Archive for the ‘Hudson River’ Tag

New Falcon Chicks are Nameless No More

The cuties smiling for the New York State Thruway Authority have names!

More than 2,000 people voted to name the new chicks Puente, suggested by Claremont Elementary School in Ossining, and Tarrytalon, suggested by 2nd graders at Concord Road Elementary School in Ardsley.

Congratulations to all who participated!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Boater Safety Rules for the Bridge Project Site

You know boating near the project site is restricted and dangerous, right? Not watch-out-for-sharks dangerous yet close to it. (Pity the kayaker above!)

From the New NY Bridge website:

• Stay clear of all overhead work and maintain a safe distance of 1,000 feet from all construction equipment and support vessels.

• Use the center 600 feet of the Main Channel (when available) to navigate in a north-south direction with no wake at a maximum speed of five knots.

• All bridge piers and abutments are protected by a 25-yard security zone.

• No unauthorized vessels are allowed in the Safety Zone surrounding 16 construction barge mooring locations. Lighted buoys mark the zone and mooring locations.

• Regulated Navigation Areas (RNAs) stretch 500 yards north and 500 yards south of the existing bridge. No vessel may stop, moor, anchor or loiter within the RNAs.

• The Eastern RNA will be extremely active and vessels transitioning to and from the eastern shoreline at Tarrytown should approach and depart to the north. The Western RNA will be impassable at times and mariners should stay clear of the area.

• Lighted channel markers provide recreational boater access to the Piermont waterfront.

• Construction barges and other vessels on the site are being tracked by GPS technology.

• TZC will monitor Marine Radio Channel 16 to communicate with boaters.

The New York State Thruway Authority provides this information as a public service. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. Nothing in these guidelines shall supersede the actual construction conditions, and regulations set forth by the U.S. Coast Guard.

Watch out for fins in the water! I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spectacular view from There: on top of a Tower

You know the radio station whose broadcasting promo says it’s from the top top top top top top top of the Empire State Building? While scaffolding is still in place, one project official also went to the top: of one tower.

He rode an elevator to its 280-foot view (crossover bridge) and then walked steps on the outside of that tower to its tippy-top. Photos courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Whoosh! Here’s his magnificent view from high above the Hudson Valley:

Facing north: one of the new main span towers high above the Hudson River/© H. Jackson

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Falcon Chicks Need Names so Be Sure to Vote

We’re trying to have a family talk here if you don’t mind./Photo courtesy of EarthCam®

Mama’s telling us to mind our own business. We can take a hint for now. In the meantime, check out potential names for her chicks, and choose your favorite by May 9.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Super Crane Limbos Again — under Three Spans

There’s something a little different about this photo . . . /EarthCam® construction camera

Have you figured out what’s different about this photo? C’mon, you must have guessed. Here’s another hint from 14 hours earlier in the day.

Now you see it, now you don’t: super crane has moved!/EarthCam® construction camera

The project team kept silent about a certain three-span maneuver (focusing our attention on other doings); your intrepid reporter received a tip.

Back on the southern side 31 months after arriving here/EarthCam® construction camera

No crane in sight, and then it appeared on the other side of the Tappan Zee. Thank you to the source who alerted me yesterday afternoon.

Crane clears the Tappan Zee Bridge/© Janie Rosman 2014

It must have been tricky since the two new spans are considerably higher than the current bridge. You remember the planning involved last time, right? It limboed under the bridge — aided by extra low tide that added an extra foot or two of clearance — two days after its arrival.

With that in mind, the unspoken question on many people’s minds is, “When?”

If the original plans had been followed, then the westbound span would have opened in late 2016: west/northbound traffic was to have moved to the new span in December, and two months later, in February 2017, east/southbound traffic was to have moved to that span.

Hmm.

I recall hearing the bridge builder has incentives for completing the full bridge and all its accents by March/April 2018, and there would be penalties “if the Thruway Authority isn’t handed the keys to the new bridge by that date or if it’s completed even one day later.”

Said by a source working on the project. Were these guidelines abandoned?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

%d bloggers like this: