Archive for the ‘main span towers’ Tag

Spring: it Really IS Peeking around the Corner

My cousin Russ grew up in New York and has been living on the West Coast since I don’t remember how long. Some years back he visited for a few days. A history buff, he suggested we suggested we see “Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure” (2001). I wasn’t familiar with Shackleton and walked out of the theater amazed at his courage and determination. If you haven’t seen this seat-gripping film about his landmark expedition, then I suggest adding it to your list.

Big reach here: despite this winter’s bone-chilling temps the bridge project progressed, and classes that scheduled presentations these past few months often got more than they bargained for: outdoors, learning about the project where, right behind them in the river, crews worked despite the elements.

I don’t like cold and don’t take to it well; however, I make exceptions when the activity outweighs the weather . . . for an exciting day on the westbound span during the towers’ topping off ceremony in December. Whether you’re in the elements to work on the project or to visit it, bravo!

Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

More than half of 192 Stay Cables are in Place

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Before you tell me to keep both eyes on the road and hands on the wheel: I did. Mom was with me and caught the late afternoon sun casting shadows.

“What are those pointed things on top?” she indicated with a finger.

I explained about the main span towers and the roadway and said the new bridge is supported differently than the current bridge is.

Nearly four years ago, the Visual Quality Panel let public decide if the new towers’ tops would be angled or squared. While vastly unlike the current bridge, the new one has more than 100 of its eventual 192 stay cables fully anchored and tensioned to the main span roadway.

Next was the eastbound span (visible until it ended), bright blue and higher than the Thruway. “Are we going to drive on that?” she asked.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Few More Glimpses around the NNYB Project Site

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Did you see the I Lift NY making its 2017 debut lift on the Westchester side?

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Crew member well-protected against the elements: BRR, it’s COLD out there!

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A pile cap for the as-yet-unfinished eastbound span prepared under the TZB.

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Not seen from the road: crews adjusting a section of steel for the main span.

Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Bridge Design pops up in an Unlikely Location

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Expect the unexpected, right?

Yesterday while waiting for an appointment I took notice of the shapes and design in the office carpet. Would you believe I saw the recently-topped main span towers and road deck?

Do you also see the towers in the pattern? I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Now and Then and a Changing Hudson Valley

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This year the first span opens, and the Hudson Valley will again change. I love this photo of the kids looking at the construction and see it symbolizing the future, their future, as the figure below imagined his future years before.

Craig Long, historian for the Villages of Suffern and Montebello and the Town of Ramapo, discussed previous ideas for a Hudson River crossing last summer.

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

Courtesy of the Westchester County Archives

I focused on his narrative about Nanuet Assemblyman Fred Horn, the “Father of the Bridge,” who rallied for one-quarter century for such a project.

Long said a bridge (railroad) was proposed from Piermont to Hastings as early 1905 with calls continuing for the next 20 or so years. It gained traction, he said, when Horn took office, proposing a bill in 1930 for a bridge from Piermont to Hastings with Hook Mountain and Rockland Lake as other locations.

During the next two years Horn proposed a bridge, then a bridge/tunnel from Snedens Landing to Dobb’s Ferry.

Here’s where the sparks begin to fly.

thenGood idea except the proposed site was within the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s 25-mile jurisdiction, and it would need to approve, and then, operate the project. The proposals failed as did Horn when he ran for re-election.

“In 1935, the Rockland Causeway-Tunnel Authority was created with a drive to bridge the Hudson from Nyack to Tarrytown,” Long said in an email. “As studies begin, no determination is made as to whether Upper Nyack, Nyack, or South Nyack will be the bridge’s terminus. In August of that year, it is central Nyack; by October it is South Nyack, Voorhis Point.

tzb-signThe following March (1936) Grand View was chosen as a potential landing site; by August the War Department approved it and Tarrytown on the Westchester side. While Hook Mountain again a choice the northern location didn’t sit well with Zoning Commissioner Elmer Hader, who gained support for nixing the idea, or with residents.

Long wrote, “In October of that year, the Journal News took a straw poll on the idea of a Hudson River crossing and where it should be located” with an unscientific tally of 792 in favor and 405 opposed. Grand View was the favored location 391 votes (not residents). Results from boring led the state to abandon the project one month later. Last fall marked 80 years since that straw poll.

Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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