Archive for the ‘Tappan Zee Bridge’ Category

Educational Outreach explains the Pulley System

This cool interactive demonstration at Stemtastics in Larchmont showed kids and parents how pulleys work to lift weights like structural steel on bridges.

The I Lift NY super crane’s versabar (system) can lift up to 1700 metric tons (1928 US tons), much-needed strength when lifting pieces of structural steel.

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It’s getting closer to when two-way traffic will shift to the the westbound span; however, I’m wondering how the belvederes will be constructed while cars are on that span. Will one lane be closed so crews can safely work on the shared use path? Will the belvederes be completed before traffic moves to the westbound span?

Here’s a view of the westbound span, where workers lower formwork over rebar. Getting there! Photos courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Spring: it Really IS Peeking around the Corner

My cousin Russ grew up in New York and has been living on the West Coast since I don’t remember how long. Some years back he visited for a few days. A history buff, he suggested we suggested we see “Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure” (2001). I wasn’t familiar with Shackleton and walked out of the theater amazed at his courage and determination. If you haven’t seen this seat-gripping film about his landmark expedition, then I suggest adding it to your list.

Big reach here: despite this winter’s bone-chilling temps the bridge project progressed, and classes that scheduled presentations these past few months often got more than they bargained for: outdoors, learning about the project where, right behind them in the river, crews worked despite the elements.

I don’t like cold and don’t take to it well; however, I make exceptions when the activity outweighs the weather . . . for an exciting day on the westbound span during the towers’ topping off ceremony in December. Whether you’re in the elements to work on the project or to visit it, bravo!

Photo courtesy of New York State Thruway Authority.

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

TBT: Looking Back at Earlier Project Photos

What are those things floating in the river? Debris? No, those are piles, and the story that day (June 2014 media tour) was pile cleansing: scooping out the muck prior to filling them with concrete and rebar (reinforced steel).

Did you notice the super crane is on the south side of the bridge? It had recently arrived at the project site, where crews waited for low tide a few days later before limbo-ing it under the current bridge.

Blue jump forms will help build the main span’s 419-foot towers./Photo: NYSTA

Oh my, how tiny it looks at ground level. This is from early September 2015, when crews began building those now-419-foot tall towers using self-climbing jump forms. Are those cartoon heads in the red truck?

Here’s a memory from days gone by, when tolls were 50 cents each way. One-way collection was adopted August 12, 1970, and toll booths on the northbound lanes were removed.

And guess what? We made it through the Ides of March. Ha!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Bridge Project photos on a snowy Pi (3.14) Day

March never ceases to amaze: we March(ed) forth days ago, and today’s a play on words, Pi Day. May the Ides of March weather be gentle. We’ll see.

Pretty scene last night with the fiery sunset as backdrop to the new bridge’s towers. Here’s the same view 18 hours later: looks a bit different, right?

By 9:30 a.m., one of the Peregrine falcons ventured out to see what’s doing, and by 11 am. (a snow lull), it was back inside and discussing its findings.

Photos 2, 3 and 4 courtesy of EarthCam® Construction Cameras.

Today I’m fact-checking and editing an article about the project for an upcoming deadline. When it’s published, I’ll post the link here. Happy Pi Day!

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

Peregrine Falcons’ Last Clutch in Current Home

Three months ago I looked across at the Tappan Zee Bridge and wondered if the falcon nest was over there on a beam. It moves to a new home this year.

This will be the last year the Peregrine falcon mama hatches her eyases — word has it she’s pregnant — in her current home/nest before moving day.

Looking fly (no pun intended): basking in the bright sunshine/Photo courtesy of EarthCam®

I’d like to know what you think.

Copyright © Janie Rosman and Kaleidoscope Eyes 2017

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