same prestigious award.

Coincidentally, March 1952 marked the start of construction, and 60 years later (March 2012) came a Request for Proposal (RFP) for its replacement — the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge — whose westbound span recently opened. As eastbound traffic was moved to that span ahead of schedule, crews can begin dismantling the Tappan Zee Bridge so the new bridge’s eastbound span can be completed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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