Archive for the ‘Hudson River’ Tag

Where the Bridge meets Water, Land and Itself

Above is one of the two 14-foot-thick foundations that each support four of the eight main span towers. Each foundation is 360 feet long and 60 feet wide and is filled with 11,000 cubic yards of concrete.

“Oh, East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet.” Really?

This is kinda bridge-related since it intrigued us in a @NewNYBridge tweet.

Remember when we were stumped by what looked like a football helmet with stubs (looked like to me) sticking out of the sides (below)? Here’s where you can find this intriguing piece of art and much more.

You thought I forgot to write about current bridge news, right? To read what’s doing, check herePhoto courtesy New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Sunrise on Bridges; More Stay Cables Installed

This awesome view of the sunrise was captured by Chris Lopez, a surveyor at New York Geomatics, Inc. He works on the new bridge’s towers before dawn and has a perfect view of each day’s awakening.

Can you tell which span they’re on? Hint: closest to the current bridge. You also see a stay cable right behind them. Crews anchored and tensioned 110 of an eventual 192 cables and continue installing them on the eastbound span this week.

Did you find the clues?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Educational Outreach explains the Pulley System

This cool interactive demonstration at Stemtastics in Larchmont showed kids and parents how pulleys work to lift weights like structural steel on bridges.

The I Lift NY super crane’s versabar (system) can lift up to 1700 metric tons (1928 US tons), much-needed strength when lifting pieces of structural steel.

* * * * *

It’s getting closer to when two-way traffic will shift to the the westbound span; however, I’m wondering how the belvederes will be constructed while cars are on that span. Will one lane be closed so crews can safely work on the shared use path? Will the belvederes be completed before traffic moves to the westbound span?

Here’s a view of the westbound span, where workers lower formwork over rebar. Getting there! Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

TBT: Looking Back at Earlier Project Photos

What are those things floating in the river? Debris? No, those are piles, and the story that day (June 2014 media tour) was pile cleansing: scooping out the muck prior to filling them with concrete and rebar (reinforced steel).

Did you notice the super crane is on the south side of the bridge? It had recently arrived at the project site, where crews waited for low tide a few days later before limbo-ing it under the current bridge.

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Oh my, how tiny it looks at ground level. This is from early September 2015, when crews began building those now-419-foot tall towers using self-climbing jump forms. Are those cartoon heads in the red truck?

Here’s a memory from days gone by, when tolls were 50 cents each way. One-way collection was adopted August 12, 1970, and toll booths on the northbound lanes were removed.

And guess what? We made it through the Ides of March. Ha!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Bridge Project photos on a snowy Pi (3.14) Day

March never ceases to amaze: we March(ed) forth days ago, and today’s a play on words, Pi Day. May the Ides of March weather be gentle. We’ll see.

Pretty scene last night with the fiery sunset as backdrop to the new bridge’s towers. Here’s the same view 18 hours later: looks a bit different, right?

By 9:30 a.m., one of the Peregrine falcons ventured out to see what’s doing, and by 11 am. (a snow lull), it was back inside and discussing its findings.

Photos 2, 3 and 4 courtesy of EarthCam® Construction Cameras.

Today I’m fact-checking and editing an article about the project for an upcoming deadline. When it’s published, I’ll post the link here. Happy Pi Day!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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