Archive for the ‘main span towers’ Tag

It’s a New Year with the Same Tolls . . . for Now

carpet-design

Expect the unexpected, right?

In the most unlikely place two years ago this month, I noticed the design on the carpet of my doctor’s office looked like the main span towers and road deck. Do you also see the towers in the pattern?

Seen at summer 2018 final TZB historical tour from Haverstraw Bay./© J. Rosman 2018

Will 2019 be the last year for a five-dollar cash toll on the new bridge? Maybe Larry Schwartz was right: eight days after he, Cuomo’s then-secretary and chief-of-staff, announced the probability of inflated cash tolls ($14) on the new bridge, the governor called for the task force.

How’s that working out? I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2019

Flashback Friday: Two Years Ago Today

early-august-2016

This photo was taken in early August, when the towers were nearing their eventual heights. The new bridge is more even (less grade) so trucks won’t have to do what my neighbor calls “stop for air,” referring to their use of air brakes and shifting as needed on the current bridge.

Assembled more than 15 months ago, blue jump forms will be repurposed./© H. Hackson

Assembled more than 15 months ago, blue jump forms will be repurposed./© H. Hackson

You see a construction vehicle, right? Now look closely at what’s ON it.

Crews continue removing the self-climbing forms that helped build the main span towers during the past 15 months. They’re driven off the bridge — the westbound span is connected to land — to be repurposed.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Concrete Pours continue on Soon-to-Open Span

Remember these? They’re deck panels at the Westchester landing months earlier. The same way kids’ toys interlock, these hairpin reinforcing steel bars connect deck panels to each other. Reinforcing concrete will be poured between the spaces (around the steel) prior to the final driving surface. Photo courtesy of the New York State Thruway Authority.

Enlarged photo of Westchester landing, where crews are pouring cement closures after deck panels were installed /Kevin Coughlin/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

The other day someone asked me why the Tappan Zee Bridge couldn’t be used as a bridge park. One look at the section below from the same photo will answer his question.

People ask why the Tappan Zee Bridge cannot become a bridge park. The reason: no way to connect it to land /Kevin Coughlin/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

You can see that the new westbound span and in-progress eastbound span are connected to the Westchester landing, and the piers of the Tappan Zee Bridge are hanging out in the river. How would people access the bridge park if there’s no connection to land?

Westchester and Rockland have plenty of beautiful riverside parks to enjoy. I disagreed with the idea for a bridge park, namely for safety and lack of feasibility. There’s a way to enjoy the river view from the new bridge when the side path opens in 2019.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

Deck Panel Installation Continues on New Span

Crews continue to set precast concrete deck panels atop the steel girders, install rebar, pour concrete and ready the driving surface of the eastbound span. This is what the westbound span looked like before its final driving surface was applied. Deck panels were interlocked via their hairpin reinforcing steel bars; the spaces between them were closed with reinforcing concrete.

They’re doing other work, too, including removing sections of the Tappan Zee Bridge. Their order is the section south of the center, a cantilever truss weighing 4,560 tons; strand jacks will then help lower the main span section closest to Westchester, an anchor span weighing 5,350 tons, onto barges. Then comes the section south of the center, followed by the section closest to Rockland.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

LHV Engineering Expo: 15th Annual STEM Event

As the bridge project met and hit timeline markers, your intrepid reporter met one of her own: last Sunday I attended the Lower Hudson Valley Engineering Expo at White Plains High School. Yes, my then four-and-one-half week new hip and I.

The first photo includes a black strand sticking up from the cross-section of stay cable. The photo above shows the top of that section with wires bundled into it.

Everyone wanted to see how heavy the section of 18-gauge galvanized rebar was compared to the residential rebar. I wonder if anyone tried to pick up the section of cement.

There were oyster shells — I put two up to my ear and thought I heard a whoosh although not like the ocean — and furry friends like this fish to show the project was protecting life below the bridge.

Weather not withstanding as spring is hiding somewhere, the day of companies, experiments, college and universities, learning and contests was a success. It was reigning STEM. You’re smiling if you understand the reference, and please pardon the pun if you don’t.

Watch for story about kids’ fascination with —  and how they’re learning about — STEM topics and activities in the May 2018 issue of Westchester Family.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2018

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