Archive for the ‘Hudson River’ Tag

Shared Use Path Construction and Mom Thoughts

Here’s what I saw yesterday on the Westchester approach span en route to Nyack, where I walked and then stopped and then stopped into the Outreach Center. Its windows are decorated with blue sneakers that I thought represent the river. The young man at the desk said they represent the under-construction path on the westbound span.

It took me endless hours to write because I wanted it to be perfect until one friend said, “You only need to make it real, honest and raw.” Tonight I venture there again, this time with a post about mom and the shared use path now I glimpsed after the lane switches last week.

I’d been writing about how mom wants to see the new bridge and the path, and how she’d love to view the Hudson Valley and the lighthouse and the mountains. Today I learned that might not happen as the prognosis for mom walking again is not good. Something happened during the time was recuperating from hip joint replacement surgery and was unable to drive and, thus, visit her. She told me someone pushed her wheelchair so her right knee buckled under her; it’s pained her since.

Worse yet, one of the aides from an agency we no longer use dropped mom while transferring her from her bed to her wheelchair, resulting in a visit by EMS and a day at a local hospital’s emergency room.

My heart is heavy. I so wanted mom to see the results of what we watched being built (above photo from February 2017) every time we drove to Memorial Park in Nyack or to one of the stores in West Nyack. It was a treat for her, a day trip, and I wish I could turn back the clock.

* * * * *

One of the overlook renderings included a person in a wheelchair (see last image above); however, the rendering was changed. See the difference between that and the photo below? Someone changed it? Why?

The above rendering is the first you see in this presentation. I’ve written about lack of shade on the path and the overlooks; perhaps the final designs will offer more protection from the sun.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Do a New Design and Name Erase the Past? No.

Obliterating the area’s history with the strokes of a brush/Courtesy of Rockland Report

Your intrepid reporter was not at today’s ceremony for the eastbound span for two reasons: mom is home from the nursing home, and she’s my first priority, and I have a new hip to protect. I look forward to driving on the new eastbound span tomorrow as it may offer a better view of what’s left of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Speaking of which . . .

Seems the best way to relabel signs is to do it at night when no one’s around . . . except those who work at night, come home at night and anyone else who will see. So the state will remove some signs and paint over others?

I’ve covered this project for the past six and one-half years and felt it was the most exciting project I covered, pitching it to editors that yielded stories in seven local and national publications. I feel obliterating the area’s history at whim and without a public hearing is wrong. You repeatedly said it’s a transparent project. How transparent was the decision to change the bridge’s name without public input and when no one was around?

Governor Cuomo, how transparent was this project when I requested information and was stalled repeatedly and then learned my hunch was correct? How strong was the state’s hesitation to produce information after you publicly said it would?

You spoke many times about the area’s beauty. Those who came before us felt the same, too, and then a bridge built was named to honor their heritage. It won’t be obliterated by new signs.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

What’s the Walking Distance of the New Path?

This is happening! Next week and/or mid-month, construction and prep begin for the new path. The above (driving) distance is from 303 S. Broadway in Tarrytown to where the shared use path would open onto Clinton Avenue and S. Franklin Street in South Nyack. So perhaps while the bridge is 3.1 miles, the distance from the Tarrytown information center parking lot to South Nyack is 3.3 miles?

If you start at the South Nyack parking lot, then it’s a longer walk to Tarrytown.

A friend and I used to take the train into New York City at night and walk around. If 20 city blocks (street to street, not avenue to avenue) is one mile, than we covered quite a bit of territory. I wore Easy Spirit Motion shoes and never thought twice about comfort as my feet were happy. Sneakers might be more supportive now, especially after hip surgery; however, Merrells have been and are my mainstay.

Maybe either the Thruway Authority or the state will consider offering rides to walkers who need them as there’s no shade on the bridge. Bringing an umbrella takes up space, and unless I was the sole walker it’d be rude to take up someone else’s space.

I was gently reminded last week the new path is more than six miles roundtrip. While I’m planning to walk one way, I might need that ride back as it’s been more than 20 years since I walked 60 city blocks in one night with my friend.

Still, I recently resumed walking between one to two miles daily at least four times a week. During one of early the open houses for the project, someone from the state joked about selling cold beverages at the viewing areas. It wouldn’t be a bad idea.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

TBT: Three-Month Dredging Period Begins; Nautical Warnings Reiterated

From five years ago today. Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

Yesterday opened the three-month (to November 1) window for dredging in the Hudson River, and today began round-the-clock operations.

“Excavation is in the shallow water to the east and west side(s) of the Federal Navigation Channel,” the Local Notice to Mariners reported. “Various barges are anchored outside the Federal Navigation Channel upstream of the bridge. On scene are the dredges WEEKS 506 & 551, tugs and barges that are lit; all are monitoring VHF-FM channels 13 and 16.”

It continued, “Mariners are urged to use extreme caution and transit the area at their slowest safe speed to create minimum wake after passing arrangements have been made.”

This information is reiterated in the Boat Owners Association of the United States’ East Coast Alerts by Mel Neale (August 1, 2013).

The chosen design requires less environmental impact regarding pile driving, dredging and threats to fish; the NYS DEC Final Permit, issued March 25, 2013, and additional Coast Guard information, are posted at the New NY Bridge website, which issued a press release today re operations and safety.

“Equipment associated with the operation is arriving on site. Approximately one dozen barges and other specially designed dredging vessels will be part of the operation,” the release said. It referred to the Coast Guard’s revised Notice to Mariners that details updated safety information, “including a request that boaters use extreme caution within 1,000 feet of all construction barges as a safety precaution.”

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2013

Last Historical Society of Rockland County TZB Tour

You find all sorts of interesting objects in the Hudson River, like these pier caps from the Tappan Zee Bridge that were being barged to the Port of Coeymans and will be reused. Photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Today was the last time the Mississippi-style paddle wheeler River Rose hosted the Historical Society of Rockland County’s Tappan Zee Bridge Experience: Past, Present and Future. I attended last month and saw the bridge, despite missing a center chunk of its span and landings, getting as much camera attention as its recent $4 billion replacement.

“This is our fifth year, we’ve taken 12 trips and about 1,800 people” to see the bridge project, HSRC Executive Director Susan Deeks said during that trip. “It’s been a blast. Everyone has had a good time during these trips.”

It has been a blast for me, Susan, for the past five years, and I thank you and HSRC, the Thruway Authority and the bridge project for these fascinating and unparalleled adventures.

Crews continue removing parts of the Tappan Zee and putting overhead gantries on the eastbound span. Might as well take down the 45-miles-per-hour speed limit LED signs on the westbound span gantries as vehicles, especially trucks, like to ignore them. I follow the speed limit and get tailgated.

Getting there. Gantry installation, closure pours, concrete pours at the Rockland landing and work on the Thruway maintenance and state police facility continue.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

%d bloggers like this: