Archive for the ‘main span towers’ Tag

Happy Anniversary: Four Years of Blogging

Spring after the project started: “Figure Sitting at RiverWalk Park”/© Janie Rosman 2013

Four years ago I began writing this blog about what seemed at the time long-range plans that would “some day” materialize. And now, “some day” is here.

Six hundred ninety-three posts — in addition to countless newspaper and magazine articles — later, I still have mixed feelings about the project. It’s exciting to watch from afar and to cover, and it was an adventure to stand on the new westbound span last December. This area will change forever and will have a safer, more efficient crossing, both badly needed.

Aerial view of new/current spans/(Kevin P. Coughlin/Office of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo)

However, unless the highway on both sides of the river is also revamped, I foresee gridlock as more cars pour off the bridge in both Westchester and Rockland.

I’m still wondering about the shared use path. Without it, the state would have a majestic new bridge minus the added situations the path is creating. Three years ago I wrote that the belevederes, while interesting, gave little thought to practicality or to those who would use the path. Perhaps there’s still time to add shade.

Educational outreach’s fourth year at White Plains Engineering Expo/© Janie Rosman 2017

One official associated with the project joked last year the state could make money by selling soda, iced tea and water at the viewing areas because people may forget to bring hydration. That’s a good idea: remember, you read it here.

The Peregrine falcons are popular, and everyone wants to know where they are. Type “peregrine” into the search box to bring up falcon-related posts. This photo of their nesting box was taken about two years ago, when the bridge was a skeleton in the river.

Secret revealed! When in New York, they live here on the bridge’s northwest side./NYSTA

Less than eight weeks before the Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge opened, my parents got married. Directions to Lake Placid — where they honeymooned — from New York and New Jersey begin with “Take the NY State Thruway (I-87) north . . .” The new bridge was to open in two months; the Taconic State Parkway was “it” back then, mom said.

* * * * *

This year part of “some day” comes to fruition: two-way traffic will switch to the new westbound span, and the current bridge will be dismantled so the eastbound span can be completed and connected to the landings. They said everything that’s supposed to be completed by 2018 will be finished. So be it!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Engineering Expo and Recognizing Rebar

Today was a perfect chance to learn about the bridge project, what with plenty of experts at the Engineering Expo ready to answer questions. I bet you were there trying to stump one of them.

Not possible. You’d have learned, however, the main span towers are 1,200 feet apart at each end of the channel, and their platforms are 14 feet thick and more than 360 feet long. It took a lot of concrete — 11,000 cubic yards, to be exact — to fill them. And you’d have learned lots more.

While there I visited several exhibitors and, among other things, learned how sewers are relined using a sophisticated method. What caught my eye was an object on the table that was the same size and shape as something I’ve seen before.

I asked the woman if it was rebar; she said yes, it was, and seemed surprised I recognized it. Between you and me, I wouldn’t know a rebar sample from a hole in the wall had it not been for the educational outreach presentations. Speaking of which, check out photos from today here.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Sunrise on Bridges; More Stay Cables Installed

This awesome view of the sunrise was captured by Chris Lopez, a surveyor at New York Geomatics, Inc. He works on the new bridge’s towers before dawn and has a perfect view of each day’s awakening.

Can you tell which span they’re on? Hint: closest to the current bridge. You also see a stay cable right behind them. Crews anchored and tensioned 110 of an eventual 192 cables and continue installing them on the eastbound span this week.

Did you find the clues?

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spring: it Really IS Peeking around the Corner

My cousin Russ grew up in New York and has been living on the West Coast since I don’t remember how long. Some years back he visited for a few days. A history buff, he suggested we suggested we see “Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure” (2001). I wasn’t familiar with Shackleton and walked out of the theater amazed at his courage and determination. If you haven’t seen this seat-gripping film about his landmark expedition, then I suggest adding it to your list.

Big reach here: despite this winter’s bone-chilling temps the bridge project progressed, and classes that scheduled presentations these past few months often got more than they bargained for: outdoors, learning about the project where, right behind them in the river, crews worked despite the elements.

I don’t like cold and don’t take to it well; however, I make exceptions when the activity outweighs the weather . . . for an exciting day on the westbound span during the towers’ topping off ceremony in December. Whether you’re in the elements to work on the project or to visit it, bravo!

Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

More than half of 192 Stay Cables are in Place

old-and-new

Before you tell me to keep both eyes on the road and hands on the wheel: I did. Mom was with me and caught the late afternoon sun casting shadows.

“What are those pointed things on top?” she indicated with a finger.

I explained about the main span towers and the roadway and said the new bridge is supported differently than the current bridge is.

Nearly four years ago, the Visual Quality Panel let public decide if the new towers’ tops would be angled or squared. While vastly unlike the current bridge, the new one has more than 100 of its eventual 192 stay cables fully anchored and tensioned to the main span roadway.

Next was the eastbound span (visible until it ended), bright blue and higher than the Thruway. “Are we going to drive on that?” she asked.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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